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post #11 of 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KhaoticKomputing View Post
Doo eet yourself!/subbed, I wanna know how it turns out love watching first time modders have a go at it
This really isnt the first time I've modded a case. just the first time it mattered cosmetically. This is the first mod I ever did to a PC case, not much of a mod. It was on my Aspire Dreamer II case. I actually cut out the mesh wiring with wire cutters then use a grinder stone to smooth it out. took forever.....



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post #12 of 30
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Oh and I bought the wring size hole saw . Bought the 4 inch instead of 4 1/2 inch.
post #13 of 30
lol, not bad! even if you know what your doing, doo eet! its fun
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post #14 of 30
Several tips I can provide are the following:
- When drilling or using a hole saw on acrylic, always clamp the panel to a wooden backing.
- When you buy an acrylic sheet with a protective cling-cover, leave that on for as much of the processing as you can; this helps keep it from being scratched
- If you have a panel without the protective film, use painters tape; the glue on masking tape will leave a residue
- use only glass or acrylic polish/cleaners; stuff like goo-gone will often dull the finish
- Use water as a lube/coolant for cutting/drilling acrylic; this will result in a better surface in the cut, I prefer not to use cutting oil/grease as this may dull the acrylic




I have found that when you use a hole saw on acrylic without any lube, when the saw goes through into the wood it'll occlude sawdust into the acrylic on the cut surface. When using water, you have to regularly stop add water and clean the plastic shavings off the teeth of the blade (the plastic actually melts and then solidifies between the teeth); this takes longer to cut the hole but leaves a pretty smooth surface and does not draw any wood dust into the acrylic.

For smaller holes in the acrylic, drilling dry leaves a dull translucent surface; while drilling wet with water leaves a transparent semi-polished surface, which is great if you can't git in the hole to polish it up.
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post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by radodrill View Post
Several tips I can provide are the following:
- When drilling or using a hole saw on acrylic, always clamp the panel to a wooden backing.
- When you buy an acrylic sheet with a protective cling-cover, leave that on for as much of the processing as you can; this helps keep it from being scratched
- If you have a panel without the protective film, use painters tape; the glue on masking tape will leave a residue
- use only glass or acrylic polish/cleaners; stuff like goo-gone will often dull the finish
- Use water as a lube/coolant for cutting/drilling acrylic; this will result in a better surface in the cut, I prefer not to use cutting oil/grease as this may dull the acrylic




I have found that when you use a hole saw on acrylic without any lube, when the saw goes through into the wood it'll occlude sawdust into the acrylic on the cut surface. When using water, you have to regularly stop add water and clean the plastic shavings off the teeth of the blade (the plastic actually melts and then solidifies between the teeth); this takes longer to cut the hole but leaves a pretty smooth surface and does not draw any wood dust into the acrylic.

For smaller holes in the acrylic, drilling dry leaves a dull translucent surface; while drilling wet with water leaves a transparent semi-polished surface, which is great if you can't git in the hole to polish it up.
Great info on how to work with acrylic! I would +rep you but yea....
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Gizmoto
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post #16 of 30
fine teeth and high speed = heat = BAD IDEA on Acrylic sheets. The acrylic will melt and jam the blade.
I would use larger teeth thats use for wood. medium speed. dont alot the blade to get too hot. or you can start with 1-2" hole and use very corse sand drum to sand to the desire size.
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post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by czynot View Post
fine teeth and high speed = heat = BAD IDEA on Acrylic sheets. The acrylic will melt and jam the blade.
I would use larger teeth thats use for wood. medium speed. dont alot the blade to get too hot. or you can start with 1-2" hole and use very corse sand drum to sand to the desire size.
I've found that on acrylics high tooth counts are vital in that they produce a smoother cut and are much less likely to chip the acrylic. When I didn't have my table saw, I was cutting with a jigsaw and high tooth count metal blades worked very well while aggressive wood blades would chip it like crazy; I also see with the table saw that the fine cut blades (high tooth count) produce much better results than a framing blade. The reason for this is that with the higher tooth count each tooth is actually taking a much smaller bite out of the acrylic thus less chance of doing damage.
On a side note, when cutting acrylics, the only times I've had issues with the bits/blades getting gummed up is when using engraving bits on the Dremel and when using water with a hole-saw (which I stated before and actually provides a better finish in the hole).

Also, I do not like using the Dremel sanding drums on acrylic; especially not the coarse ones. The reason is that invariably the grit from the sandpaper gets occluded into the acrylic. A better choice is to use a good router or a spiral bit on the Dremel.
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RAD GT
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post #18 of 30
Actually, you can use a low TPI blade...



...if you want to completely destroy the workpiece and buy a new sheet.
Edited by SmasherBasher - 5/3/11 at 7:18pm
post #19 of 30
Thread Starter 
Tomorrow I'm starting Operation: Breathe New Life. Before I cut into my current case, I'm going to try to revive my old Aspire X-Dreamer II.

This is the original inside of the case.

I already pulled the HDD rack out, since I only will be using 1 or 2 max HDDs I can just put them in the 5.25 drive bays.

Here's the game plan, Gonna try to throw a few 120mm fans in it. Those 80MM fans are gonna be taken out and a metal sheet covering the holes.

This is the part where I'm on the fence. Under that 92mm fan is a already cut 80mm fan. With a 120mm fan on the other side, I'm not sure it if would be a good idea, I might just put a Mesh filter over it and forget about it.

Finally, going to cut out that awful mesh grill and just put a fan grill.


Hopefully it will go smooth with all the information which you all have helped me with.
post #20 of 30
Thread Starter 
All in all it was a pretty good experience. Learned for a few hickups that popped up along the way. Cracked the acrylic side but it doesn't look to bad. Probably should have started the screw holes small then worked the way up. Got a few fans and grills on the way to add and a 80mm mesh fan grill to cover that hole and I'm done.






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