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Pagefile discussion - pitch in - Page 2

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragosmp View Post
@Princess Garnet: Virtual memory = RAM + Pagefile (8GB+1GB in your case).
What of this then?



My virtual memory should be 9GB according to that formula, but it's 17GB!? There's another 8GB coming from somewhere (my RAM is obviously 8GB and the thought at hand, but the physical RAM is already accounted for).

The question is, where?

Needless to say, I'm lost with it. It seems virtual memory, swap space, and page file are used interchangeably too which doesn't help.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragosmp View Post
NB - having pagefile disabled doesn't make a system unstable, as well as having it enabled doesn't make a system slow; the devil is in the details.
That's certainly something I can agree with after reading so much on the subject and still not being sure.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Garnet View Post
What of this then?



My virtual memory should be 9GB according to that formula, but it's 17GB!? There's another 8GB coming from somewhere (my RAM is obviously 8GB and the thought at hand, but the physical RAM is already accounted for).

The question is, where?

Needless to say, I'm lost with it. It seems virtual memory, swap space, and page file are used interchangeably too which doesn't help.
That's certainly something I can agree with after reading so much on the subject and still not being sure.
your gpu ram counts as well.
Applications ask windows to commit a certain amount of virtual memory to it. This does not mean the application will use all the memory committed, only that Windows promises to make it available if need be. When you look at memory usage only memory actually being used is show, not how much virtual memory has been committed to the process.
The commit limit of windows is RAM plus pagefile, because windows won't make a commitment it can keep. So you have a commit limit of xxx amount GB. Since committed virtual memory isn't actually used applications aren't afraid to ask for large commitments.
So it is quite common to have the virtual memory usage a lot larger than the actual memory usage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragosmp View Post
@Spoony: too few people have any idea how to use crash dumps, I'm not very convinced of their usefulness on a non-workstation PC

@Blameless: putting the pagefile on a second HDD can help performance. If the CPU is fast enough it can send files from the memory to the pagefile HDD while doing something else on the OS/app HDD. This system works if:
a) The primary isn't an SSD; pagefile on an HDD in stead of the SSD will actually slow things down
b) You don't do this on a laptop, few laptops have 2 HDD bays.

@Princess Garnet: Virtual memory = RAM + Pagefile (8GB+1GB in your case). Having a small Pagefile seems to be a bad idea, worse than not having it at all or having it at 1.5xRAM for the reasons written in the first post (the two quotes). When I say bad idea, the term is relative - it's also a bad idea to have a 32nm CPU @1.5V, far worse than having a small pagefile. However the optimal (see quote 1 in the 1st post) would be either to tune the pagefile for performance (disabled) or for all-cases stability.
NB - having pagefile disabled doesn't make a system unstable, as well as having it enabled doesn't make a system slow; the devil is in the details.
Apps never use RAM, only Virtual Memory; they have no access to the RAM itself. Windows then stores some of the content of Virtual Memory in RAM for performance reasons. It is just one of many things Windows stores in RAM. In reality Widows strives to use all available RAM all the time, for content in virtual memory or to cache other things.
Edited by Spooony - 6/9/11 at 8:51pm
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