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[Ars] How do you use 1Gbps Internet links? Chattanooga residents find out - Page 2

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by the.FBI View Post
Its unfortunate that the pricing is so high, the article stated that the upgrades weren't actually that expensive for the company and I doubt the upkeep costs are much more expensive than normal. If this service could drop to $100/mo with no caps it would catch on like wildfire, especially if the upload speed was the same. 1080p real time streaming anyone?
This is what we would literally need for services like "Onlive" to actually be successful.
post #12 of 23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto View Post
This is what we would literally need for services like "Onlive" to actually be successful.
Onlive is okay. There's actually some lagging but that may be my internet. It's nice for trying out some games though. They don't have the biggest library but lets you do 30 minute trials (30 min? That's kind of weird to me).
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post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by -relk- View Post
Very well written. At first when i saw the $350 price tag i reered in horror. But from your logic and math it turns out to be a pretty killer deal! If only they start to offer it in Canada now...

EDIT: To download an entire movie in less than a minute would be pretty sweet
Exactly! The knee-jerk reaction is "HOLY TURTLES, THAT IS A LOT!". I know I thought the exact same thing, myself. But, after thinking it over, given the right situation, this could easily be a wonderful chance for a lot of people to save a LOT of money.

I hope they start offering it everywhere in the Americas, my friend!
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonz™ View Post
Now only to find a job in Chattanooga...
Work for Alstom

It is a great step forward, and hopefully we will soon see all of the current infrastructure upgraded.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guswut View Post
Man, only 350$ a month for 1,000mbps? That means it costs you 0.35$ per each megabit of transfer bandwidth... {long and very good post} ...
Great post, +rep

Now all I have to do is buy an apartment building in Chattanooga and see if my old company will take me back...
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post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guswut View Post
Man, only 350$ a month for 1,000mbps? That means it costs you 0.35$ per each megabit of transfer bandwidth. To compare, Comcast offers the following services at the following costs at my home address...

Economy, 1.5mbps, 26.95$
Performance, 12mpbs, 44.95$
Blast, 20mbps, 54.95$
Extreme, 50mbps, 99.95$

This translates to being 17.97$ per megabit with economy, 3.75$ per megabit for performance, 2.75$ per megabit for blast, and 2.00$ per megabit for Extreme.

DSL costs and offers as follows:

Direct Basic, .768mbp, 29.95$
Direct Express, 1.5mbps, 35$
Direct Pro, 3mbps, 40$
Direct Elite, 6mpbs, 45$

From there, we can see that basic costs 39$ per megabit, express costs 23.34$ per megabit, pro is 13.34$ per megabit, and elite is 7.5$ per megabit. U-verse is not offered at my location.

Simply put, it's cheaper to buy bandwidth in bulk, obviously. The best usages I could think of would be, for example, an apartment owner. If the apartment owner owned nine units, and lived in the tenth, they could specify that internet access is covered in the rent, add 35$ to the rent, and then pay 35$ to have the 350$ needed to cover the cost. They'd have to have their apartment wired up for cat5 access from a source room, but they would easily make money off of the deal. And, besides that, they'd have a gigabit line on tap, then. Ten families are highly unlikely to be able to fully tap a gigabit connection. And, honestly, they could limit the connections in all of the other housing units to 20/20, advertise that you get free internet access at twenty megabits up and down, and save every person involved money (remember that 20mbps, through comcast, is 54.95$ If it cost the resident 35$ extra on their rent, that would mean they'd save 19.95$ a month, or 239.4 a year.)

It makes even more sense for larger apartment complexes. For example, in a one hundred unit apartment complex, the cost, per resident, if they were paying it Dutch, would be 3.50$ a month. That would give each resident, assuming bandwidth was divided at the central networking location, ten megabits up and ten megabits down. Comcast offers a twelve megabit connection for 44.95$. That means the savings in cost would be 41.45$. Factoring in the difference in speed, assuming the connection is limited internally, it would be a difference of 34.54$. The saving, there, is insane. And that is assuming you're limited to a level of bandwidth that means everyone can use their full connection, both up and down, at once, without overlap. If everyone was allowed 50mbps, you'd likely have 95 families not even tapping a tenth of that, while power users would be getting insane speed, and not clogging up the network with long file transfers.

Of course, in these cases, the owner would need to deal with some IT issues, such as subnetting each house, traffic filtering/caps, and most likely they'd want to offer wireless internet access (either in each resident's home, on their own internal subnet, or an entirely different subnet which wouldn't allow for internal network sharing, of course, but would be easier to deal with and not require a wireless access point for each unit [although, honestly, wireless access points are cheap enough that it wouldn't be all that hard to do exactly that. But wireless ALL over the building that everyone can use would be nice indeed.]). Anyways, hopefully Google can start getting the ball rolling further!
I applaud this post.
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post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by redfroth View Post
I tell you the telecoms in the US would scream bloody murder if more cities used publicly owned organizations to upgrade thier communities with Gbps connections. It would finally put them in their place and have to make them compete.

