Help Pleaseee =/! Really New to OC'ing - Overclock.net

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post #1 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 12:16 PM - Thread Starter
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hi im really new to overclocking even though i read the overclocking guide. i have a lot of questions actually heh... before i ask questions have i a E6420 2.13ghz CPU with the p5k asus mobo. I am also running Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit System Builder Version if that helps

1. i see a lot of people talking about idle and load cpu temperature what does that mean? and how can i check mines

2. How can i check my Cpu speed, like if i overclocked it, how can i check what the current speed is(2.13 to 2.5)

3. What are the main programs i need to check and see if my overclocking is right. Like all the programs used for overclocking so i can check CPU speed, Temperature, Stability testing, programs like that.

4. i have CPUz and when i look at my corespeed its at 2.279mhz and it keeps switching between 2.279mhz and 2.280mhz lol i dont really know if thats bad but i dont know can anyone help. sometimes ive seen it go to 3.028 or something like that?

5. What is this 1:1 ratio i see people talking about? how can i change it 1:1 if i havent and how do i check if it is 1:1 lolol =/!

6. I read the guide and it says something about not going over your RAM?(DDR2800 or something) he does mean you actually ram not some ram inside your CPU and if so how can i check to see if my RAM is ddr2800 i lost the packaging to it or does he mean the motherboard RAM or w/e because on my mobo it says DDR2800. I Have the pk5 Series mobo from asus and it has this memory speed boost thingie =/!

7. What are some good Temperatures to keep my CPU at i heard that anything under 50c is good for the CPU and the vcore i should stay with 10% of the stock vcore?

Im really sorry for wasting your time guys. i just really wanna overclock my PC so i can get the best performance when Age of Conan comes out. I know im really noob at this but if you guys are willing to help me out i'd really appreciate it thank you very much. Bye
~Ohhdang
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post #2 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 12:20 PM
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CPUZ to check clocks and memory clock/timings.

PC Wizard 2007/CoreTemp 0.95/Intel TAT for temp monitoring.

And look up The Duke's FAQ on how to find your hardware's maxes.

ORTHOS for stability testing.

1:1 ratio means your RAM is going at the same clock as your FSB. DDR2 800 runs at 400mhz. so at 1:1 you would need a 400FSB to run at stock clocks.

Keep load temps under 65 if possible, preferably under 60.

Idle and load temps are simple. Open a temp monitoring program and let your comp idle for like 20-30 mins without any processor activity, then look at the temp. That is your idle temp.

Then open the likes of ORTHOS or Folding@Home or whatever you want, and load the processor with it. After about 30 mins it should have peaked. That's your load temp.
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post #3 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 12:21 PM
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  1. Idle temperature is the temperature of the CPU when you only have the Windows desktop up. No applications running. Load is the temperature when you put stress on the CPU. There are several tools to do this. Intel TAT is probably the best for you. This tool will measure the temperature, and it has a build-in function to put an extreme load on the CPU. If for some reason Intel TAT doesn't work, use Core Temp to measure temperatures, and Orthos to put the load on it.
  2. CPU-Z will indeed tell you the clock speed of the CPU, RAM, and FSB.
  3. With the tools mentioned under 1 and 2, you're all set. The best way to test long-term stability it to let Orthos run for 24 hours (for absolute rock-solid stability) or 8 hours (to be sure your rig is reasonably stable)
  4. It seems like you overclocked already. The goign back and forth between 2279MHz and 2280MHz is just rounding. Not sure what happens with the jump to the higher frequency. What have you done so far to overclock?
  5. 1:1 is used to describe the ration between RAM and CPU (divider). The E6600 runs at an FSB of 1066MHz (or external frequency of 266MHz), so it will run 1:1 with RAM that also runs at an external frequency of 266MHz, which happens to be DDR2 533. This is of course at stock speeds. When you increase your FSB to, say, 400MHz (external), the RAM speed will go up in the same ratio. Thus, at at 400MHz external, your RAM will run at DDR2 800 speeds. However, with a Core 2 Duo rig, you just want the RAM as fast as you can... even if that doesn't mean 1:1, but a ratio in favor of the RAM.
  6. Push that RAM... good DDR2 800 RAM can handle faster speeds like DDR2 1000 speeds or so. Just get a stable setting.
  7. 60C is my max limit for the E6600.

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post #4 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 12:22 PM
 
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As long as you dont overvolt your memory (keep at 2.0-2.1v) or your CPU (stock is up to 1.325v, but it is not recommended to go over 1.45v on air) you should be able to safely OC your system. As for programs, go to the downloads thread and grab Coretemp, CPU-Z, Orthos (or OCCT) and use them when you OC to check temps, verify your OC results and stress the system to check for CPU stability repectively. It is also a good idea to test temps when Orthos or OCCT is running, known as load. That way you can find the max temp the CPU is running at.

edit: As for 1:1, that means that your RAM will match your FSB of the CPU (the memory is double the FSB). Basically the FSB of your CPU is 266MHz. As you increase the FSB to say 400MHz (thus overclocking your CPU), your ram speeds will increase. So if you have the FSB at 400MHz, and your RAM is running at 800MHz, you are effectively running it at 1:1.

