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How to accurately calculate power draw and choose a fitting power supply - Page 2

post #11 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by linkin93 View Post
It can if it's a quality one Engines and power supplies are different beats, but you make a valid point. I'm really just trying to get people away from seeing "550W psu recommended" and taking it as needing 550W for the single component, when it's for the entire system. It still happens too often.
Yes, I fully agree!
    
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post #12 of 50
Your pc will sometimes draw 20 percent then 30 percent sometimes 70 percent sometimes 10 percent etc etc
post #13 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooony View Post
Your pc will sometimes draw 20 percent then 30 percent sometimes 70 percent sometimes 10 percent etc etc
Yep. You can easily calculate how much based on your hardware though

More comments welcome!
post #14 of 50
Interesting.

But another thing to note is that A LOT of reviews tend to mention the power consumption being at 100% all of the time. So even in "real world" usage I can't honestly say we'll be running "fur mark" for hours at time or any applications that will take advantage of both at full capacity.
post #15 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarvinDessica View Post
Interesting.

But another thing to note is that A LOT of reviews tend to mention the power consumption being at 100% all of the time. So even in "real world" usage I can't honestly say we'll be running "fur mark" for hours at time or any applications that will take advantage of both at full capacity.
You don't test 100% load with furmark, you need to do that with a power supply tester. Both that and furmark/cpu stress test will never amount to real world usage, however it will be close (folding excluded)
post #16 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by linkin93 View Post
You don't test 100% load with furmark, you need to do that with a power supply tester. Both that and furmark/cpu stress test will never amount to real world usage, however it will be close (folding excluded)
That's true. I know I really won't be using 100% of my rig, even in Crysis neither my video card or otherwise really go anywhere close to 50%

"Real World" usage for me is-

Playing the occasional game, facebook, youtube and listening to music/watching a blu-ray or netflix.
post #17 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarvinDessica View Post
That's true. I know I really won't be using 100% of my rig, even in Crysis neither my video card or otherwise really go anywhere close to 50%

"Real World" usage for me is-

Playing the occasional game, facebook, youtube and listening to music/watching a blu-ray or netflix.
So your most common usage is "idle" - you would choose a power supply that can run your hardware and overclocks with a little headroom to maintain efficiency, and also be efficient at idle. Good thing 80plus covers that the majority of the time. Of course you have exceptions like absolute 100% load and maybe only running fans off the PSU.
post #18 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by linkin93 View Post
So your most common usage is "idle" - you would choose a power supply that can run your hardware and overclocks with a little headroom to maintain efficiency, and also be efficient at idle. Good thing 80plus covers that the majority of the time. Of course you have exceptions like absolute 100% load and maybe only running fans off the PSU.
Lol yeah pretty much. I play for a few hours when I get the chance (Especially this weekend, I LOVE the first Witcher so far.) I'm definitely not going to be running folding or anything like that for the time being. And I may exchange this video card, this thing uses more energy than I'm comfortable with.
post #19 of 50
The major problem is the gap in power usage between idle and load is way too wide, which is what makes this article obsolete (even though I share your point of view exactly). 80plus is currently the only standard and regardless if the PSU is Gold or Bronze rated, even a 400W will not be efficient most of the time powering an idle system since an 80+ PSUs efficiency only begins at 20% PSU power draw. If you're using a 400W PSU, that means it needs 100W of power to be used by the system for the power supply to work efficiently, and for example, if my CPU/GPU in my sig rig are idling, they'll use about 60W at most, whereas if I overclock and run everything at load, over time even the 400W won't cut it for long. Until 80plus change their standard to make their PSUs run at a constant efficiency regardless of the load (or make it as efficient at 10% load at least) the principle of buying lower wattage PSUs for better efficiency is still a flawed argument in my opinion, since most people's PCs are idle for the vast majority of the time and the PSUs will not be efficient unless you specifically use high-power drawing components with through-the-roof power usage at idle (GTX 480 for example). Then again not forgetting that since higher wattage quality PSUs usually have more overkill components, there's the question of capacitor aging, which is where the higher-wattage PSU could win out in the long run?
Edited by Am* - 5/30/11 at 6:54am
    
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post #20 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Am* View Post
The major problem is the gap in power usage between idle and load is way too wide, which is what makes this article obsolete (even though I share your point of view exactly). 80plus is currently the only standard and regardless if the PSU is Gold or Bronze rated, even a 400W will not be efficient most of the time powering an idle system since an 80+ PSUs efficiency only begins at 20% PSU power draw. If you're using a 400W PSU, that means it needs 100W of power to be used by the system for the power supply to work efficiently, and for example, if my CPU/GPU in my sig rig are idling, they'll use about 60W at most, whereas if I overclock and run everything at load, over time even the 400W won't cut it for long. Until 80plus change their standard to make their PSUs run at a constant efficiency regardless of the load (or make it as efficient at 10% load at least) the principle of buying lower wattage PSUs for better efficiency is still a flawed argument in my opinion, since most people's PCs are idle for the vast majority of the time and the PSUs will not be efficient unless you specifically use high-power drawing components with through-the-roof power usage at idle (GTX 480 for example). Then again not forgetting that since higher wattage quality PSUs usually have more overkill components, there's the question of capacitor aging, which is where the higher-wattage PSU could win out in the long run?
Of course, you shouldn't buy a powersupply based on efficiency. Any good power supply will have decent efficiency. But it is something to consider as part of the broader picture. You should always choose a PSU based on your current and future needs.
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