Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Technology and Science News › [Skyline NewsRoom] Air France 447 Memory Unit Found
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Skyline NewsRoom] Air France 447 Memory Unit Found - Page 5

post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras;13902441 
Wait, are you saying they are completely retarded and couldn't tell that they were suddenly pointing towards space and slowly falling and didn't notice it? You would think that they would notice even with their nose pointed up that the plane was dropping, hence the clouds moving past them even in a storm. Something is fishy about all this.

Airbus Records of other PITOT Failures show that Crews are very slow to respond to Auto Throttle Loss, meaning that they are very slow to manually take control of throttle, thus they stall with no way out.
post #42 of 49
Oceanic flight 815
Full Steam Ahead!
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2500k Intel ES HD5670 OC 1333CL6 2x2GB 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Western Digital 2.5TB Windows Seven x64 Hanns-G LED 22 500w 
Case
Lian Li (modded) 
  hide details  
Reply
Full Steam Ahead!
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2500k Intel ES HD5670 OC 1333CL6 2x2GB 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Western Digital 2.5TB Windows Seven x64 Hanns-G LED 22 500w 
Case
Lian Li (modded) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #43 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cokezone View Post
Oceanic flight 815
LOL, No xD...
post #44 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelthras View Post
Wait, are you saying they are completely retarded and couldn't tell that they were suddenly pointing towards space and slowly falling and didn't notice it? You would think that they would notice even with their nose pointed up that the plane was dropping, hence the clouds moving past them even in a storm. Something is fishy about all this.
Also remember that all Computerized Parts of the Aircraft were shut down at nearly the same time...
post #45 of 49
I would imagine that in a storm you are robbed of any fixed point of reference, so that would make it hard to feel which way the plane was actually going. Also it can mess with your perception of which way is up. I realise that there is instrumentation to give the orientation of the horizon, but it is amazing how convincing your mind can get sometimes.

Please note, I am not a pilot, nor have I even been up front in a flying aircraft, I am basing this on being in a whiteout on a mountain. Without a fixed visual reference it is easy to loose sense of the vertical to the point where I have descended 50m down a slope before realising it (we were supposed to be on a level ridge). I have also stumbled over a small rock which I thought was a large boulder a lot further away. It might sound stupid to you, but it happens all too often.


Also the Pitot tubes (not capitalised, they are named after Henri Pitot) are sometimes used to give an altitude reading as well as air speed (Pitot Static systems). If they were iced up this could have caused problems with the altitude indicator as well as the air speed indicator.

As for it all being the fault of Airbus, they only make the plane. There are lots of things that could have caused failure, from poor maintenance to freak occurrences. A couple of examples are the AeroPeru flight 603, where tape was left over some of the Pitot ports by a cleaner, or the Birgenair flight 301, where it was suspected that insects had made a nest which blocked the Pitot tubes.
Edited by GingerJohn - 6/16/11 at 11:39pm
Main
(21 items)
 
HTPC
(10 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2550k P8P67 Pro Sapphire HD 7950 G.Skill RipJaws X 1600 Cas 9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Corsair Force 120 WD Blue 500GB WD Caviar Green 1TB XSPC RayStorm 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
RX240 MCR 220 EK 7950 Copper Acetal  DDC-1T 
OSMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Windows 7 64-bit Dell U2311H Oculus Rift DK2 Ducky Shine 3 MX Brown 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Corsair TX 750W CoolerMaster CM690 II G500 Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 
Audio
Asus Xonar DX 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
A10-6800K Gigabyte GA-F2A85XN-WIFI G Skill 1600 CAS9 Kingston SSD Now 60GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD Caviar Blue 1TB LG Slim Blu-Ray player Silverstone NT06-PRO  Widows 7 Home Premium 
PowerCase
Silverstone Sfx Series ST45SF 450W Silverstone SG05 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(21 items)
 
HTPC
(10 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2550k P8P67 Pro Sapphire HD 7950 G.Skill RipJaws X 1600 Cas 9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Corsair Force 120 WD Blue 500GB WD Caviar Green 1TB XSPC RayStorm 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
RX240 MCR 220 EK 7950 Copper Acetal  DDC-1T 
OSMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Windows 7 64-bit Dell U2311H Oculus Rift DK2 Ducky Shine 3 MX Brown 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Corsair TX 750W CoolerMaster CM690 II G500 Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 
Audio
Asus Xonar DX 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
A10-6800K Gigabyte GA-F2A85XN-WIFI G Skill 1600 CAS9 Kingston SSD Now 60GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD Caviar Blue 1TB LG Slim Blu-Ray player Silverstone NT06-PRO  Widows 7 Home Premium 
PowerCase
Silverstone Sfx Series ST45SF 450W Silverstone SG05 
  hide details  
Reply
post #46 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerJohn View Post
I would imagine that in a storm you are robbed of any fixed point of reference, so that would make it hard to feel which way the plane was actually going. Also it can mess with your perception of which way is up. I realise that there is instrumentation to give the orientation of the horizon, but it is amazing how convincing your mind can get sometimes.

Please note, I am not a pilot, nor have I even been up front in a flying aircraft, I am basing this on being in a whiteout on a mountain. Without a fixed visual reference it is easy to loose sense of the vertical to the point where I have descended 50m down a slope before realising it (we were supposed to be on a level ridge). I have also stumbled over a small rock which I thought was a large boulder a lot further away. It might sound stupid to you, but it happens all too often.


