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post #11 of 16
Why waste money on this while you can build 10 2600k rigs and x5 the performance for the same price?
    
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post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kremtok View Post
Why do you say that? Isn't massive parallel capability far more important than clock speed in a server environment? For an example I look to the current Intel and AMD 8-core offerings; they are all relatively low clock speed compared to what we see in enthusiast or even mainstream processors. Opteron 12-core processers are clocked even lower. Surely this must be for a well-thought-out reason.
Depends on your workload.

Personally, I just ordered a server with 2x X5690. The calculations been done will only generate 10-20 threads so I need pure clock speed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by robwadeson View Post
Why waste money on this while you can build 10 2600k rigs and x5 the performance for the same price?
1) 2600K are not for server environments.
2) Try writing code that loads all 10 rigs well.... especially code that requires low latency.
Edited by DuckieHo - 4/28/11 at 8:17pm
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post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kremtok View Post
Why do you say that? Isn't massive parallel capability far more important than clock speed in a server environment? For an example I look to the current Intel and AMD 8-core offerings; they are all relatively low clock speed compared to what we see in enthusiast or even mainstream processors. Opteron 12-core processers are clocked even lower. Surely this must be for a well-thought-out reason.
nope. clock speed is usually more important(until you hit your I/O limits)...

parallel capability is useful if you have tasks that are parallelizable:

lets say encoding a video cannot be split into parallel tasks
one video takes 10 minutes to encode on one core, ten videos can finish in ten minutes on ten cores in parallel

but if you want to have ONE video and you want it to be done faster, and you can't split that video into ten segments...you still have to wait ten minutes

a faster core can finish it faster

therefore, a higher clock speed on one core will finish one video in 8 minutes.. and you would want that capability
Edited by paperwastage - 4/28/11 at 10:01pm
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post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Depends on your workload.
I'm quite certain that's true. I was just wondering out loud why low clock speed is the rule for the higher-end (read: most expensive) server processors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paperwastage View Post
nope. clock speed is usually more important(until you hit your I/O limits)...

parallel capability is useful if you have tasks that are parallelizable:

lets say encoding a video cannot be split into parallel tasks
one video takes 10 minutes to encode on one core, ten videos can finish in ten minutes on ten cores in parallel

but if you want to have ONE video and you want it to be done faster, and you can't split that video into ten segments...you still have to wait ten minutes

a faster core can finish it faster

therefore, a higher clock speed on one core will finish one video in 8 minutes.. and you would want that capability
I'm certain that's right, within a few limitations, but we're clearly talking about a different type of work product here. No system destined to be powered by one of these chips is likely to be designed as a video encoder. More likely a mail or file server for a large company.
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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kremtok View Post


I'm quite certain that's true. I was just wondering out loud why low clock speed is the rule for the higher-end (read: most expensive) server processors.

Well most of the high-end server processors (in $$) are enterprise-grade. In the enterprise, heat is definitely an issue that costs tons of money in cooling (electric power) in datacenters. So lower clockspeed would limit the heat generation for those servers.

While additionally, most enterprise workloads take advantage of multi-threading as databases, web requests, etc... even the batch processings can easily made multi-threaded to a certain extent. And of course virtualization in the enterprise is crucial and fully tkes advantage of the high number of cores.

So, for this market, the strategy of Intel and AMD (and Sun Oracle with SPARC, and IBM with Power7) are similar and follow this logic.

Some low-threaded Intel enterprise processors would be the X5687 with 3.6Ghz... other philosophy here.
Edited by mspencer - 2/4/12 at 9:12pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Master Chief View Post

$7,275.00
No thank you

$4616 you mean
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