Maybe Google will save our internet from AT&T and Comcast.
Maybe because its a unlevel playing field?

Municipalities are the reason for less competition, they charge high amounts of these companies to lay down the lines and they have no guarantee they will recuperate the investment.

I specifically am affected by these low life politicians that cause this due to the fact the neighborhood across the street has FIOS and we don't because we are another city.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guswut View Post
Man, only 350$ a month for 1,000mbps? That means it costs you 0.35$ per each megabit of transfer bandwidth. To compare, Comcast offers the following services at the following costs at my home address...

Economy, 1.5mbps, 26.95$
Performance, 12mpbs, 44.95$
Blast, 20mbps, 54.95$
Extreme, 50mbps, 99.95$

This translates to being 17.97$ per megabit with economy, 3.75$ per megabit for performance, 2.75$ per megabit for blast, and 2.00$ per megabit for Extreme.

DSL costs and offers as follows:

Direct Basic, .768mbp, 29.95$
Direct Express, 1.5mbps, 35$
Direct Pro, 3mbps, 40$
Direct Elite, 6mpbs, 45$

From there, we can see that basic costs 39$ per megabit, express costs 23.34$ per megabit, pro is 13.34$ per megabit, and elite is 7.5$ per megabit. U-verse is not offered at my location.

Simply put, it's cheaper to buy bandwidth in bulk, obviously. The best usages I could think of would be, for example, an apartment owner. If the apartment owner owned nine units, and lived in the tenth, they could specify that internet access is covered in the rent, add 35$ to the rent, and then pay 35$ to have the 350$ needed to cover the cost. They'd have to have their apartment wired up for cat5 access from a source room, but they would easily make money off of the deal. And, besides that, they'd have a gigabit line on tap, then. Ten families are highly unlikely to be able to fully tap a gigabit connection. And, honestly, they could limit the connections in all of the other housing units to 20/20, advertise that you get free internet access at twenty megabits up and down, and save every person involved money (remember that 20mbps, through comcast, is 54.95$ If it cost the resident 35$ extra on their rent, that would mean they'd save 19.95$ a month, or 239.4 a year.)

It makes even more sense for larger apartment complexes. For example, in a one hundred unit apartment complex, the cost, per resident, if they were paying it Dutch, would be 3.50$ a month. That would give each resident, assuming bandwidth was divided at the central networking location, ten megabits up and ten megabits down. Comcast offers a twelve megabit connection for 44.95$. That means the savings in cost would be 41.45$. Factoring in the difference in speed, assuming the connection is limited internally, it would be a difference of 34.54$. The saving, there, is insane. And that is assuming you're limited to a level of bandwidth that means everyone can use their full connection, both up and down, at once, without overlap. If everyone was allowed 50mbps, you'd likely have 95 families not even tapping a tenth of that, while power users would be getting insane speed, and not clogging up the network with long file transfers.

Of course, in these cases, the owner would need to deal with some IT issues, such as subnetting each house, traffic filtering/caps, and most likely they'd want to offer wireless internet access (either in each resident's home, on their own internal subnet, or an entirely different subnet which wouldn't allow for internal network sharing, of course, but would be easier to deal with and not require a wireless access point for each unit [although, honestly, wireless access points are cheap enough that it wouldn't be all that hard to do exactly that. But wireless ALL over the building that everyone can use would be nice indeed.]). Anyways, hopefully Google can start getting the ball rolling further!
Non-bundled prices? How Goebbels of you.
post #17 of 23
We need this in Los angeles there are tons more customers for that kind of net here.
I mean i pay like 60 bucks for 25/4 connection here, Honestly even 1000mbps is not needed what we need for personal use is around 100/10 for like 50 bucks. that would be great.
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post #18 of 23
Is what Guswut proposed even legal?(I guess I shouldn't say illegal, but rather breaking ToS) I'm thinking the Cable company probably have some clauses in the ToS against doing something like that. As people could potentially profit from doing that and/or the cable company could potentially lose customers/money. They probably do offer such services, the ones in Hotels and the like but I'm sure those are business packages and come with a whole other written contract and a heftier price.

I could be wrong, but I find it very hard to believe they would allow someone to profit while they lose. Either way, it was a great idea and will probably happen quite often, just without the ISP knowing.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guswut View Post

Simply put, it's cheaper to buy bandwidth in bulk, obviously. The best usages I could think of would be, for example, an apartment owner.
That plan breaks down when you read the service agreement . At least for Comcast any pretty much any other large provider. Did you know on Comcast you are supposed to be paying extra for hooking two PC's up to the modem in your home, much less selling the internet to multiple houses? Most everyone gets away with it since the router shows up as one device to the modem.

I don't know if they offer bulk packages to apartment owners at all... everyone I know with an apartment gets service directly through Comcast, not their landlord.
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post #20 of 23
$0.35 per megabit is crazy cheap if the speeds are real and the network is any good. If people max out that connection 24/7, this company will go broke pretty quickly. Transit is at lowest around $1 per megabit(Cogent, though their prices have been going up).
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