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Posts by Microx256

full 100%. I have IEEE 802.11ac class wireless here, and my 100Mbit internet connection is the bottleneck here. The wireless is capable of putting through hundreds of Mbps. Since you get around 30Mbps, I'd guess you have IEEE 802.11g class wireless (the router, or the device/computer, or both), since it's quite common to get around 20-40Mbps over that, depending on packet sizes and such. To achieve full 60Mbps wireless, you need something like at least IEEE 802.11n class...
Pretty much the path I took. Though, as Lady Fitzgerald said: It's recommended to "distribute" the backups of most important things around, essentially at least one offline-backup, so that malware like cryptolockers won't eat your data, and preferably at least one offsite-backup, in case of fire or burglars stealing your IT stuff. Though, I recommend "upgrading" your backup methodology gradually over time and not instantly jump to extreme backup patterns.And an example of...
Thanks everybody. Looks like I have to split into using multiple different IDE's, or jsut keep struggling with netbeans.. I'll try some of the mentioned IDE's first though. Also, visual studio is out of the question: its horrible IMO for multi platform developing..Unfortunately I haven't followed any "basics" guides because I learned the basics for C, C++, Java and Android at school (as well as using OpenGL with C++). I've learned some advanced topics like GLSL Shaders...
This. In fact, the RAID-0 with two WD Blacks back in the old days had lower performance while dealing with small files compared to a single WD Black. Thus I have a RAID-0 array in only one place: the temporary backup location where I only dump backup images (100-2000GB in size).before someone says RAID-0 is horrible for backups: this "Temporary backups" array is, as said, temporary. stuff like image files temporarily from a physical or virtual computer stored temporarily...
As the title says. Until now I have used Netbeans and it has worked quite nicely, however, it lacks some features and recently it has been acting a little slow when my projects have grown into a lot bigger sizes. I code mainly C/C++, Java (JavaEE with Spring etc), and Android. I also code equally much on Windows and Linux, so the IDE must support both. I use Eclipse at work, and used it for my own projects before switching to Netbeans. I ain't going back there. I do...
How about more than quadruple performance? (yes, I'm talking about SSD's too..)Edit:Also, not to mention: seek times. some games have their resources scattered over into many, many small files, and in such cases the loading times may become more than 10x faster with a SSD. I remember when it was cool when my brand new RAID array of two WD blacks booted windows in 37 seconds and a certain game loaded in about 8 seconds. Now with the SSD times I feel like my OS that boots...
I have two of those at work, and a Asus PB287Q at home, and while both have a decent quality, I would pick the Asus over the Samsung any day. The stand is really wiggly on the Samsung; one little poke on the screen and the screen wobbles around for a while like a hula-hula doll. Not to mention the Asus has more adjustments (height, tilt, and rotates into pivot), where as the Samsung has only tilt, not even height adjustment.
Teamspeak with a decent quality is about 20-40 MB of traffic per hour (depending on activity and quality), so there ain't much to worry about there. Skype should be about the same for voice calls, and for video calls it greatly depends on quality, according to this, a "high-quality" video call is about 175MB per hour. Not really much there either. Games are usually somewhat more bandwidth hungry, though that greatly depends on the game, but in general rarely more than...
The build didn't work, he said nothing about the cpu.. there are other parts than just the cpu that can break in the build you know.. edit:oopsie, almost forgot to answer on the topic As far as I know the only way to test a cpu is to use a mobo with a proper socket, or advanced testing equipment which cost a lot more than a mobo.. You should ask friends if they have a proper mobo and are willing to take their builds apart for a moment of testing, or also some local tech...
if you buy exact same kit, you can use both dualchannel and XMP directly, without the need of any manual timings or so. Also, having more ram will definitely not downgrade the performance, the controller is designed to handle 4 sticks, so having 2 sticks will leave half of the controller unused. The increase in total capacity will just improve performance, because you will have more ram for caching etc. Also the stress on the sticks will go down, because the use will be...
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