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[CNN] Why would-be engineers end up as English majors - Page 7

post #61 of 341
the del sign is now a standard math operator, as much as +, -, *, /, integral, derivative, double integral, square root, power, ln, sigma, triple integral, dot, cross, double derivative, triple derivative, line integral, surface integral..... if you do not know what the del sign means, get out of my class.
Edited by dontpwnmebro - 5/22/11 at 3:37am
post #62 of 341
what? you don't know how to do this 4 page problem 90% of the general public doesn't know how to do? you must be an idiot.
post #63 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchmoSalt View Post
These higher level courses are very tough courses and should not be taken lightly. We need confident teachers teaching these courses or we will continue to see our science graduate base decrease.
This. I dropped out of Comp Eng over ten years ago because the teachers had no clue about teaching. They either seemed more interested in their own projects, or they just plain couldn't teach.

Although, to be fair, its really difficult to teach high level topics no matter how well you know the material. How many of us can do things on our computers, and know exactly what we are doing, but would be unable to explain it to a non-techy?
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post #64 of 341
Most professors at the university level in science courses are really bad teachers. If you do decide on an engineering/science field, make sure you are good at independent learning. Make sure your fundamental math skills are really good (algebra, geometry, and trig). Science fields tend to be a lot more competitive than most art fields (especially grading-wise).

One of the biggest problems is students are not taught the fundamentals well enough from elementary school through high school. Then when university level math/science courses begin, it is too overwhelming.

Math and sciences are topics where you just have to drill over and over to master it. One of the problems I had was I always got 95 percent in math and science courses during high school. Nothing higher. Then when college began, that 5 percent I missed always came back to haunt me.

Well I still survived CE but I miss my friends.
Edited by Riou - 5/22/11 at 6:39am
post #65 of 341
less sentry guns are better anyways.
post #66 of 341
I saw this on my University page on Facebook yesterday and I agree with everything it said. The problem seems to be the teaching/teachers. Here in Texas, our legislatures are cutting education spending again. Since about 2003, our tuition has increased by 500%. It makes little sense to me because we have something called a rainy-day fund for, you know, economic hardships. What I don't understand is why law makers won't tap this fund for education since it's worth $8bln.
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post #67 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post
Math and sciences are topics where you just have to drill over and over to master it. One of the problems I had was I always got 95 percent in math and science courses during high school. Nothing higher. Then when college began, that 5 percent I missed always came back to haunt me.
I know what you mean. My college didn't accept the AP Calculus exam, they had their own. When I took it there was stuff on it that I was like, "Hey, we were never even taught this." I showed some of it to my Calc teacher, and she was like, "Sure we did." and proceeded to show me where in the book we did it. Yeah, we spent about 15 minutes out of the school year on these topics, but it was involved in like 10-15% of the test.
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post #68 of 341
I am just about to graduate, and I can say that those who blame the teachers at University, are the ones who fail. Why? Because University is not about being spoon fed like at school. It's about solidifying a positive attitude towards your studies and finding internal motivation to graduate. In life, you must stand on your own feet. The days of being spoon fed are over. Take some responsibility for your own learning.
    
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post #69 of 341
I would think that the premise of the article is answered in the text. I don't think that either of my degrees are in the "STEM" field, but they are math-ish, and the classes all whittled themselves down to about 25-30 percent before the drop date. It's supposed to be like that. I do not want a structural engineer designing something my life will depend on, that needed to be hand-held through the education process, because the real world isn't going to offer much hand holding. Same with the person managing my finances or the doc that is playing with knives on peoples insides.

People switch to amorphous liberal arts programs, because grading is subjective not empirical. 2+2= whatever you want it to in 19th Century Black Lit, not so much Advanced Organic Chem.
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post #70 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by alk View Post
I am just about to graduate, and I can say that those who blame the teachers at University, are the ones who fail. Why? Because University is not about being spoon fed like at school. It's about solidifying a positive attitude towards your studies and finding internal motivation to graduate. In life, you must stand on your own feet. The days of being spoon fed are over. Take some responsibility for your own learning.
You're not in the US. You don't know what our schools are like. Trust me, it's worse here.
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