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Intel e2160 OC'd to 2.9ghz but back to 1.8 now

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I have:

Intel Pentium E2160 Allendale 1.8GHz 1MB L2 Cache LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor BX80557E2160

for cooling I have

ARCTIC COOLING Freezer 7 Pro Rev.2 92mm Fluid Dynamic CPU Cooler

and motherboard
GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L LGA 775 Intel P35 ATX All Solid Capacitor Intel Motherboard

My CPU has been OC'd since late 2007 at 2.99ghz. Recently (just yesterday), I reformatted my computer since I had some virus issues and it was time for a reformat anyway (been about 1 1/2 years since last reformat).

Now, I just happen to check what core speed my CPU is at, and it says 1.8ghz, which is stock. I have no idea how long it's been at stock. I can remember checking just a few months ago it was at 2.9. The last time I reformatted before yesterday was early 2010, and my CPU speeds stayed the same after that reformat.

Now I haven't dealt with overclocking since 2007 when I first did it, but I remember it was very easy even though I was a little afraid to deal with it. I actually got some help from online forums (not overclock.net).

I read the the Newbie guide to overclocking for Intels which helped me remember. All I can remember doing is raising the FSB in small increments and maybe the multiplier as well. After each increment I ran tests/viewed the temps until I got to a steady 2.99. The programs I used were orthos and everest for the tests. I don't remember anything about touching the voltage though.

Does anyone have an idea on how my e2160 just went back to stock? I never got any crashes or anything that would make me suspicious. Ultimately, is it safe to OC it again now?
post #2 of 22
Did you accidentially reset CMOS when you did the reformat? That would most certainly cause a return to stock. Also, instability caused by degrading components from excessive voltage would also force a reset.

try returning the overclock to where it was before and then run 30 passes of Intel Burn test using 2048MB of ram. If it passes that then it might have been a simple glitch somewhere that forced the reset. If it fails, then something somewhere did not like sustained speeds that high and you have to figure out what.
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post
Did you accidentially reset CMOS when you did the reformat? That would most certainly cause a return to stock. Also, instability caused by degrading components from excessive voltage would also force a reset.
I do not know how to reset CMOS, I thought this was something that was on the motherboard itself? When i reformatted I got nothing about CMOS, I just formatted a partition (had windows on it already) and installed windows again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post
try returning the overclock to where it was before and then run 30 passes of Intel Burn test using 2048MB of ram. If it passes that then it might have been a simple glitch somewhere that forced the reset. If it fails, then something somewhere did not like sustained speeds that high and you have to figure out what.
I'd like to know how I can go back to my overclock again. I'm going to take a pic of my BIOS display so you can see the terms, ok? Most of it I remember, but I'm a little unsure.

edit* Here's the pic of Bios http://i56.tinypic.com/2rd91fk.jpg
So the CPU Clock Ratio is the Multiplier? Or is that the System Memory Multiplier?

I found a thread on overclock about the what each setting means

CPU Clock Ratio: Allows you to alter the clock ratio for the installed CPU.
CPU Host Clock Control: Enables or disables the control of CPU host clock. Enabled will allow the CPU Host Frequency
item below to be configurable.
CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): Allows you to manually set the CPU host frequency.
PCI Express Frequency(Mhz): Allows you to manually set the PCIe clock frequency.
System Memory Multiplier: Allows you to set the system memory multiplier.
System Voltage Control: Determines whether to manually set the system voltages.
DDR2 OverVoltage Control: Allows you to set the memory voltage.
PCI-E OverVoltage Control: Allows you to set the PCIe bus voltage.
FSB OverVoltage Control: Allows you to set the Front Side Bus voltage.
(G)MCH OverVoltage Control: Allows you to set the North Bridge voltage.
CPU Voltage Control: Allows you to set the CPU voltage.

which one of these is the FSB? Is it Memory Frequency?
Edited by nachos - 6/16/11 at 2:32pm
post #4 of 22
Ok... enable CPU host clock control, that will allow you to change the FSB. Then change it as you wish. be forewarned it will require increasing the CPU voltage.

Another few things: set the PCI-E frequency to 100mhz, it does not like going much faster than that, and keep your memory below 900mhz unless you plan on overclocking that as well. Speaking of your memory, what is it?
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post
Ok... enable CPU host clock control, that will allow you to change the FSB. Then change it as you wish. be forewarned it will require increasing the CPU voltage.

Another few things: set the PCI-E frequency to 100mhz, it does not like going much faster than that, and keep your memory below 900mhz unless you plan on overclocking that as well. Speaking of your memory, what is it?
Here's my memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231098

Yea I enabled CPU host clock control to see what happens, where is the FSB?
And what do I change the CPU Voltage control to?
Edited by nachos - 6/16/11 at 2:52pm
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by nachos View Post
Here's my memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231098

Yea I enabled CPU host clock control to see what happens, where is the FSB? Is it CPU Host Frequency right below it?
yeah. Watch the memory setting below it, as it MAY change when you change the FSB. Just to be on the safe side, increase the memory voltage to 2V. It can easily handle it, and gives you a little extra room to play with.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post
yeah. Watch the memory setting below it, as it MAY change when you change the FSB. Just to be on the safe side, increase the memory voltage to 2V. It can easily handle it, and gives you a little extra room to play with.
ok great, when I enable clock control, the FSB is at 332. It allows me to change any digits from 100-700. I thought it was the multipler x the FSB = whatever GHz your cpu is?

332 x 9 is around 2.7ghz isnt it?
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by nachos View Post
ok great, when I enable clock control, the FSB is at 332. It allows me to change any digits from 100-700. I thought it was the multipler x the FSB = whatever GHz your cpu is?

332 x 9 is around 2.7ghz isnt it?
exactly. Like i said, you may need to increase the core voltage to get to the clock speed you desire.
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post
exactly. Like i said, you may need to increase the core voltage to get to the clock speed you desire.
9x332 is actually 2.99, which is what my cpu is supposed to be at,

im totally confused, and I did not change my voltage when I first OC'd back in 2007

edit* I think I get it, since my CPU Host clock control is Disabled, that's why it's not at 2.99?
Edited by nachos - 6/16/11 at 3:24pm
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by nachos View Post
9x332 is actually 2.99, which is what my cpu is supposed to be at,

im totally confused, and I did not change my voltage when I first OC'd back in 2007

edit* I think I get it, since my CPU Host clock control is Disabled, that's why it's not at 2.99?
maybe. Turn it on and see what happens.
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