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Useable frequency response

post #1 of 3
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I noticed that my speakers say that the frequency response is from 120hz to 20kHz +/- 3db and useable frequency response down to 70hz but why when I play some test tones that are around 50hz it plays loud and clear? I can see the cones even move at 40hz or lower. But I can hear around 50hz. I thought that if it says that the lowest it goes is 70hz then it can play only that low and you can't hear anymore if it's any lower.
    
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post #2 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas84 View Post
I noticed that my speakers say that the frequency response is from 120hz to 20kHz /- 3db and useable frequency response down to 70hz but why when I play some test tones that are around 50hz it plays loud and clear? I can see the cones even move at 40hz or lower. But I can hear around 50hz. I thought that if it says that the lowest it goes is 70hz then it can play only that low and you can't hear anymore if it's any lower.
frequency response is just marketing BS. Everyone measures it differently. Some tones may emerge from a given speaker somewhat softer or louder than others that's frequency response. But what tone is it? If its just bass the speakers has to work twice as hard do you think you'll be able to get low on them?

The below middle C is 440 Hz another tone 3000hz but they will be within 3db with each other. But at let say 40hz it will be -6db to -9db.

Lets say for example A claim of frequency response that cites two frequency extremes unqualified by a dB specification (e.g., frequency response: 34 Hz - 22 kHz) is meaningless and useless. It may mean that although the speaker responds at 34 Hz--the cone moves a bit, perhaps--nothing will be audible because the speaker's response at 34 Hz is at -30 dB and inaudible!
post #3 of 3
I found out that basicly my speakers are 70hz -10db so basicly anything lower it will be less db so you will have to turn the volume up louder to hear the lower notes. Also I found out that since basicly the usable frequency is 70hz anything lower will have higher distortion but to human ears we think it's sounds pretty even it has alot of distortion.


"For detecting distortion at levels of less than 10%, the test frequencies had to be greater than 500 Hz. At 40 Hz, listeners accepted 100% distortion before they complained."
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