Overclock.net › Forums › AMD › AMD CPUs › Overclocking HP Pavilion P6710f with new 1065T cpu
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Overclocking HP Pavilion P6710f with new 1065T cpu - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemesis158;13467911 
AMD overdrive is for dedicated graphics cards and is integrated with the Catalyst Controls.

no. amd overdrive is for amd products. that includes processors and both onboard and add-in video cards. but overdrive isnt worth crap.
w00t
(18 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
ph2 x20be asus m4a785-m sapphire vapor-x 4850  geil black dragon 1066 5-5-5-15-20 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
wd  asus dvd multi-write arctic cooling freezer 64 pro win 7 ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung 42" lcd logitech wireless antec basic 500watt old dell crap 
MouseAudio
logitech wireless pioneer 7.1 
  hide details  
Reply
w00t
(18 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
ph2 x20be asus m4a785-m sapphire vapor-x 4850  geil black dragon 1066 5-5-5-15-20 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
wd  asus dvd multi-write arctic cooling freezer 64 pro win 7 ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung 42" lcd logitech wireless antec basic 500watt old dell crap 
MouseAudio
logitech wireless pioneer 7.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 16
alright let me go over some basic notes that you gotta know when buying a new computer desktop.

Prebuilt desktops:

Examples are the ones you can pick up at Future Shop, Best Buy or Staples.
Some Good names: Asus, MSI, HP, Acer

Advantages of a prebuilt PC:

-Full System Warrenty support in 1 package
-Quick and easy in case you dont have the time to build one
-Peace of mind, that it is all built with quality

Disadvantages of a prebuilt PC:

-Usually Cheap parts for core components that novice users never look at like Motherboard PSU and RAM
-As soon as warranty is gone, you cannot RMA any parts as they are all OEM
-No overclocking or tweaking options available
-Usually a basic OS installed with bloat ware on it from the manufacture.
-Usually the cable management is horrible

Personally Custom Built PC:

You buy all the parts, from the motherboard, the CPU the HDD and you have control over what parts to buy and what part of your computer will work the hardest and pick the appropriate parts.

Examples: Asus P7P55D-E motherboard, Gigabyte G1 Assassin Motherboard, Corsair P128 SSD, or other single computer parts

Advantages of Custom Built PCs:

-You have control of what parts you put in
-You have control over the operating system, and what operating system you use
-No bloat ware, you configure the OS
-If done properly, the system will be well balanced, and cables should be nice and clean.
-You have multiple warranty plans on EACH individual part, from 1 year to lifetime
-You have COMPLETE control of your computer, you can tweak chips past factory settings, flash you BIOS to the latest version, and mod 1 part, without breaking the warranty of the whole system.

-You can upgrade parts and swap out anything anytime, and still be covered under the original warranty of the other parts, and getting a new warranty on the new part you just bought.

-Flexible, things like Water cooling, and case mods can be done while building and shopping, and a lot more though goes into these machines than OEM ones.
-some warranties support modding and tweaking

-Peace of mind, when you build the exact system spec you want, and quality that is a result of your own hard work.
Disadvantage of a Custom Built PC.

-Its a tad time consuming to put together, make sure u have an hour or 2 at hand, depending on the rig complexity.
-You have to set up any RAID arrays and install the OS which may be daunting for a novice user
-there is a LOT of packaging and spare parts you will have at the end.
-you could potentially end up with a bad part, or a poorly built system, or even in the worst of cases, buy incompatible parts, which are all user mistakes and are the result of a novice user that doesn't do research.

___________________________
in conclusion, if all you are doing is browsing the internet, or watching movies on your PC, and do not plan on tweaking a prebuilt is good for you, but i think i speak for all members of OCN here when i say, when you want a desktop PC, Do it right and build it yourself, you learn a lot along the way, and you know what you buy. Custom Machines are much more flexible and in general much more powerful than OEM computers, as the manufactures tend to put emphasis on a few specific parts and cheap on all the other parts to give the illusion of good prices. In this world, what you pay is what you get. So spend the extra buck on premium parts, and you are guaranteed Premium performance if you bought the right things with your money.

