Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › [Build Log] Quiet, Minimalist Custom Wood Gaming PC
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Build Log] Quiet, Minimalist Custom Wood Gaming PC - Page 4

post #31 of 120
I once built a SFF case out of 1/2-inch cherry. I attached the wooden outer shell to the aluminum frame via shortened #8 threaded inserts. I also had to use a ground down brad point bit so it wouldn't poke through.

CherrySFF3.jpg

CherrySFF6.jpg

Keep up the good work!
post #32 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by davecasa;13726210 
This is going to live next to my desk for the rest of its life, not a LAN party machine biggrin.gif Even without the sides on, this thing is really strong, much stronger than I thought it would be... I'm pretty sure I could sit on it. One thing I am considering because of your comments is screwing the panels to the frame in addition to glueing, from the inside so the screws are hidden. But with the panels only 1/2 inch thick, I could only get about 1/4 inch of grip... Might be enough for machine screws, definitely not self-tapping though.

BTW, you can pre-drill holes for screws... takes a while to do right, but they still hold better than nails, and the wood will never split.

Glue can be surprisingly strong. Sounds to me like it should be strong enough without adding fasteners. Good thinking on the pilot holes for screws, I completely overlooked that option. In my opinion, don't even bother with the screws unless you feel it is lacking structure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotswood;13726455 
I once built a SFF case out of 1/2-inch cherry. I attached the wooden outer shell to the aluminum frame via shortened #8 threaded inserts. I also had to use a ground down brad point bit so it wouldn't poke through.

CherrySFF3.jpg

CherrySFF6.jpg

Keep up the good work!

That's pretty cool! thumb.gif
2017 Rig
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 ASUS Crosshair VI Hero Gigabyte Windforce OC GTX 1700 G.Skill TridentZ DDR4-3200 (2x8GB) Model F4-320... 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
MyDigitalSSD MDNVME80-BPX-0256 Phillips DVD Windows 10 AOC E2752VH 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech K120 EVGA SuperNova 650 P2 Cooler Master CM-690 Razer Naga 2014 
  hide details  
Reply
2017 Rig
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 ASUS Crosshair VI Hero Gigabyte Windforce OC GTX 1700 G.Skill TridentZ DDR4-3200 (2x8GB) Model F4-320... 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
MyDigitalSSD MDNVME80-BPX-0256 Phillips DVD Windows 10 AOC E2752VH 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech K120 EVGA SuperNova 650 P2 Cooler Master CM-690 Razer Naga 2014 
  hide details  
Reply
post #33 of 120
Thread Starter 
Spotswood, that looks amazing. That's exactly the look I'm going for. What are the dimensions of that? It looks like almost a full ATX board based on the expansion slots. I did a small HTPC a while ago for my parents, but it's just in a boring black case.
post #34 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by davecasa;13732363 
Spotswood, that looks amazing. That's exactly the look I'm going for. What are the dimensions of that? It looks like almost a full ATX board based on the expansion slots. I did a small HTPC a while ago for my parents, but it's just in a boring black case.

Thanks. It was microatx (4 slots). The two rear fans were 80mm. Air entered up through a slot in the bottom front of the case. cool.gif
post #35 of 120
Thread Starter 
Update - Sides Part 1, and Bottom


Today I started working on the side panels. I began by combining the pieces which will make the left and right sides, ship lapping them together:

wTBBC.jpg


The overlap gives the joint much more strength, and doubles the glue surface compared to just butting the edges together. It also doesn't require the cuts to be perfect, although they were pretty close here. The disadvantage is that it never comes out just right, and needs a lot of sanding later on. On a related note, what is 1/2 inch minus 1/2 inch? Apparently, about 0.004 inches, the same thickness as a piece of paper biggrin.gif

tiQB2.jpg


Matching the grain is important. You'll always be able to see the line between the pieces if you're looking for it, but if the grain is continuous across the joint, no one will notice.

hx04y.jpg


These were then glued and clamped together. There was no good way to clamp down on the joint... I figured 75 pounds of lead should do the trick.

