[THG] First 450Mps 802.11n Residental Gateway - Page 2 - Overclock.net

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post #11 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
A single Intel 5300 WiFi chip can utilize 3 streams....
Huh? As I read it, three streams are needed to utilize the full 450Mb/s bandwidth, counting it as one connection. If it is a 1Gb/s router, would that not mean just over two connections are needed to max it out (or just over 6 streams)?

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post #12 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by savagebunny View Post
Do you have anything else to do besides be a grammar nazi and troll?

Sorry my sentence structure isn't up to par.
I do not want to be called grammar nazi but I do get kinda hung up on the "there/their/they're" miss spelling.

But don't jump the douche wagon and call me a troll.

If you can't spell it's your own fault not some others.

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post #13 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 02:42 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stargate125645 View Post
Huh? As I read it, three streams are needed to utilize the full 450Mb/s bandwidth, counting it as one connection. If it is a 1Gb/s router, would that not mean just over two connections are needed to max it out (or just over 6 streams)?
Is 802.11n theortical peak bandwidth per channel or aggregate?

To answer most of your questions: (1) a fridge cannot cool a PC (2) 64-bit OS for over 3.4GB (3) If a PCIe card fits, it should work (4) Resolution, not screen size (5) Report, not respond to Spam (6) Single-Rail/Non-Modular PSUs are not always better than Multi-Rail/Modular (7) Sequential does not matter as much as random for OS drives (8) Requirements come before hardware for servers

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post #14 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Is 802.11n theortical peak bandwidth per channel or aggregate?
I have no idea what you're asking me. Something is wrong in that sentence, or you intend to imply something that I am not reading that makes that sentence make sense.

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post #15 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by stargate125645 View Post
I have no idea what you're asking me. Something is wrong in that sentence, or you intend to imply something that I am not reading that makes that sentence make sense.
His sentence is correct, but does this help?

Quote:
Is 802.11n theortical peak bandwidth per channel, or for all channels combined?
Also, is Intel 5300 (or a cousin) going to be coming to any desktop cards?

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post #16 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 03:49 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by stargate125645 View Post
I have no idea what you're asking me. Something is wrong in that sentence, or you intend to imply something that I am not reading that makes that sentence make sense.
I am asking the question....

When a company states the theortical peak bandwidth of a 802.11n device (450Mbps in this case), is that number:
1) 450Mbps per capable device
2) 450Mbps shared among all devices


I think it's #2?

To answer most of your questions: (1) a fridge cannot cool a PC (2) 64-bit OS for over 3.4GB (3) If a PCIe card fits, it should work (4) Resolution, not screen size (5) Report, not respond to Spam (6) Single-Rail/Non-Modular PSUs are not always better than Multi-Rail/Modular (7) Sequential does not matter as much as random for OS drives (8) Requirements come before hardware for servers

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post #17 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
I am asking the question....

When a company states the theortical peak bandwidth of a 802.11n device (450Mbps in this case), is that number:
1) 450Mbps per capable device
2) 450Mbps shared among all devices


I think it's #2?
Why call it a gigabit device if it can't do a gigabit? From the wording in the article I took it to mean 450Mbps per connection.

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post #18 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 04:02 PM
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Aha lol, yay my laptop can use it

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post #19 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by stargate125645 View Post
Why call it a gigabit device if it can't do a gigabit? From the wording in the article I took it to mean 450Mbps per connection.
Usually you try to make your product look as good as possible, by not going into the details of if its per device or across them all; you just use the bigger number. That's why LCD manufacturers push things like dynamic contrast ratio. I would also guess option 2 in DuckieHo's post.

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post #20 of 29 Old 06-09-2010, 04:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stargate125645 View Post
Why call it a gigabit device if it can't do a gigabit? From the wording in the article I took it to mean 450Mbps per connection.
It has a 1Gb WAN port and a 4x1Gb switch.

All residential gateways/routers that have this a 1Gb wired ports are called "Gigabit Routers". This has been a common term for like 5+ years....

To answer most of your questions: (1) a fridge cannot cool a PC (2) 64-bit OS for over 3.4GB (3) If a PCIe card fits, it should work (4) Resolution, not screen size (5) Report, not respond to Spam (6) Single-Rail/Non-Modular PSUs are not always better than Multi-Rail/Modular (7) Sequential does not matter as much as random for OS drives (8) Requirements come before hardware for servers

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