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C2D voltage question

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
So I have had my Core 2 Duo E7600 Stable up to 4.26GHz, but it required just about 1.5V. I brought it down to 4.10GHz and was able to reduce the voltage to 1.46V. I am running my memory in sync and would like to keep it that way. Rather than change the DRAM divider to clock the memory higher, I would like to raise the FSB and lower the multiplier, keeping the final clock speed constant. My question is will this change my system stability, even though the final clock speed will remain the same? Will the higher bus speed require more juice? I am not sure that I am comfortable running more than 1.46V 24/7. By the way my system runs very cool. Right now at load it's only 56- 57C. This cooler is amazing!!!! I am not sure that there is an advantage to raising the bus speed and lowering the multiplier. Can someone elaborate? Thanks!
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asus P8Z68-V Radeon HD4670 Samsung MV-3V2G3D/US low profile  
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Samsung HD503HI  Samsung 830 Series SSD 128 GB Samsung HD155UI Lite-on IHOS-104 Blu Ray 
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Thermalright Silver Arrow Win 7 Professional HP LP2065 20" LCD Cherry MX Board 3.0 
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My System
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asus P8Z68-V Radeon HD4670 Samsung MV-3V2G3D/US low profile  
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung HD503HI  Samsung 830 Series SSD 128 GB Samsung HD155UI Lite-on IHOS-104 Blu Ray 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermalright Silver Arrow Win 7 Professional HP LP2065 20" LCD Cherry MX Board 3.0 
PowerCaseAudio
Antec Earthwatts EA380D Fractal Design Arc Midi Klipsch THX 
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post #2 of 4
1.46V is a bit high for 24/7 use for that CPU, but some have run as much 24/7 for a year or two.

In general, a lower multiplier/higher FSB will be a bit better, as it'll speed up the rest of the system too with the higher FSB, and in my own experience, a lower multiplier sometimes needs a tad less voltage for the CPU (but it's usually not by alot, and then it's a trade-off as the Northbridge needs more voltage).
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
You are female? I thought all computer nerds were guys? Lolz! Hmmm that is interesting. I will have to do some more research on the lower multiplier vs higher bus speed. I'm looking at your sig, and I see that you hit 4GHz with only 1.24V? Wow. What is your FSB and multi? It seems that there is some debate as to acceptable voltage levels. Some argue it's the heat which is detrimental and others claim voltage is the culprit.
My System
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asus P8Z68-V Radeon HD4670 Samsung MV-3V2G3D/US low profile  
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung HD503HI  Samsung 830 Series SSD 128 GB Samsung HD155UI Lite-on IHOS-104 Blu Ray 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermalright Silver Arrow Win 7 Professional HP LP2065 20" LCD Cherry MX Board 3.0 
PowerCaseAudio
Antec Earthwatts EA380D Fractal Design Arc Midi Klipsch THX 
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My System
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asus P8Z68-V Radeon HD4670 Samsung MV-3V2G3D/US low profile  
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung HD503HI  Samsung 830 Series SSD 128 GB Samsung HD155UI Lite-on IHOS-104 Blu Ray 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermalright Silver Arrow Win 7 Professional HP LP2065 20" LCD Cherry MX Board 3.0 
PowerCaseAudio
Antec Earthwatts EA380D Fractal Design Arc Midi Klipsch THX 
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post #4 of 4
It's both heat and voltage that do damage, but both combined make it worse. Voltage itself, regardless of temperature, will eventually result in electromigration failure (you can Google/Wikipedia for the technical description which eludes me, I just know it means the end of the line). Again, this is a matter of when, not if, and more voltage speeds the process up. This is regardless of temperatures, however, more heat adds to the effect speeding it up even more. Heat then also has it's own dangers as, well, temperatures. In the end, it's both, and the combination of them, at least that's what I've gathered from seeing many discussions on the two.

As far as I know, 1.4V was the most common rule to go by with the 45nm Core 2s. I think some others seem to say they've run their 45nm Core 2s a bit over 1.4V 24/7 for a year or two fine, but I cannot speak for that. As always, the limits aren't really set in stone (other than Intel's claimed limit which is 1.3625V). I'd personally try and stay below 1.4V myself, along with keeping temperatures down, but if you're getting temperatures that good at 1.45V, then who knows.

My FSB is 400MHz, with the multiplier at 10 (default). I could probably raise the FSB and drop the multiplier, but I like keeping the RAM/Northbridge voltages/temperatures down.
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