LfhqV.jpg


Next, I cut the top, bottom, front, and back panels to size, and cut the grooves that allow them to fit together, and give the left and right sides something to slide into. This picture I like to call "Don't use the fence on a small piece when you're that far away from it, you idiot." It's on the inside of the back, but the edge is going to show... I'll figure something out, maybe glue a small piece of wood in the gap. Could have been a lot worse, table saws can easily throw a piece of wood across the room.

fr225.jpg


On the bottom of the front and back, I have a difficult cut... the front and back need a notch to mate with the bottom, but the edge needs to remain intact for the sides to slide into. To accomplish this, I did a plunge cut (pushing the piece down onto the spinning blade, which is generally a bad idea), then finished it off with a chisel. It's not perfect, but this gets glued anyways, so it won't ever show.

bUlcj.jpg

7c6e7.jpg


Every side except the left has at least one cutout for various components... I started on the bottom because I both know where everything goes, and my mistakes wouldn't show as much. Here are the three cuts for the bottom piece marked out, all air intakes: A low speed 80 mm fan to cool the motherboard chipset, a passive intake, and a second passive intake which also provides access to the HDD cage. You'll see how these line up with the frame in a few more pictures.

ywo3X.jpg


Cutting these shapes out was a challenge; I considered freehanding on a router table, but decided this was a bad idea, especially after I screwed up the back on the table saw. I ultimately went with drilling holes in each of the corners, and using a scroll saw between them. The drill bit I used is called a Forstner... it makes very precise and clean holes, and is normally used for installing locks or other hardware. We happened to have a set, so I figured why not use them.

a557z.jpg


Here's an example of the holes they drill:

JCrk6.jpg


I drilled holes in each corner, then cut between the holes with a scroll saw.

qLSUm.jpg


The result was pretty rough, I'm worried about using this technique for the top and front of the case. I did get a bit better at it by the third cutout though, so maybe with the practice of the back I'll be okay.

Vqbv9.jpg


Enough sanding can fix just about any problem... All three cutouts cleaned up pretty nicely. It's possible to get nice square corners by cutting back in the other direction, but I liked how the rounded corners look, so I left them.

nDMER.jpg


Here's how it looks with the frame on top, everything lined up pretty well. It will of course need more sanding (which is about half the work I'm doing it seems like), but the frame is square, which was one of my concerns.

yV3iK.jpg


I then glued the bottom onto the frame. There's a huge glue surface, so I opted not to go with any fasteners. Also, I think I need more clamps, there's about 2 inches in the back without one.

uJt66.jpg


Tomorrow I think I'll start by figuring out the exact placement of the motherboard tray and making the back panel, then going from there.
post #36 of 120
Next time for cut outs like that, I recommend making a template to guide a router fitted with a flush cutting pattern bit.

Hmmmm.. not sure what finish you're ultimately going with but the router bit may result in some burning.
post #37 of 120
Looking nice, keep up the good work. thumb.gif
2017 Rig
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 ASUS Crosshair VI Hero Gigabyte Windforce OC GTX 1700 G.Skill TridentZ DDR4-3200 (2x8GB) Model F4-320... 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
MyDigitalSSD MDNVME80-BPX-0256 Phillips DVD Windows 10 AOC E2752VH 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech K120 EVGA SuperNova 650 P2 Cooler Master CM-690 Razer Naga 2014 
  hide details  
Reply
2017 Rig
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 ASUS Crosshair VI Hero Gigabyte Windforce OC GTX 1700 G.Skill TridentZ DDR4-3200 (2x8GB) Model F4-320... 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
MyDigitalSSD MDNVME80-BPX-0256 Phillips DVD Windows 10 AOC E2752VH 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech K120 EVGA SuperNova 650 P2 Cooler Master CM-690 Razer Naga 2014 
  hide details  
Reply
post #38 of 120
You are going to town on this project! When I first found it I though it was going to be a 2-3 month project but at this rate it may only be a week or two.

It's looking great so far. Ready to see more. Any thought on the finish? Stain? color? light or dark?
post #39 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotswood;13733074 
Next time for cut outs like that, I recommend making a template to guide a router fitted with a flush cutting pattern bit.

Hmmmm.. not sure what finish you're ultimately going with but the router bit may result in some burning.

I'll try this on a scrap, good suggestion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by animal0307;13733712 
You are going to town on this project! When I first found it I though it was going to be a 2-3 month project but at this rate it may only be a week or two.

It's looking great so far. Ready to see more. Any thought on the finish? Stain? color? light or dark?

Thanks, I'm trying to finish it before I go to San Diego in 2 weeks, not sure if I can keep up the 8 hour days in the shop though... It's going to be stained, something pretty dark. I like how Spotswood's HTPC looks so much that I might just copy that entirely and go with the cherry look, maybe a little darker and a little more red.
post #40 of 120
Staining pine, eh? Then you MUST apply this pre-conditioner. The stuff really works. I used it before applying linseed oil to the cherry case.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Water Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › [Build Log] Quiet, Minimalist Custom Wood Gaming PC