My CPU FSB is?? - Overclock.net

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 12:26 AM - Thread Starter
733mhz
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I may be missing something, but I have a P4 530J 3.0GHz HT and it has a 800MHz FSB. In Everest it is saying my CPU FSB is 200MHz. Like I said, am I missing something here?



I honestly think it is better to be a failure at something you love than
to be a success at something you hate. - George Burns, 1896-1996, American Comedian

Cforce is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 12:29 AM
Old-skool, yo
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 1130
200MHz is the external system bus. The total front side bus is that x4, 800MHz. When overclocking you increase the "FSB" which is the external system bus. The names mean nothing any more...

Heh, Computers... sozo.gif
I'm back, yo! Be gentle! biggrin.gif
YiffyGriffy is offline  
post #3 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 12:30 AM
4.0ghz
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,674
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 121
I don't know what everything is called, or what everything does really, hopefully more answers to this thread will enlighten me, but here is how I see it:

The FSB that Everest shows as 200mhz is the speed of everything connected to the motherboard, except that which is locked(PCI slots, AGP, etc.) The FSB x the CPU multipler = the clock speed of your processor.

FSB as advertised on the box of your CPU is the HT multiplier x the FSB. This should never exceed 800mhz(as advertised), if you want it to be stable.

Hopefully someone else will explain the function of the FSB as advertised as 800mhz.

amped is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 12:38 AM - Thread Starter
733mhz
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by YiffyGriffy
200MHz is the external system bus. The total front side bus is that x4, 800MHz. When overclocking you increase the "FSB" which is the external system bus. The names mean nothing any more...
Why is the total front side bus 4x the external system bus?



I honestly think it is better to be a failure at something you love than
to be a success at something you hate. - George Burns, 1896-1996, American Comedian

Cforce is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 01:07 AM
1.3ghz
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: California
Posts: 260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Because Intel uses a technology that "quad-pumps" the data, allowing four packets to be transferred across the bus every clock cycle, thus creating a x4 multiplier. HyperTransport works in a similar way on AMDs too, I believe.

socom58 is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 12-29-2005, 01:44 PM
Fold for team 37726
 
Taeric's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 9,830
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 531
Quote:
Originally Posted by amped
I don't know what everything is called, or what everything does really, hopefully more answers to this thread will enlighten me, but here is how I see it:

The FSB that Everest shows as 200mhz is the speed of everything connected to the motherboard, except that which is locked(PCI slots, AGP, etc.) The FSB x the CPU multipler = the clock speed of your processor.

FSB as advertised on the box of your CPU is the HT multiplier x the FSB. This should never exceed 800mhz(as advertised), if you want it to be stable.

Hopefully someone else will explain the function of the FSB as advertised as 800mhz.
The 800 MHz FSB on an Intel can't be compared to the HTT on an AMD system. As is stated in the thread, the 800 MHz is simply the 200 MHz external clock on the system x4 for the quad pumped architecture Intel uses. As you overclock this type of system, the FSB can be pushed to 1000 MHz and beyond on a good system with proper cooling.

As you mentioned, most everything in an Intel system runs off of the external clock except those items which are locked. It's very important to lock PCI and AGP frequencies as those get unstable very quickly when overclocking (typically 10% or less overclock will be unstable on unlocked PCI/AGP).

Help us help you! Read and understand the Terms of Service, the For Sale / Wanted Section Rules, the Online Deals Guidelines, and the Appraisal Forum Rules. Also, list your system specs in your User CP.
If you PM me - Please use a descriptive subject and be patient. I get A LOT of PMs, and there's only so much time in the day to reply to them all.
Helpful tips - Be sure to visit the Site News forum frequently and read announcements and stickies. If you don't keep up with these, you WILL miss out on important info.
Useful links - Overclock.net Professionalism Initiative, Folding FAQ, and Downloads...
Taeric is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off