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What is binning?

post #1 of 7
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Explain?
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post #2 of 7
Binning means basically choosing the best GPU / CPU out of the lot in terms of OCing and packaging it (Golden Edition, Talon Hawk, etc) and selling it as an awesome overclocker.

I couldn't think of a more simple way to explain it, hope it wasn't confusing.
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post #3 of 7
Also buying multiple cpus or gpus to test yourself to pick out the best overclocker.
    
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post #4 of 7
It's something like this. Suppose you have a CPU design, for the sake of the argument the latest SandyBridge from Intel. On the silicon wafer after the lithography process you'll have an X number of dies which get assembled in CPUs. All these CPUs are tested and some for example are binned for high clock speed and are marked as K-series, while others have lower headroom and are marked as i3 or Pentium - this is binning. Others call binning another procedure (dunno if it's correct to call that binning or not) but here it is: sometimes supposedly one has very high demand of low-end chips like the aforementioned i3. Intel may be able to tag a certain CPU as a 2600K, but since the demand for i3 is very high it will in stead tag is as an i3 and sell it for cheaper although the CPU is capable of far higher speeds. Another example would be AMD's processors, when OCed they all seem to be able to reach 3.7-3.8GHz, maybe more; despite that some are sold at 2.8GHz as AMD can't sell only Phenom x4 980 so they bin those dies for some lower market segments.
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post #5 of 7
When a chip is made, it has a theoretical maximum speed. However, flaws in the manufacturing process mean that not every chip will run at the maximum (if any). Hence, chips are 'binned' or grouped according to their performance taking into account how they actually run. For example, the Phenom II series of chips are (assuming the same core or series) essentially the same. Some have higher speeds; others have more cores enabled. But in the end, they are exactly the same chips.

Chips also have a safe voltage for stock coolers to keep them under a certain temperature. Here at OCN, we like to throw on a better heatsink and then up the voltage. Higher voltage can often overcome some of the manufacturing flaws and in turn gives us higher overclocks or unlocked cores. This is why buying a slower chip and then overclocking it has such appeal.
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post #6 of 7
The manufacture can "bin" or a private person can in effect bin. When you pay high dollar for a chip with proven desirable overclock capabilities you have in effect bought a binned chip.Think of it as a way to make a few bucks, buy cpus and work up a performance data sheet that proves what they can do, then sell them at a preminum.Haven't you seen a cpu in the marketplace that is going for 75.00 or so above what is normal? it is because the owner can prove how it performs.
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_thaddeus View Post
Binning means basically choosing the best GPU / CPU out of the lot in terms of OCing and packaging it (Golden Edition, Talon Hawk, etc) and selling it as an awesome overclocker.

I couldn't think of a more simple way to explain it, hope it wasn't confusing.
this

Quote:
Originally Posted by FtW 420 View Post
Also buying multiple cpus or gpus to test yourself to pick out the best overclocker.
that

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragosmp View Post
It's something like this. Suppose you have a CPU design, for the sake of the argument the latest SandyBridge from Intel. On the silicon wafer after the lithography process you'll have an X number of dies which get assembled in CPUs. All these CPUs are tested and some for example are binned for high clock speed and are marked as K-series, while others have lower headroom and are marked as i3 or Pentium - this is binning. Others call binning another procedure (dunno if it's correct to call that binning or not) but here it is: sometimes supposedly one has very high demand of low-end chips like the aforementioned i3. Intel may be able to tag a certain CPU as a 2600K, but since the demand for i3 is very high it will in stead tag is as an i3 and sell it for cheaper although the CPU is capable of far higher speeds. Another example would be AMD's processors, when OCed they all seem to be able to reach 3.7-3.8GHz, maybe more; despite that some are sold at 2.8GHz as AMD can't sell only Phenom x4 980 so they bin those dies for some lower market segments.
as well as this

Quote:
Originally Posted by IEATFISH View Post
When a chip is made, it has a theoretical maximum speed. However, flaws in the manufacturing process mean that not every chip will run at the maximum (if any). Hence, chips are 'binned' or grouped according to their performance taking into account how they actually run. For example, the Phenom II series of chips are (assuming the same core or series) essentially the same. Some have higher speeds; others have more cores enabled. But in the end, they are exactly the same chips.

Chips also have a safe voltage for stock coolers to keep them under a certain temperature. Here at OCN, we like to throw on a better heatsink and then up the voltage. Higher voltage can often overcome some of the manufacturing flaws and in turn gives us higher overclocks or unlocked cores. This is why buying a slower chip and then overclocking it has such appeal.
and that

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCCstudent View Post
The manufacture can "bin" or a private person can in effect bin. When you pay high dollar for a chip with proven desirable overclock capabilities you have in effect bought a binned chip.Think of it as a way to make a few bucks, buy cpus and work up a performance data sheet that proves what they can do, then sell them at a preminum.Haven't you seen a cpu in the marketplace that is going for 75.00 or so above what is normal? it is because the owner can prove how it performs.
mmm hmmm
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