My only exception to prebuilt machines is machines from NCIX or IBUYPOWER, because they are basically custom built machines that are assembled elsewhere for you, and then you buy them.

REMEMBER LAPTOPS DO NOT COUNT TO THIS POST, ONLY DESKTOP PCs.

________________
basically, what im telling you is, before you buy anything, weather it be a computer, or a car, or even a toaster, do your research, and find out what you are getting for what you pay. there was no sense in buying the HP pavilion if you wanted to overclock it, and you could have found of with 5 minutes of google.
Edited by Pentium4 531 overclocker - 5/11/11 at 3:45pm
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3960X Extreme Edition Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3 MSI GTX 980 Gaming 4G HyperX Fury Red - 16GB DDR3 1866MHz 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
AMD Performance OEM - 16GB DDR3 1866MHz Sandisk Ultra II 500GB SSD Samsung 830 128GB SSD WD Caviar Black 500GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD Caviar Green 1TB MSI DVD Burner Corsair H100i Windows 10 Education 64Bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Asus VE247H AZIO MGK L80 Mechanical Keyboard Corsair HX1050 NZXT Phantom 210 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
CM Sentinel Advance DXRacer Zero Series - White Shark Creative Sound Blaster Z Sennheiser HD 598Cs 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3960X Extreme Edition Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3 MSI GTX 980 Gaming 4G HyperX Fury Red - 16GB DDR3 1866MHz 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
AMD Performance OEM - 16GB DDR3 1866MHz Sandisk Ultra II 500GB SSD Samsung 830 128GB SSD WD Caviar Black 500GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD Caviar Green 1TB MSI DVD Burner Corsair H100i Windows 10 Education 64Bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Asus VE247H AZIO MGK L80 Mechanical Keyboard Corsair HX1050 NZXT Phantom 210 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
CM Sentinel Advance DXRacer Zero Series - White Shark Creative Sound Blaster Z Sennheiser HD 598Cs 
  hide details  
Reply
post #13 of 16
^^ +1 for not treating him like a dip***** and explaining it to him
w00t
(18 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
ph2 x20be asus m4a785-m sapphire vapor-x 4850  geil black dragon 1066 5-5-5-15-20 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
wd  asus dvd multi-write arctic cooling freezer 64 pro win 7 ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung 42" lcd logitech wireless antec basic 500watt old dell crap 
MouseAudio
logitech wireless pioneer 7.1 
  hide details  
Reply
w00t
(18 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
ph2 x20be asus m4a785-m sapphire vapor-x 4850  geil black dragon 1066 5-5-5-15-20 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
wd  asus dvd multi-write arctic cooling freezer 64 pro win 7 ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung 42" lcd logitech wireless antec basic 500watt old dell crap 
MouseAudio
logitech wireless pioneer 7.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Total-Newb View Post
The part about having half a brain is totally uncalled for. yes; I saw a thread about HP pavilion not being able to handle overclocking but it was from 2007. I also saw cpu-z and amd tool on the net so I thought I may be able to pull it off.

Being polite goes a long way you know...

Thanks to all that contributed and helped without insulting.
sorry about that. I wasn't intentionally trying to insult you, the question you asked confused me...

It isn't necessarily that the components themselves cannot handle any overclocking potential (though undoubtedly more limited by design shortcuts and cheaper parts), its that the OEMs use custom versions (slight design/hardware changes, or just a different BIOS+IC) of other motherboards on the market and program them in such a way as to not allow overclocking (the options simply aren't there. even if you could use a BIOS editing program, overclocking features usually are not simply hidden to be fixed this way, but rather weren't programmed in to begin with).

