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post #1 of 4 Old 11-14-2012, 09:44 AM - Thread Starter
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just interested in total information about overclocking memory. such as increasing frequency; does that then meen you have to change timings. also what do you do with RAM timings, do you lower them or increase them. i just don't understand ram timings alltogether :S

i'm going to be getting this RAM for my RIG: http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=MY-143-GL

i assume there will be verry little differance overclocking it anyway. but is it overclockable. and how far is safe? thanks

EDIT: also i can't seem to find a GeIL club at all. is it hard to run a club?
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post #2 of 4 Old 11-14-2012, 12:11 PM
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I'll try and keep this simple, though it is very very complicated, and you should be doing a lot of other reading if you really want to know how computer memory "works".

Memory speed is tied to computer (CPU ) speed. It can be "linked" (matches CPU) or "unlinked" (set independently of CPU speed).

Timings and speed are two different, though interrelated parameters.

The numbers you see for timings (ie. 12-12-12-24) are the number of computer "clock ticks" the memory waits before continuing with the next step of what it has to get done ie. to read/write/move/etc. data. The amount of time the memory has to wait is a fixed, physical limitation of the ICs (the little black chips on memory sticks). This built in, physical limitation CAN be changed by changing the voltage at which the memory operates.

If the memory doesn't wait ling enough for the last step to finish before moving on to the next step, data gets corrupted (crash/lockup/BSOD/data loss/corrupted HDD/etc.). If the memory waits to long, it's just wasting time (clock ticks!) doing nothing.

So, faster (overclocked?) CPUs need "longer" (numerically higher) timings because the "clock ticks" are happening faster.
12 clock ticks at 2 ghz would equal 18 clock ticks at 3 ghz, but, perhaps by increasing the voltage it can finish (whatever it has to do in that step) in 15 clock ticks..

That's about as simple as it gets!
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post #3 of 4 Old 11-14-2012, 12:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

I'll try and keep this simple, though it is very very complicated, and you should be doing a lot of other reading if you really want to know how computer memory "works".
Memory speed is tied to computer (CPU ) speed. It can be "linked" (matches CPU) or "unlinked" (set independently of CPU speed).
Timings and speed are two different, though interrelated parameters.
The numbers you see for timings (ie. 12-12-12-24) are the number of computer "clock ticks" the memory waits before continuing with the next step of what it has to get done ie. to read/write/move/etc. data. The amount of time the memory has to wait is a fixed, physical limitation of the ICs (the little black chips on memory sticks). This built in, physical limitation CAN be changed by changing the voltage at which the memory operates.
If the memory doesn't wait ling enough for the last step to finish before moving on to the next step, data gets corrupted (crash/lockup/BSOD/data loss/corrupted HDD/etc.). If the memory waits to long, it's just wasting time (clock ticks!) doing nothing.
So, faster (overclocked?) CPUs need "longer" (numerically higher) timings because the "clock ticks" are happening faster.
12 clock ticks at 2 ghz would equal 18 clock ticks at 3 ghz, but, perhaps by increasing the voltage it can finish (whatever it has to do in that step) in 15 clock ticks..
That's about as simple as it gets!

wow! that is the best explanation i have came across. understood it and has made a great starting place for learning more on the subject smile.gif thanks alot!

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post #4 of 4 Old 11-14-2012, 04:57 PM
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1.) Don't quote large posts, it just wastes bandwidth.
2.) Glad to help.
3.) Good luck!
4.) See my sig.
5.) My favorite computer question: "Are flames supposed to shoot out of it like that?"

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