Voltage OCing with 7950 - Page 2 - Overclock.net

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post #11 of 16 Old 11-11-2012, 04:43 PM
 
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I wouldnt go over 1.3v, but if you find that something like 1.31 gets you 1250, its not like that extra .01 is gonna take that much more life off.
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post #12 of 16 Old 11-11-2012, 07:11 PM - Thread Starter
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Everyone just keeps throwing numbers out with no explanation as to why. I want to know what is the determining factor. Like a CPU OC is based on temps. Is a GPU OC based on this as well? Because like I said before, I can go to 1300 Im sure and have good temps but Id be around 1.35 or 1.4V.

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post #13 of 16 Old 11-11-2012, 07:24 PM
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I have the exact same card as you but my sample does 1280/1800 at 1.3 volts and temperatures are acceptable with the fans running at 100%. On air, your core and memory will likely give out before even requiring 1.35-1.4 volts. Find out for yourself, test your luck, and push for your maximum overclock thumb.gif
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post #14 of 16 Old 11-12-2012, 03:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruennis View Post

I have the exact same card as you but my sample does 1280/1800 at 1.3 volts and temperatures are acceptable with the fans running at 100%. On air, your core and memory will likely give out before even requiring 1.35-1.4 volts. Find out for yourself, test your luck, and push for your maximum overclock thumb.gif

It will go to 1300 core Im sure and judging by the incriments that it required on the voltage for 50mhz I would say it will land around 1.35 or 1.38
But once again my question still remains. It would seem nobody can actually answer this question which makes me question if I should even be at 1.3V since nobody seems to know why we even stop at 1.3V............

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post #15 of 16 Old 11-12-2012, 04:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twitch_alucard View Post

It will go to 1300 core Im sure and judging by the incriments that it required on the voltage for 50mhz I would say it will land around 1.35 or 1.38
But once again my question still remains. It would seem nobody can actually answer this question which makes me question if I should even be at 1.3V since nobody seems to know why we even stop at 1.3V............

Very simple. People don't push beyond 1.3v as they would not want to risk the longevity and long term stability of the card. There are chances of physical, electrical properties of the chip being affected due to electromigration. Pushing too much voltage through a chip can affect the material properties of the chip in the long term. from the article

http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2012/10/05/nvidia-crippling-partners/1

"We love to see our chips run faster and we understand that our customers want to squeeze as much performance as possible out of their GPUs. However, there is a physical limit to the amount of voltage that can be applied to a GPU before the silicon begins to degrade through electromigration. Essentially, excessive voltages on transistors can over time "evaporate" the metal in a key spot, destroying or degrading the performance of the chip. Unfortunately, since the process happens over time, it's not always immediately obvious when it's happening. Overvoltaging above our max spec does exactly this. It raises the operating voltage beyond our rated max and can erode the GPU silicon over time.

'In contrast, GPU Boost always keeps the voltage below our max spec, even as it is raising and lowering the voltage dynamically. That way you get great performance and a guaranteed lifetime. So our policy is pretty simple: We encourage users to go have fun with our GPUs. They are completely guaranteed and will perform great within the predefined limits. We also recommend that our board partners don’t build in mechanisms that raise voltages beyond our max spec. We set it as high as possible within long term reliability limits."
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post #16 of 16 Old 11-12-2012, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raghu78 View Post

Very simple. People don't push beyond 1.3v as they would not want to risk the longevity and long term stability of the card. There are chances of physical, electrical properties of the chip being affected due to electromigration. Pushing too much voltage through a chip can affect the material properties of the chip in the long term. from the article
http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2012/10/05/nvidia-crippling-partners/1
"We love to see our chips run faster and we understand that our customers want to squeeze as much performance as possible out of their GPUs. However, there is a physical limit to the amount of voltage that can be applied to a GPU before the silicon begins to degrade through electromigration. Essentially, excessive voltages on transistors can over time "evaporate" the metal in a key spot, destroying or degrading the performance of the chip. Unfortunately, since the process happens over time, it's not always immediately obvious when it's happening. Overvoltaging above our max spec does exactly this. It raises the operating voltage beyond our rated max and can erode the GPU silicon over time.
'In contrast, GPU Boost always keeps the voltage below our max spec, even as it is raising and lowering the voltage dynamically. That way you get great performance and a guaranteed lifetime. So our policy is pretty simple: We encourage users to go have fun with our GPUs. They are completely guaranteed and will perform great within the predefined limits. We also recommend that our board partners don’t build in mechanisms that raise voltages beyond our max spec. We set it as high as possible within long term reliability limits."

+1 Thank you for finally giving a solid answer. I could have guess it would have been you raghu haha. I always see you helpin out others

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