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Posts by TLHarrell

The 5 amps on the power supply brick that came with the strips will OUTPUT up to 5 amps. This does not mean your strips will draw a full 5A even at full brightness with all chips (white) running. It is probably sized to power 10 meters or more of the strips. It will work fine. Hook up + to 12v (yellow) and - to black. Simple as that. A molex power connector has more than enough power to operate some strips. They draw less than a cold cathode tube will.
Any device will draw the current that it needs. A car battery provides a huge amount of current at 12 volts. A wall wart will provide 12v at maybe 500mA. Both would power your LED strip just fine. The problem comes when you connect to higher voltage than it can take, which will let out all the magic blue smoke, or you connect far too many things to a power supply and cause it to fail. Simply wire up a molex to barrel plug on 12v and plug in the little controller box.
DVI/HDMI are not pin/signal compatible with SVideo. You'll need an active converter. You should be able to get one from Amazon, eBay, etc.
No issues at all. NZXT even has magnets that keep the front door closed. Magnets around computers are not a problem. Might have been way back in the day, but not now.
As in you want to solder the PSU directly to the main board in the netbook? I wouldn't want to do that. It'll take a normal soldering iron a very long time to heat soak that connection, and if it's in an area with other parts you risk causing them to reflow. If the connection is on the charger side of things, you're dealing with much larger parts. Shouldn't be too hard. I recommend practicing on some junk hardware first just to get the hang of soldering, and seeing how...
(I added in the part about the diode not just for you, but for others who may not know.) I would not recommend making modifications to a Molex connector to provide anything other than the 12v and 5v connections per the pinout. You seriously risk having a 'duh' moment at a later time and possibly plugging in something incorrectly. Just measure the voltage at the pins on the board. They should be within the voltage range for single LEDs. If not, add the resistors to your...
I'm pretty sure Apple's solution uses the backlight panel to make the logo glow. Your results may vary. I would recommend getting a PDF of the service manual for your laptop and checking out the disassembly instructions for the screen. Get the part number for the backlight section and see if you can get pictures of the back face of it through Google Images. If not, send an email to MSI and see if you can get more specific information about the backlight, whether it emits...
If you have a multimeter available, I'd recommend taking a reading from the pins on the LED station. It appears to have resistors built in on the back side of the board, one for each of the LED plugs. If you don't have a multimeter, I'd recommend getting one from Harbor Freight. They're like $8 in store without a coupon, and sometimes with coupon you can get for free. With a multimeter, you should get a voltage reading around 2.8-3.2 volts on each of those sets of pins....
Pretty well covered all over the site for those who can use the search button. I've answered this numerous times myself in extreme detail, and the question is always asked again. Unless it gets stickied somewhere that it can easily be found, I think it may prove to be a waste of time.
Perfectly illustrated. Yes, just like that.
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