Can i impact my current oc to be more stable witha better psu? - Page 3 - Overclock.net

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post #21 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 11:05 AM
 
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Its not accurate till over 40 degrees. Amd released a report stating that temps are figured by an algorithm Not a diode and it is inaccurate until under load over 40 degrees. Beyond that its accurate for anyone ive ever talked to. Although i dont know why u even mentioned it anyways.
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post #22 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmfree88 View Post

Its better then hwmonitor. But yes its within spec. I dont officially trust any software a multimeter is the only way to go. But i feel no need to even check it im fairly certain hwinfo is correct and as u said its within spec so no reason to care anyways tongue.gif.
well you have me wondering how you can tell the ripple when you can only see that with oscilloscope measurements headscratch.gif


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post #23 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 12:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia 
The most common meaning of ripple in electrical science is the small unwanted residual periodic variation of the direct current (dc) output of a power supply which has been derived from an alternating current (ac) source. This ripple is due to incomplete suppression of the alternating waveform within the power supply.
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Originally Posted by wikipedia 
An oscilloscope, previously called an oscillograph,[1][2] and informally known as a scope, CRO (for cathode-ray oscilloscope), or DSO (for the more modern digital storage oscilloscope), is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying signal voltages, usually as a two-dimensional graph of one or more electrical potential differences using the vertical or y‑axis, plotted as a function of time (horizontal or x‑axis). This way, many types of signals can be converted to voltages and displayed.

All it is is a fancy multimeter that can also turn other signals into voltage readouts. You can use OCCT to get graph read-outs of your psu voltages and see the ripple. As I said I wouldn't trust it completely without some direct tool like a multimeter or oscilloscope but its showing ripple similar to what i have seen in reviews. Ripple really is just the difference in voltages and how much/often it fluctuates.
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post #24 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 01:56 PM
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yes and no. if you have a high difference with voltage regulation between little to full load then the rectifier is at fault. if you have high ripple at all loads then the capacitor is at fault. wink.gif

i don't know what review(s) you saw - since i only found 1 for that unit but it rates up there with some of the best with those nippon caps. http://www.chiphell.com/article-3055-4.html


but if want to believe its one of the worst seasonic put out . . . it just might be wink.gif


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post #25 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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I didnt say its a bad psu. All seasonic psu are good quality and usually atleast perform decent. Which seasonic out there still being released is worse? Just because its the worst they have doesn't mean it sucks. Theres far worse psu out there and theres nothing i can say bad about this psu asside from the ripple that in no way has effected its functionality. But in reality its still one of the worst seasonic psu.

Not at my comp but reviews are hard to find. Theres more of the 620w that came out first. Which i also have the 620 so obviously it was still worth buying another one so im not hating on it just saying its one of the worst they offer. Which is a good thing it means they dont sell bad psu. Even there crappy ones are good psu that are better then some brands best.

Also ripple was originally used as the descriptive word to explain the graph readouts of any fluctuating voltages. Later translated to more specific uses by pc enthusiast. The ripple is quite literally the wave you see on a graph that continues to change in a ripple pattern, hence the name. Ripple is ripple is ripple, regardless of the cause.
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post #26 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 06:00 PM
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whoa there buddy,

ripple was used to describe "noise" in electronics long before there were any PC enthusiasts; its NOT the wave but an inpure wave. that is a big difference. there can be two wave forms with the same exact regulation (wave form) but if one has a large amount of ripple, it will damage components.

sorry, you may think you know what you're talking about - and though you are somewhat close - you don't. you take that as an insult but i don't mean it that way.

with that said, i'll just exit stage left. take care.


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post #27 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 06:43 PM
 
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Noise ripples on graphed readouts..... you are just finding ways to tell me im wrong for whatever reason. Again i said later translated by pc enthusiast not originated by. Close to what? I seem to feel as if your making an attempt each time to prove me wrong again for what reason i dont know but each time twisting my words to mean what you want or assume.
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post #28 of 28 Old 11-25-2013, 11:35 PM
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You CANNOT see ripple in a voltage only readout. Ripple is the transference of ac current in the sine wave readout. Which is what looniam was talking about. An oscilloscope shows said voltage at said frequency and then looks for ripples along the wave and there's a readout that shows max min and median wave variations. These you absolutely cannot see without using the correct tool. I don't care how much money you spend on a "multimeter".

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