If they allowed overclocking they would be spending much more on warranties than they do on anything else, or denying much more warranties and then losing business to bad rep. the other thing is, if everyone could overclock, the company would lose business because everyone would buy the lower end model..... (in other words, its all about the control of $$$ and they don't want to lose any of it)

Imagined if a kid managed to get into the bios of the new computer his parents just bought him and typed random numbers in every box he could find, and ends up frying it? The parents are going to take it back, but the manufacturer is either going to deny the warranty because it was overclocked, (recipe for angry people right there.......) or cut into their bottom line replacing it and countless other "accidents".

again, I'm sorry that came out the way it did, it was a little bit of a head-scratcher for me. Companies like DELL, HP ect. usually don't change something like this unless it becomes a non-risk to their business, and I wouldn't expect that to happen until intel/amd comes up with a processor/other components that can be overclocked to near infinity (5nm 3-Dimensional Quantum sphere processors anyone?)
post #15 of 16
I have a P6710F at home. I've since changed out the motherboard for an asus matx factor (that's what it uses) changed out the case with a Sentey Black Box edition, changed out the PSU with some little cheapo 500w that microcenter had on sell, and thrown a 4870 into the mix as well, and I can honestly tell you a few things.

1. Buying a new motherboard, and NOT a new case is NOT an option.
The power button on the front of the computer case uses a specifically designed connector for THAT motherboard. Luckily, they didn't pull a dell, and have dedicated mounting systems that are in THAT case only. But you're going to have to replace at LEAST the case.

2. Buying just a new case is a pain in the ass for the same reason as above.
Reasons behind saying that: The HP motherboard is not labelled as to which pins are for the power cable, reset button (non existant in the case it comes in) hdd light, or power light. I had to figure all of them out by tracing which cords let to what on the connector from the power button.

3. Adding a new graphics card in was a cinch. they're pci express 2.0 but as well all know a 2.1 will work in a 2.0, it'll just be slowed down a hair, which is fine for me.

4. The pwoer supply (depending on the case you have it in) could be a probelm. Honestly, shop around at a few computer stores, and bring the case and motherboard (mounted) with you, and ask if you can open certain ones to find one that will reach the power connection. OR just buy a 4 pin power connection extension.

5. The HP motherboard gives you a "Possible error prevention" message when the system fan port doesn't have a fan connected to it. Annoying as hell, but doesn't keep the system from booting (you just have to manually push F2 to go past that screen on startup.)
EVERY part on this computer is upgradable. Even the little PCI Express slot that the wifi card rests in. You can buy an adapter, and slide that bad boy in there, and make a mounting bracket for it, and have a whole other slot created for your convience.

6. Be VERY careful with that Wi-Fi "antenna" the solder on it breaks easy as hell, and even with years of soldering, it's impossible for me to fix without having to re-strip the cord a tad, and create a new clean solder area. So unless you know how to solder VERY well, don't bother messing with that antenna to much. Be careful.

7. The media card reader is NOT the standard size of a 31/2drive enclosure, so make sure you check it out before you go thinking that it'll fit. I had to bend a piece of metal on the side back in (a pain since it's only about 1/4" out of the side) and then make a mounting bracket by hand for it from some steel I had laying around.

8. There are only TWO 3 pin fan connections on this motherboard, and neither really powers the fans good enough for you to want them on there, since they're PWM, however, the CPU fan is NECESSARY for bootup and the system chassis fan is an optional, with removal prompt. So make sure that you get plenty of four pin molex fans to go in your new case.

I think that is it for now. If I think of more later, I'll let you know.
The Dracconian
(30 items)
 
The Sh1tt3r
(0 items)
Modaddom
(0 items)
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
Phenom II x6 1100t Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 DualX HD7950 HIS HD 6850 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
PNY 64C0MHHHJ-HS Western Digital Green Seagate Barracuda Western Digital Blue 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOptical DriveCooling
Toshiba USB 3.0 Drive Sony DVD-RW Sony BD-Rom 3x Rosewill 230mm 79CFM Fans 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
3x 120mm Rosewill 79CFM fans 1x 140mm Rosewill 90CFM Fan Cooler Master 240m with 2x120mm Cooler Master f... 1x 90mm Fan pci bracket mounted to cool Northbr... 
CoolingOSOSOS
1x 25mm Fan mounted to cool VRM (upgrading later) Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 Linux Mac OSX 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Acer 23" 1080 60Hz 1x HP w2338h 1080 60Hz Acer 23" 1080 60Hz Logitech Illuminated Keyboard 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Cougar 760w Non-Modular Power Supply 80Bronze C... Rosewill Thor V2 Logitech G600 Black & White Klipsch iFi 250watt Speakers 
AudioAudio
GigaWare 16Watt 2.1 Surround Sound with Modifie... Turtle Beach Earforce P11 
  hide details  
Reply
The Dracconian
(30 items)
 
