Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Networking & Security › Sprint Overdrive Pro 4G
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sprint Overdrive Pro 4G

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I bought this recently, and I only get two bars of 4G service here in Great Lakes, IL. Which is about .34 down. I know they make a dock for this thing that also has an antenna, I was wondering if there is a different antenna that is made, either aftermarket or anyhting that will boost my signal by the slightest. I already have it sitting on the window sill on a clear summer day and it still only gets two bars. I know there is better service here on base, because Ive went to the chow hall and have gotten 6mbps down 1.01mbps up on this with 4 bars.


I was also wondering what CLEAR™ internet is, I know it uses WiMAX which is supposed to be better? Sorry, Im not caught up on my computer lingo lately. Also I forgot to mention, the laptop I'm using has Intel WiMAX built into it.

Im basically asking you guys what would be best for me and my Asus g73 and gaming on non-wired non-local internet.

Thanks for reading.



Hotsopt device - http://shop.sprint.com/mysprint/shop/phone_details.jsp?ensembleId=SWAC802


CLEAR™ - http://www.clear.com/
post #2 of 13
4G is a mobile network.
No matter what your provider says, it's not a real Internet connection (i.e. it is not using TCP/IP). Mobile networks emulate some protocols from the TCP/IP protocol suite, among them TCP, UDP and ICMP. They only do it to a certain degree and in most cases the emulation is not entirely transparent (for example, many providers reduce the quality of JPEG images when browsing Internet web pages to conserve bandwidth). To avoid applications running into timeouts all the time, many signal a successful TCP SYN-SYNACK-ACK handshake even though an end-to-end connection hasn't been established yet.
It's not a true Internet connection and you should not expect it to do miracles.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
So, what would you recommend?
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerberus;13875175 
So, what would you recommend?

anything but a mobile internet. Sometimes when you got a good reception if the cell is full it still slows down. 4g is basically 3g with a wider reception area.
I would get a router its a way better internet experience
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooony;13875756 
anything but a mobile internet. Sometimes when you got a good reception if the cell is full it still slows down. 4g is basically 3g with a wider reception area.
I would get a router its a way better internet experience

I would If I could, the barracks I am staying in right now does not offer internet service, nor does it support you being able to get a connection to the room.
post #6 of 13
Mobile internet is "real" internet... I don't know how you can say its "not real"... by your standard of "real", Comcast wouldn't be real and neither would AT&T DSL or FIOS. All those services use different forms of caching. The OP is clearly on a base, unable to get a landline internet connection. 3G and 4G use an IP Stack, they connect to the same servers and use the same encapsulation to transfer content. Please, don't make attempts to mislead others.

As for OP's question:
CLEAR™ is a provider of WiMax internet services (also known as 802.16). Sprint uses CLEAR as one of their providers in many of the regions they offer their "4G" in.
There are aftermarket antennas and signal boosters that work. An antenna would be the cheaper solution, as the extra gain might be enough to give you the better signal you require for increased speed. If your 4G device allows for an external antenna, make sure you get one that is compatible with the device (as there are many different ways to attach an antenna (SMA, R-SMA, TN, N) and you want to make sure you don't get an antenna that wont connect properly. Buying the wrong antenna will force you to use adapters which both increase the cost and lose some of the signal gained from the antenna in the first place. If your 4G device does not allow for external antennas, you can also remove the plastic casing and find the point on the board you can solder an antenna onto yourself. This is above novice level though, and I would suggest if you go with this specific option, that you follow an online guide and / or have a friend with this skillset assist you.

If that doesn't work - then active boosters (or signal repeaters) can be used. You would need to plug the booster into the wall near the area you get the best signal from, and depending on how much you spend, you can get anywhere from a 6ft to a 100ft "bubble" of better service. These devices are not cheap though.