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post #5 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chozart View Post
  1. Idle temperature is the temperature of the CPU when you only have the Windows desktop up. No applications running. Load is the temperature when you put stress on the CPU. There are several tools to do this. Intel TAT is probably the best for you. This tool will measure the temperature, and it has a build-in function to put an extreme load on the CPU. If for some reason Intel TAT doesn't work, use Core Temp to measure temperatures, and Orthos to put the load on it.
  2. CPU-Z will indeed tell you the clock speed of the CPU, RAM, and FSB.
  3. With the tools mentioned under 1 and 2, you're all set. The best way to test long-term stability it to let Orthos run for 24 hours (for absolute rock-solid stability) or 8 hours (to be sure your rig is reasonably stable)
  4. It seems like you overclocked already. The goign back and forth between 2279MHz and 2280MHz is just rounding. Not sure what happens with the jump to the higher frequency. What have you done so far to overclock?
  5. 1:1 is used to describe the ration between RAM and CPU (divider). The E6600 runs at an FSB of 1066MHz (or external frequency of 266MHz), so it will run 1:1 with RAM that also runs at an external frequency of 266MHz, which happens to be DDR2 533. This is of course at stock speeds. When you increase your FSB to, say, 400MHz (external), the RAM speed will go up in the same ratio. Thus, at at 400MHz external, your RAM will run at DDR2 800 speeds. However, with a Core 2 Duo rig, you just want the RAM as fast as you can... even if that doesn't mean 1:1, but a ratio in favor of the RAM.
  6. Push that RAM... good DDR2 800 RAM can handle faster speeds like DDR2 1000 speeds or so. Just get a stable setting.
  7. 60C is my max limit for the E6600.
all ive really done to overclock my system is i changed my FSB Frequency to 400mhz and all the voltages are at auto, soo yea heh =/! and also my ram setting(i think) is at 5-5-5-15 idk what that does but i seen a thread that said do that so

Another question, ok so when we say DDR2 800mhz we are talking about the motherboard and how much the motherboard can support right? or are we talking about the actually RAM sticks you buy? because i see some motherboards that say DDR2 800 and i also see RAM Sticks that say DDR2 800, so in overclocking which one would we be talking about?

And lol when im using coretemp to check my temperature for idle, it has 3 temps Core#0, Core#1(which are usually around the same) and tjunction, anyone mind explaining what these are?
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post #6 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 03:10 PM - Thread Starter
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damn i have so many questions sorry guys but uhmm, there is a feature in my bios i forgot waht it was called but it lets me choose the options 1T and 2T what is that? i know it has something to do with ram i believe.

really sorry for bothering you guys =/
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post #7 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 03:14 PM
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i use everest for temps ect...
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post #8 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 03:15 PM
 
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Well, usually it refers to the speed of the ram you buy.


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post #9 of 15 Old 07-26-2007, 04:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkxiao View Post
damn i have so many questions sorry guys but uhmm, there is a feature in my bios i forgot waht it was called but it lets me choose the options 1T and 2T what is that? i know it has something to do with ram i believe.

really sorry for bothering you guys =/
I cant be specifit but 1T vs 2T is the time delay between the ram refresh. lower timings are better. 1T is faster then 2T. But not all RAM can do 1T. There are many factors, one even being the motherboard. For example, the Intel 965 chipset baords cannot run 1T, but the NVIDIA 680i can... if the ram can.

I have G.Skill ram rated at 4-4-4-12 2T, but I have it running 4-3-3-7 1T. 5-5-5-15 is the default that all ram will work at. The best thing to do is run memtest and see if your ram passes without errors each time you tighten timings.

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post #10 of 15 Old 07-27-2007, 09:49 AM
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Yeah, in your case I would not worry too much about 1T v. 2T.

I have a feeling you might have speedstep enabled in the BIOS. If so, disable it. With your FSB at 400MHz, your E6420 should run at 3200MHz. Speedstep is a technology that reduces clockspeed to conserve energy by reducing the multiplier. This is nice for companies and such, but it's in our way when we overclock. When speedstep kicks in, the multi is set at x6, and the resulting clock speed is 2400MHz.

The clockspeeds you mentioned (2279MHz and 3028MHz indicate that you were running an FSB of 379MHz (some rounding).

When you're in the BIOS, disable all those fancy CPU functions... you don't want speedstep for sure, and there is a few more you can live without. If you ever plan to use a virtual machine, then leave Virtualization Technology (or Vanderpool Technology) enabled.

Then, in your case, I would go on and check if your rig will run stable at 3200MHz (FSB = 400MHz). Run Orthos, and let it sit for several hours.

Personally, I do not like ANY auto settings. I would set all standard values (RAM timings, voltages) manually at the default values. Leave the more advanced RAM timings in Auto..that's ok for now. Thus, set your RAM timings manually to default (either 4-4-4-12, or 5-5-5-15, depending on your RAM), and the vdimm (RAM voltage) to default also (likely a value between 1.9 and 2.2v). Do the same to the vcore (CPU voltage), which is 1.35V (and I believe some newer Core 2 Duos have a lower voltage, but at 3200MHz, 1.35V is a good value imo)

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