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Posts by unclewebb

On the 8700K, all active cores are locked to the same multiplier. When only a single core is active, a lot of monitoring software does not do a great job of showing what multiplier the CPU is using. Some information that monitoring software will show you can be completely misleading if you do not understand this.
That temperature spec that Intel published is measured at the geometric center of the heatspreader that covers the CPU cores. It is a useless number for most users unless a person plans to hack up their CPU with a Dremel and mount a calibrated temp sensor at that location. When significantly overclocking one of these, you will lose stability long before the core temperature gets anywhere near the maximum safe temperature so no worries.It is an Extreme processor. That...
For Turbo Boost to work properly, you only need to enable C3. For maximum power savings, you can enable all of them including C1E and C8. These CPUs are extremely efficient when all of the C States are enabled. Never trust an Auto setting in the bios. When overclocking or using XMP profiles, some manufacturers think that you are no longer interested in power savings so they will disable the C States. Turbo Boost has worked like this since the first Core i was...
At default settings, the way turbo boost works is the inactive cores have to be able to go into one of the deeper C States in order for the active core or cores to be able to use the highest turbo multiplier. My guess is that you have disabled your C States in the bios. This will limit an 8700K to the 43 multiplier when it is at default settings. You need to go into the bios and enable at least the core C3 or core C6 or core C7 C States to enable the maximum multiplier....
https://ark.intel.com/products/126685/Intel-Core-i5-8600K-Processor-9M-Cache-up-to-4_30-GHz 36 is the default multiplier for a Core i5-8600K. Intel Turbo Boost has to be enabled to use any multiplier greater than 36. Check your bios for that setting. When overclocking, some manufacturers will enable Turbo Boost for you automatically. Most Asus boards make you do this manually.
You are correct. Intel typically sets the thermal shutdown temperature 25°C to 30°C beyond the throttling temperature.It is not a good idea to operate most intel CPUs beyond a peak core temperature of 100°C for any length of time. Thermal throttling works so well that unless the heatsink falls off, one should never have to worry about going beyond 100°C.
The Xeon W3680 is definitely overclockable. http://www.overclock.net/t/1426601/xeon-w3680-playing-around-trying-to-get-above-5-0ghz-tips-11-3-cb-score They have an unlocked multiplier so you can leave the BCLK at 133.3 MHz and just increase the multiplier to go faster. Have you tried using ThrottleStop to overclock this CPU? Click on the ThrottleStop TRL button, Turbo Ratio Limits, and as long as Dell did not set any sort of lock, you should be able to use this program...
The 8700K uses Intel Turbo Boost to reach any speed beyond the default 3.7 GHz. https://ark.intel.com/products/126684/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-Processor-12M-Cache-up-to-4_70-GHz There are 2 power limits you need to set to control this feature. Intel XTU lists these as Turbo Boost Power Max and the Turbo Boost Short Power Max. Your screenshot shows that you have the long term limit set to 95 Watts which is the default setting for an 8700K. When your CPU reaches this limit,...
If this is for a Dell laptop, you have to use a Dell adapter and that your bios supports this Dell adapter. Some Dell laptops will not work properly if you plug in an unsupported adapter and it can limit you from using the full 200 Watts. The QX9300 is a power hungry chip. Overclocking while on battery power is usually not a good idea.
The Intel B250 chipset does not support overclocking. For overclocking you need the Z series chipset. https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z270-H270-Q270-Q250-B250---What-is-the-Difference-876/
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