Also the Pitot tubes (not capitalised, they are named after Henri Pitot) are sometimes used to give an altitude reading as well as air speed (Pitot Static systems). If they were iced up this could have caused problems with the altitude indicator as well as the air speed indicator.

As for it all being the fault of Airbus, they only make the plane. There are lots of things that could have caused failure, from poor maintenance to freak occurrences. A couple of examples are the AeroPeru flight 603, where tape was left over some of the Pitot ports by a cleaner, or the Birgenair flight 301, where it was suspected that insects had made a nest which blocked the Pitot tubes.
According to Errors sent to Airbus HQ by the A330 All Airspeed Indicators were inoperable.

Have you ever heard of Supercooled Water? That was intense enough to negate the PITOT's Heaters and Freeze 2 PITOTs Up, once the PITOT was iced, All computerized functions were shut down, Including Auto Pilot, and Auto throttle, The PITOT failure was confirmed by a Message Aribus HQ recieved from the Airbus's Computer sent the message that PITOT 1 and 2 were no longer functioning, the Pilots failed to take control of the throttle in time and they were brought down by an extreme unrecoverable stall.
post #47 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerJohn View Post
I would imagine that in a storm you are robbed of any fixed point of reference, so that would make it hard to feel which way the plane was actually going. Also it can mess with your perception of which way is up. I realise that there is instrumentation to give the orientation of the horizon, but it is amazing how convincing your mind can get sometimes.

Please note, I am not a pilot, nor have I even been up front in a flying aircraft, I am basing this on being in a whiteout on a mountain. Without a fixed visual reference it is easy to loose sense of the vertical to the point where I have descended 50m down a slope before realising it (we were supposed to be on a level ridge). I have also stumbled over a small rock which I thought was a large boulder a lot further away. It might sound stupid to you, but it happens all too often.


Also the Pitot tubes (not capitalised, they are named after Henri Pitot) are sometimes used to give an altitude reading as well as air speed (Pitot Static systems). If they were iced up this could have caused problems with the altitude indicator as well as the air speed indicator.

As for it all being the fault of Airbus, they only make the plane. There are lots of things that could have caused failure, from poor maintenance to freak occurrences. A couple of examples are the AeroPeru flight 603, where tape was left over some of the Pitot ports by a cleaner, or the Birgenair flight 301, where it was suspected that insects had made a nest which blocked the Pitot tubes.
You can't pull out of a stall that you can feel, if the stall made it to the excent that your Vertical Speed is -1700 Or more, even if you can feel it, there is no stopping it!
post #48 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerJohn View Post
I would imagine that in a storm you are robbed of any fixed point of reference, so that would make it hard to feel which way the plane was actually going. Also it can mess with your perception of which way is up. I realise that there is instrumentation to give the orientation of the horizon, but it is amazing how convincing your mind can get sometimes.

Please note, I am not a pilot, nor have I even been up front in a flying aircraft, I am basing this on being in a whiteout on a mountain. Without a fixed visual reference it is easy to loose sense of the vertical to the point where I have descended 50m down a slope before realising it (we were supposed to be on a level ridge). I have also stumbled over a small rock which I thought was a large boulder a lot further away. It might sound stupid to you, but it happens all too often.


Also the Pitot tubes (not capitalised, they are named after Henri Pitot) are sometimes used to give an altitude reading as well as air speed (Pitot Static systems). If they were iced up this could have caused problems with the altitude indicator as well as the air speed indicator.

As for it all being the fault of Airbus, they only make the plane. There are lots of things that could have caused failure, from poor maintenance to freak occurrences. A couple of examples are the AeroPeru flight 603, where tape was left over some of the Pitot ports by a cleaner, or the Birgenair flight 301, where it was suspected that insects had made a nest which blocked the Pitot tubes.
You can't pull out of a stall that you can feel, if the stall made it to the extent that your Vertical Speed is -1700 Or more, even if you can feel it, there is no stopping it!
post #49 of 49
There is only one answer for this... aliens.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4770k Asus Maximus VI Hero Powercolor R9 290 Reference 12GB G-Skill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 840 EVO 256gb, 640gb WD Black, 500GB WD... Corsair H100i Windows 8.1 x64 Qnix QX2710 Evo II 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Chicony 5181 Seasonic X750 Fractal Design Arc MiDi Mionix NAOS 3200 
Mouse PadAudio
XTRAC Pads Ripper XXL HiFimeDIY Sabre DAC -> Parasound Zamp v3 -> Gra... 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 4770k Asus Maximus VI Hero Powercolor R9 290 Reference 12GB G-Skill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 840 EVO 256gb, 640gb WD Black, 500GB WD... Corsair H100i Windows 8.1 x64 Qnix QX2710 Evo II 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Chicony 5181 Seasonic X750 Fractal Design Arc MiDi Mionix NAOS 3200 
Mouse PadAudio
XTRAC Pads Ripper XXL HiFimeDIY Sabre DAC -> Parasound Zamp v3 -> Gra... 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Technology and Science News
Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Technology and Science News › [Skyline NewsRoom] Air France 447 Memory Unit Found