Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Noob question
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Noob question

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hello people,
I'm new to overclocking, and i have a question
I know the the clock speed of your cpu = FSB*multiplier, but
doesn't your CPU need access to like the ram and other component in order to do things?
so if it has 10 'internal' clocks without 'talking' to the other components, what can i do in those clocks?
Thx and bye
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 7
Can you rephrase that?
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k Gigabyte Z77-UD5H-WB Golden GTX 670 Windforce 3X 2 x 4GB GSkill RipJawsX 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 4 64GB- WD Caviar Black 1TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 7 Dell U2311H IPS 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
xArmor iOne U9BL MX Blues Seasonic x750 LIAN LI PC-T60B Logitech G500 
Audio
Modded JVC HA-RX900 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k Gigabyte Z77-UD5H-WB Golden GTX 670 Windforce 3X 2 x 4GB GSkill RipJawsX 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 4 64GB- WD Caviar Black 1TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 7 Dell U2311H IPS 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
xArmor iOne U9BL MX Blues Seasonic x750 LIAN LI PC-T60B Logitech G500 
Audio
Modded JVC HA-RX900 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
"In computing, the clock multiplier (or CPU multiplier or bus/core ratio) measures the ratio of an internal CPU clock rate to the externally supplied clock. A CPU with a 10x multiplier will thus see 10 internal cycles (produced by PLL-based frequency multiplier circuitry) for every external clock cycle. "
thats from wikipedia.
So what i wondered, is what the use of those 10 internal cycles is, if the cpu cannot acces the ram or other component in those cycles?
hope i can make myself clear
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 7
Oh, yea I see what your saying.

I am no CPU expert, but I would guess those are cycles for processing the data that the CPU already pulled from the RAM.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k Gigabyte Z77-UD5H-WB Golden GTX 670 Windforce 3X 2 x 4GB GSkill RipJawsX 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 4 64GB- WD Caviar Black 1TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 7 Dell U2311H IPS 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
xArmor iOne U9BL MX Blues Seasonic x750 LIAN LI PC-T60B Logitech G500 
Audio
Modded JVC HA-RX900 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770k Gigabyte Z77-UD5H-WB Golden GTX 670 Windforce 3X 2 x 4GB GSkill RipJawsX 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 4 64GB- WD Caviar Black 1TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 7 Dell U2311H IPS 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
xArmor iOne U9BL MX Blues Seasonic x750 LIAN LI PC-T60B Logitech G500 
Audio
Modded JVC HA-RX900 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 7
A processor doesn't absolutely need RAM to work; it is used to process information, wherever the information comes from. Besides from what I remember pretty much everything the CPU processes comes from the cache memory; the only other thing it needs to work is an opcode to know which operation to execute. Normally the data in the cache comes from the RAM but this isn't necessarily the case. As long as there is stuff in the cache memory and the processor stil has instructions to process it will normally keep running.

This is basically what I've learned from my CPU architecture class, but this is mostly theory and keep in mind that different processors can work completely differently.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-2500k ASUS P8P67 Pro EVGA GTX 570 G.Skill 8 GB (4 x 2) DDR-1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Samsung 1 tb 7200 RPM Windows 7 Professional ASUS LED 23" Corsair HX750W 
Case
CoolerMaster HAF 922 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-2500k ASUS P8P67 Pro EVGA GTX 570 G.Skill 8 GB (4 x 2) DDR-1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Samsung 1 tb 7200 RPM Windows 7 Professional ASUS LED 23" Corsair HX750W 
Case
CoolerMaster HAF 922 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
oke thanks,
so basicly it works from cache during those cycles and works through the instructions it still has to do.
Still leaves me wondering tho, if only one instruction can be 'given' to the cpu in the time the cpu processes 10, how the cpu can have instructions left to do.
if for example, it gets 1 instruction per second (just an example), but it can proces 10 in a second, than there'll never be a 'queue' of instructions.

but i think i'm just thinking to much and should just accept that higher cpu clock = good, but i just wanna know this kind of stuff, else i feel like im just doing the stuff im told to do without understanding it
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 2600k asus maximus IV extreme 6950 flex 2x WD caviar black 1,5TB raid 1 
Case
HAF 932 AMD 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 7
The way a processor works is incredibly complicated, especially if you go into the specifics of how it interacts with cache and ram.

In general I suppose the speed at which the instructions are transferred is faster than the actual speed of the processor. Now I know that the processors don't simply execute instructions one by one at a certain frequency; its more complicated than that. If you're really interested about cpu architectures, there are tons of good books on it, but be prepared because it is probably one of the most complicated subjects of computer science (it's actually closer to electronics or electric engineering than computer science).
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-2500k ASUS P8P67 Pro EVGA GTX 570 G.Skill 8 GB (4 x 2) DDR-1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Samsung 1 tb 7200 RPM Windows 7 Professional ASUS LED 23" Corsair HX750W 
Case
CoolerMaster HAF 922 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-2500k ASUS P8P67 Pro EVGA GTX 570 G.Skill 8 GB (4 x 2) DDR-1600 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
Samsung 1 tb 7200 RPM Windows 7 Professional ASUS LED 23" Corsair HX750W 
Case
CoolerMaster HAF 922 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Noob question