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Posts by Sin0822

Hey The two capacitors i circled in blue, one of them will give you vccsa the other vccio The caps i circled in green, they should give you vcore. Measure at the back of the caps, one leg at the positive and one at the negative, if you read a negative voltage, change the polarity of the probes. Don't short the caps (but if you don't just remove the short ASAp (get the probes out of their asap) and you should be okay).
Here this might be of interest if you are wondering about the capabilities of the new Skylake iGPUs: https://hubb.blob.core.windows.net/e5888822-986f-45f5-b1d7-08f96e618a7b-published/fe98b14c-347b-49a7-8094-bfe43d16f67c/SPCS003%20-%20SF15_SPCS003_103f.pdf?sv=2014-02-14&sr=c&sig=%2B1P0rZYP%2BgNBEsZzRodFOz7UItxDlkNO7H9eifzDCSI%3D&se=2016-04-09T19%3A30%3A09Z&sp=rwd
Yea, i wasn't being strict with the definition of replacement. For DRAM it's a drop in compliment, which could be considered a partial replacement depending on how it's configured. For the consumer, aka Optane, I do see it as a competitor to modern SSDs. While it lacks the speed and durability to replace DRAM, it doesn't seem to have many downsides compared to NAND other than perhaps cost (or if what Intel promised in terms of speed and reliability don't pan out). Intel...
We aren't arguing replacing DRAM or NAND, we are discussing application scenarios. Xpoint falls in between the two, and as such will be used for a wide variety of different applications. His argument is that XPoint will be used for large data sets, and he is correct, in the tiered hierarchy approach you have CPU cache levels, then DRAM, then XPoint, and then NAND. XPoint's non volatile properties make it very useful for a wide range of applications. I am arguing that based...
Actually, they are already doing it with DRAM, but the cost savings would be immense, not to mention the fact that the bottleneck is still in the network.
Actually, what makes it special as a DRAm replacement is it's density and yes it's non volatile parameters. What makes it special as a NAND replacement is it's speed. However, Intel is looking to target almost everything, including VMs since they are mentioned many times in the presentation below.Here is Intel's...
There is a really good case study on Samsung done by Harvard Business School, may favorite part is when their president or leader at the time (i forgot his position) was so upset with the quality of their products that he took all the factory workers outside along with their products, put them (products) in a pile, and burned 10s of millions of dollars worth of electronics in front of all those who made them, while preaching higher quality like an evangelical preacher....
Well you have to understand that DRAm will still be faster than XPoint, XPoint is meant to increase memory density on the enterprise side since there is a much greater demand for high density DDR4 banks, but NAND is too slow, that is where Xpoint comes in. Right now there are some stacked DRAM solutions coming out to compete with Xpoint. The increased demand for visualization inside organizations, and the increase in CPU core counts, DRAM needs to keep up. Most...
Intel said that it would be in DDR4 DIMMs for "next generation Xeons", that was back at IDF and they said it would launch mid 2016 for the server CPU DIMMs. It would be electrically compatible with DDR4, but only work with these Xeons. I assume they were referencing Broadwell-EP since it fits the general time frame and it wasn't released back then. I was at IDF and i atteneded many of their XPoint seminars, some interesting points other than speed numbers:Optane (SSD) will...
Xpoint will initially be a DDR4 drop in, but later on it will be a NAND replacement.
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