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Posts by NihilOC

We can make assumptions about the planet, such as this one likely being tidally locked to it's star, however currently we do not know if it has an atmosphere.If we do manage to obtain information about it's atmosphere we can make pretty accurate assumptions about surface temperatures, and another important point will be how active Proxima Centauri was in the past. There is a chance this planet spent much of it's early life being bombarded with radiation by it's star.
Not all monopolies are illegal, although some are, but illegal isn't really the correct term anyway. They are simply undesirable, which is why competition laws are designed to prevent them from forming in the first place.In cases where they form naturally steps are usually taken to either heavily regulate the monopolised industry to prevent abuse, convert it to a public service or break up the company.That's interesting, although I doubt how they define individual markets...
Microsoft don't have a monopoly, just as Intel don't currently have a monopoly in their data centre products. Microsoft have Linux, Mac and Chrome OS and Intel have Qualcomm, IBM and even NV are competing in that segment now (NV may not make CPUs but every Tesla they sell equates to lost sales for Intel).Technically I guess AMD still sell server chips as well, but meh.Anyway MS/Intel have near complete market share, but there are still companies trying to compete with them...
Currently Intel have an effective monopoly, but due to AMD technically competing with them no one has really done anything about it.Remove AMD and Intel becomes a true monopoly, at which point various regulatory bodies would likely either split Intel up or call for some kind of reform to lower the cost of entry to potential competitors.It is, rather counterintuitively, in Intel's best interests for AMD to continue operating. Possibly not in consumers best interests though.
To be fair some of us want them to fail for equally impersonal reasons, personally I'm torn on the issue but I think if they finally died it might be good for the industry in the long run.The current pseudo-monopoly of Intel is a complete farce and needs to come to an end, but I don't think anyone will do anything about it until AMD finally gives up the ghost.
The problem is that by forcing Intel to license it's patents without fees it would lose any return on investment into R&D, coupled with an inability to recoup R&D costs due to a cap on their profit margins you would effectively cease any R&D by Intel.There is a reason that no regulatory body has ever taken the path you describe, although I admit I don't necessarily disagree with your sentiment regarding corporate greed.Anyway, hopefully Zen will live up to the hype this...
Yeah, US regulators... Forcing the company to split wouldn't be the only solution however, and I don't think it would be the most efficient. If they tried it they'd likely end up splitting Intel's data centre and client computing divisions, and they wouldn't compete anyway.I was thinking more along the lines of more aggressive legislation forcing them to license tech, thus lowering the bar of entry to new competitors. At any rate if AMD failed I very much doubt non-US...
It's a step in the right direction, although at this stage I'm not sure if it would be better for the industry for AMD to return to near-relevance or for AMD to fail and regulators to turn on Intel's resulting monopoly.
Isn't the entire point that some people believe DX12 was in development prior to Mantle? Or is this some other petty NV vs AMD argument?Not that it really matters, this was an interesting read that had absolutely nothing to do with that. I don't think anyone has argued that Mantle wasn't used as a base for Vulkan.
No, the world is ending. Didn't you read the other posts?
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