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True facts about ohms - Page 5

post #41 of 44
Speaker power ratings have nothing to do with how much power they will consume. A less efficient speaker will consume more power than a more efficient design to achieve similar sound levels.
A speaker rated at 4 ohms will draw twice the current as a similar one rated at 8 ohms. Impedance and sensitivity are the critical metrics in determining how power hungry a particular speaker will be.

Parallel Connection
Z1*Z2 / (Z1 + Z2)

Z1 is speaker set # 1's impedance
and
Z2 is speaker set # 2's impedance.

Series
Z1 + Z2

If your uncertain get a speaker switchbox from Niles. They perform clever impedance tricks to perform a save load on your speakers

In the parallel case, be careful not to use speakers with impedances lower than 8ohms (nom) as your equivalent parallel impedance seen by the amplifier while both sets of speakers are running simultaneously will be 4 ohms.

series case may degrade overall sound quality and halve the output volume, but it is safer to drive low impedance speakers this way with weaker power amplifiers. Try to use similar speakers as it will help reduce phasing problems and will better cope with sensitivity issues by both sets of speakers running simultaneously

For amplifier running hot. The ones with the big heatsinks and that runs hot are normally the ones heavy into Class A operations. Check the rail fuses its normally two per channel to get it true power rating.
Edited by Spooony - 6/27/11 at 4:19pm
post #42 of 44
Thread Starter 
Well I did find a Kenwood receiver that has a Ohms switch and I can select it to less than 8 ohms or 8 ohms or more but does that really make the receiver capeable of handling 4 ohms speakers? It did say that if I have two pairs of 8 ohms speakers then set it to less than 8 ohms since two pairs of 8 ohms will be like one pair of 4 ohms. Then if I just have one pair of 8 ohms speakers then it says set it to 8 ohms or more on the manual. I got this receiver used from Ebay but I thought maybe this would work the best. It's an older receiver made around 1995 but according to the seller still works great. The model is KR-A3070.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooony View Post
Speaker power ratings have nothing to do with how much power they will consume. A less efficient speaker will consume more power than a more efficient design to achieve similar sound levels.
A speaker rated at 4 ohms will draw twice the current as a similar one rated at 8 ohms. Impedance and sensitivity are the critical metrics in determining how power hungry a particular speaker will be.

Parallel Connection
Z1*Z2 / (Z1 + Z2)

Z1 is speaker set # 1's impedance
and
Z2 is speaker set # 2's impedance.

Series
Z1 + Z2

If your uncertain get a speaker switchbox from Niles. They perform clever impedance tricks to perform a save load on your speakers

In the parallel case, be careful not to use speakers with impedances lower than 8ohms (nom) as your equivalent parallel impedance seen by the amplifier while both sets of speakers are running simultaneously will be 4 ohms.

series case may degrade overall sound quality and halve the output volume, but it is safer to drive low impedance speakers this way with weaker power amplifiers. Try to use similar speakers as it will help reduce phasing problems and will better cope with sensitivity issues by both sets of speakers running simultaneously

For amplifier running hot. The ones with the big heatsinks and that runs hot are normally the ones heavy into Class A operations. Check the rail fuses its normally two per channel to get it true power rating.
Or he could just read this: http://www.audioholics.com/education...rt-ii-speakers
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceman23 View Post
this acutally
http://www.audioholics.com/education...o-measurements
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