The Sh1tt3r
(0 items)
Modaddom
(0 items)
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
Phenom II x6 1100t Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 DualX HD7950 HIS HD 6850 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
PNY 64C0MHHHJ-HS Western Digital Green Seagate Barracuda Western Digital Blue 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOptical DriveCooling
Toshiba USB 3.0 Drive Sony DVD-RW Sony BD-Rom 3x Rosewill 230mm 79CFM Fans 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
3x 120mm Rosewill 79CFM fans 1x 140mm Rosewill 90CFM Fan Cooler Master 240m with 2x120mm Cooler Master f... 1x 90mm Fan pci bracket mounted to cool Northbr... 
CoolingOSOSOS
1x 25mm Fan mounted to cool VRM (upgrading later) Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 Linux Mac OSX 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Acer 23" 1080 60Hz 1x HP w2338h 1080 60Hz Acer 23" 1080 60Hz Logitech Illuminated Keyboard 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Cougar 760w Non-Modular Power Supply 80Bronze C... Rosewill Thor V2 Logitech G600 Black & White Klipsch iFi 250watt Speakers 
AudioAudio
GigaWare 16Watt 2.1 Surround Sound with Modifie... Turtle Beach Earforce P11 
  hide details  
Reply
post #16 of 16
Yeah unfortunately buying a prebuilt computer like HP is really going to make your journey towards optimal performance and any overclocking an extremely uphill and one sided battle.

Basically these computers did not have overclocking in mind. They do not have custimization in mind. They are built for the cookie cutter consumers. The average people who's idea of a good gaming computer is Farmville. These computers are meant to last a few years, become outdated technologically, and then die and then they expect you to buy again from them again because you don't know any better.

Simply put, most people don't even know what overclocking is. They don't know the benefits that a custom PC can offer. But the thing is... most people don't need anything more then prebuilt.

What are your computer needs? Are you gaming at max settings? Are you trying to do insane amounts of Video Editing or extremely cpu intensive tasks?

I made the mistake of buying a prebuilt HP computer before my current system. And I immediately regretted it as soon as I wanted to put in a Nvidia 8800 GT and realized it would never fit. I had to settle for a Nvidia 7900 gs which to be honest was a strong card for the time, and can still run most new games at least on low specs. The system last me a good 4 years about and it was actually fine for my gaming needs although it was a little sad seeing new game titles making me set my graphics settings lower and lower each year.

But at this point your kind of screwed if you want to overclock and customize your set up. My advice to you would be if you can get a full refund do it now. Unless your computer needs aren't that extreme. Then perhaps your current system would be just fine for you, even without modifications.

There should really be more public knowledge of computers. Even many gamers who would consider themselves at least semi-hardcore buy prebuilt computers, and they have no idea what they are missing out on if they went custom.
My computer
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-2600k ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3 EVGA Geforce GTX 560 ti G.skill 2x4GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
1x 500gb 7200 rpm 1x 250gb 7200 rpm Windows Ultimate 64 bit 23'' LG Flatron W2353V Corsair 650 Watt 80 plus certified 
Case
Cooler Master HAF 912 
  hide details  
Reply
My computer
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-2600k ASUS P8Z68-V/GEN3 EVGA Geforce GTX 560 ti G.skill 2x4GB DDR3 1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
1x 500gb 7200 rpm 1x 250gb 7200 rpm Windows Ultimate 64 bit 23'' LG Flatron W2353V Corsair 650 Watt 80 plus certified 
Case
Cooler Master HAF 912 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: AMD CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › AMD › AMD CPUs › Overclocking HP Pavilion P6710f with new 1065T cpu