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Galvanic Corrosion question

post #1 of 9
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An old post on this forum led me to a site. It says that in harsh high humidity environments (I imagine a water loop would loosely fit this category) galvanic corrosion can occur with only a anodic index difference of .15V. Silver and copper/nickel are .15V away or farther from each other. Does this mean that a silver kill coil could result in galvanic corrosion? Thoughts anyone?
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post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by imblind View Post
An old post on this forum led me to a site. It says that in harsh high humidity environments (I imagine a water loop would loosely fit this category) galvanic corrosion can occur with only a anodic index difference of .15V. Silver and copper/nickel are .15V away or farther from each other. Does this mean that a silver kill coil could result in galvanic corrosion? Thoughts anyone?
Yes but galvanic corrosion is dependant on how much water runs through it and it needs some kind of acidity or basing mineralization. None of which occurs if you use a good filtered softened source of water.
It's like boat propellors and drive shaft couplers. In ocean water its big deal cause of the salt and mineral content but on lake nothing.
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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hephasteus View Post
Yes but galvanic corrosion is dependant on how much water runs through it and it needs some kind of acidity or basing mineralization. None of which occurs if you use a good filtered softened source of water.
It's like boat propellors and drive shaft couplers. In ocean water its big deal cause of the salt and mineral content but on lake nothing.
I think corrosion can probably occur in the loop in the same way that even de-ionized water can realistically short out a motherboard. The truth is that there is probably some "gunk" in the loop due to residue in reservoirs or radiators. I think it is fairly common sense to avoid mixing copper/aluminum, my question is if that also applies to copper/silver.
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post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by imblind View Post
I think corrosion can probably occur in the loop in the same way that even de-ionized water can realistically short out a motherboard. The truth is that there is probably some "gunk" in the loop due to residue in reservoirs or radiators. I think it is fairly common sense to avoid mixing copper/aluminum, my question is if that also applies to copper/silver.
I've never seen somebody have an issue with it, and I've never had an issue.


For that reason, even if it does happen, I would expect it to be many years before it becomes a problem.
    
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post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by imblind View Post
I think corrosion can probably occur in the loop in the same way that even de-ionized water can realistically short out a motherboard. The truth is that there is probably some "gunk" in the loop due to residue in reservoirs or radiators. I think it is fairly common sense to avoid mixing copper/aluminum, my question is if that also applies to copper/silver.
Well yes. Copper and silver are found together when mining. The thing is copper and aluminum don't "play" together from a materials science standpoint. But copper and silver do. You can stack a copper bar on a silver bar and store them in a hot room for years and the copper will mix atoms into the silver and vice versa big time. This is called electrum because it used to be used as a conductor for many years a well as coin and jewlry. So all your going to do is turn the 2 pieces into a closer to natural state which will affect properties somewhat but none of that means anything in a loop. The silver connections may take on a bit of copperish hue and the copper connection may take on a bit more silvery shine but that's it. It's not going to corrode because any atom that dislodges will get sucked into either materials matrix easily.
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post #6 of 9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hephasteus View Post
Well yes. Copper and silver are found together when mining. The thing is copper and aluminum don't "play" together from a materials science standpoint. But copper and silver do. You can stack a copper bar on a silver bar and store them in a hot room for years and the copper will mix atoms into the silver and vice versa big time. This is called electrum because it used to be used as a conductor for many years a well as coin and jewlry. So all your going to do is turn the 2 pieces into a closer to natural state which will affect properties somewhat but none of that means anything in a loop. The silver connections may take on a bit of copperish hue and the copper connection may take on a bit more silvery shine but that's it. It's not going to corrode because any atom that dislodges will get sucked into either materials matrix easily.
Interesting. I'm a bit out of my element here...thanks for the info.
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post #7 of 9
this is why i like red line waterwetter... and pure water...
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post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by imblind View Post
An old post on this forum led me to a site. It says that in harsh high humidity environments (I imagine a water loop would loosely fit this category) galvanic corrosion can occur with only a anodic index difference of .15V. Silver and copper/nickel are .15V away or farther from each other. Does this mean that a silver kill coil could result in galvanic corrosion? Thoughts anyone?
I like that site. But if you read it carefully, the .15V is for the harshest environment, like outdoor seawater. For a controlled environment of distilled, which starts non-conductive and never gets as electrolytic as seawater, consider it .50V. So I don't think the site or table are wrong.

Other posters have reminded us that seawater is different than fresh water (our loop is more like a lake than the ocean). And that reports of galvanic corrosion in the absence of Aluminum in water-cooling are rare.

So I think you were on the right track but just over-estimated the harshness of our loop coolant. That's a long way of saying everyone is correct and to avoid Aluminum.

Here is another source if you want read more. Good luck.
    
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post #9 of 9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicfan View Post
I like that site. But if you read it carefully, the .15V is for the harshest environment, like outdoor seawater. For a controlled environment of distilled, which starts non-conductive and never gets as electrolytic as seawater, consider it .50V. So I don't think the site or table are wrong.

Other posters have reminded us that seawater is different than fresh water (our loop is more like a lake than the ocean). And that reports of galvanic corrosion in the absence of Aluminum in water-cooling are rare.

So I think you were on the right track but just over-estimated the harshness of our loop coolant. That's a long way of saying everyone is correct and to avoid Aluminum.

Here is another source if you want read more. Good luck.
I was thinking about that. For harsh conditions it says that it needs something conductive in the water (which it's true de-ionized water would have little of, but it also seemed to mention temperature changes. Well, loops do go through temperatures changes....
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