Make sure if you go with the boosting device or the antenna option, you get devices that specifically say either WiMax or 2.5 GHz as their frequency.
Dissonance
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom II X6 1100T MSI 890FXA-GD65 Sapphire HD6850 G.SKILL Sniper 8GB DDR3 1866 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
64GB SSD 2TB WDGreen 1.5TB Seagate 2x2TB Samsung Lite-On 24X iHAS124 Windows 7 x64 Professional 24" WestingHouse 1200p + 32" Astar 1080i 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech G15 RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W COOLER MASTER HAF 912 RC-912-KKN1 Logitech G9x Laser 
Mouse Pad
None 
  hide details  
Reply
Dissonance
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom II X6 1100T MSI 890FXA-GD65 Sapphire HD6850 G.SKILL Sniper 8GB DDR3 1866 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
64GB SSD 2TB WDGreen 1.5TB Seagate 2x2TB Samsung Lite-On 24X iHAS124 Windows 7 x64 Professional 24" WestingHouse 1200p + 32" Astar 1080i 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech G15 RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W COOLER MASTER HAF 912 RC-912-KKN1 Logitech G9x Laser 
Mouse Pad
None 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
I did a little bit of searching and I found that it uses this type of connector.


image.php?type=T&id=1934
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerberus;13876078 
I would If I could, the barracks I am staying in right now does not offer internet service, nor does it support you being able to get a connection to the room.

ok. For gaming The mobile network is horrible. Terrible lag. Reason?
The modems don't stay at 4g. What they don't tell you if it doesn't constantly get fed with lots of data it drops down to 3g. I had to make a ping file to keep mine on hspda because the cell networks don't tell you these things they just come out and lie with the suppose speeds. Especially in udp you have to rely on other users to get the speed up. The thing I can suggest is you subscribe to a connectivity service like your-freedom to try and avoid the lag. Remember with mobile there's a underlying network before you get onto the internet.
Sprint has the best coverage but Its strange that you struggle to get a decent signal. With a bad signal your going to struggle to get it to stay on 4g. Remember everytime it switches from 3g to 4g or hspda or huspa it looses connection. Bad very bad for gaming.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayekalooter;13876336 
Mobile internet is "real" internet... I don't know how you can say its "not real"... by your standard of "real", Comcast wouldn't be real and neither would AT&T DSL or FIOS. All those services use different forms of caching. The OP is clearly on a base, unable to get a landline internet connection. 3G and 4G use an IP Stack, they connect to the same servers and use the same encapsulation to transfer content. Please, don't make attempts to mislead others.

As for OP's question:
CLEAR6¾4 is a provider of WiMax internet services (also known as 802.16). Sprint uses CLEAR as one of their providers in many of the regions they offer their "4G" in.
There are aftermarket antennas and signal boosters that work. An antenna would be the cheaper solution, as the extra gain might be enough to give you the better signal you require for increased speed. If your 4G device allows for an external antenna, make sure you get one that is compatible with the device (as there are many different ways to attach an antenna (SMA, R-SMA, TN, N) and you want to make sure you don't get an antenna that wont connect properly. Buying the wrong antenna will force you to use adapters which both increase the cost and lose some of the signal gained from the antenna in the first place. If your 4G device does not allow for external antennas, you can also remove the plastic casing and find the point on the board you can solder an antenna onto yourself. This is above novice level though, and I would suggest if you go with this specific option, that you follow an online guide and / or have a friend with this skillset assist you.

If that doesn't work - then active boosters (or signal repeaters) can be used. You would need to plug the booster into the wall near the area you get the best signal from, and depending on how much you spend, you can get anywhere from a 6ft to a 100ft "bubble" of better service. These devices are not cheap though.

Make sure if you go with the boosting device or the antenna option, you get devices that specifically say either WiMax or 2.5 GHz as their frequency.

I already explained why its not real internet. Read my post again what's the difference and why I say it ain't real. Its simulated. It is not using TCP/IP
post #10 of 13
I guess it depends on what you consider "real" Internet. It IS a dial up technology ... each 4g/3g device (or even a 3g enabled tablet) has a phone number. Your 3g device runs through a "proxy" where the traffic reaches the Internet.

They get ... decent speeds out of them. I have a few clients out in the country that, for some reason, have a server in their place. I have had to set them up with the 3g device connected to a wireless router (wirelessly!) and then connect that to the server.

The ping isn't terrible, though I've never been able to try to game on one.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6300 @ 2.3 GHz Foxconn Intel x3100 4.5 Rendition 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
160+500 DVDRW Server 08 x64 Princeton 17'' square 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Unicomp Germanic Model M 250W Dell Vostro 200 Gateway Ball Mouse 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6300 @ 2.3 GHz Foxconn Intel x3100 4.5 Rendition 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
160+500 DVDRW Server 08 x64 Princeton 17'' square 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Unicomp Germanic Model M 250W Dell Vostro 200 Gateway Ball Mouse 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Networking & Security
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Networking & Security › Sprint Overdrive Pro 4G