Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Dpi and sensitivity
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dpi and sensitivity - Page 3

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
DPI/CPI does not measure your accuracy.
I never said that. I said it measures the accuracy of the mouse sensor. The higher your DPI, the less mouse stuttering you'll encounter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
All it measures is how small of movements the mouse sensor can detect.
I know. Combine a high DPI with a low sensitivity setting, and you have a more accurate mouse, as it'll be polling its location more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
It's physically easier to be accurate with a lower CPI/sensitivity as you have more room irl to hit the same size target onscreen.
It's hard to be accurate with a low DPI, trust me. I've been figuring that out sniping in BC2 recently. I have an older Dynex optical mouse (nothing fancy) because of the pixel skipping (yes, it occurs, Glymbol. I'm not sure where you're getting the idea that it doesn't). If I'm sniping from a relatively long range, where small reticule movements are required, I sometimes have a hard time pinpointing an enemy's head, as it'll skip over it on occasion.

Bold: You can have the same thing with a high DPI by lowering the in-game sensitivity, without sacrificing precision.
Edited by aroc91 - 7/23/11 at 5:11pm
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 920 SABERTOOTH X58 Gigabyte GTX 970 Corsair  
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
WD 320GB WD 1TB Hitachi 1TB CM Hyper 212 Plus 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
Windows 10 Pro 24" Sceptre 20" Asus Corsair TX750 
Case
Antec 1200 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 920 SABERTOOTH X58 Gigabyte GTX 970 Corsair  
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
WD 320GB WD 1TB Hitachi 1TB CM Hyper 212 Plus 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
Windows 10 Pro 24" Sceptre 20" Asus Corsair TX750 
Case
Antec 1200 
  hide details  
Reply
post #22 of 27
I know the issue, but name "pixel skipping" for it is wrong, it has nothing to do with pixels . When your sensitivity setting is to high, with some huge resolution it becomes clearly visible. On low res it's still the same though, since smallest possible angle of turn hasn't changed. Low resolution masks it only but not completely. I tested this some time ago using CS 1.6 on 640x480 res. Turning by 0.022° (sensitivity 1.0) is still visible on such a low resolution. It sounds funny but its true
Edited by Glymbol - 7/23/11 at 3:57pm
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glymbol View Post
There is no difference in max speed using hardware or interpolated 900 CPI.
There is a difference between hardware and interpolated DPI. Maybe not in max tracking speed if you go down but there are other differences.

Quote:
Everything over 6/11 yes, but 1/11 - 4/11 are ok.
settings other than 6/11 can cause problems in some older games.

Quote:
Not true at all.
People who know infinitely more about Counterstrike and the inner workings of the Goldsource engine than you or me say CS 1.6 has negative acceleration below around 1.8 sensitivity and that the game was not designed to be played with mice with more than 500 or so DPI.

Quote:
There isn't such thing as pixel of movement or pixel skipping.
Can you not read? A pixel of movement means the cursor is moved one pixel on screen. You need to move the mouse so that the cursor moves 3840 pixels horizontally to do a 180 degree heel turn at 1080p resolution in an FPS if the game has a standard 90 degree field of view.

pixel skipping does occur when you take a low dpi mouse and increase the sensitivity enough to try to make it feel similar to a higher dpi mouse. Go on old versions of windows and crank the sensitivity past 6/11 and the cursor skips pixels. Eventually you'll skip over entire pixels in the smallest amount of movement the mouse can detect ie one count/dot of mouse movement will move the cursor 2 pixels or more on screen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aroc91 View Post
I never said that. I said it measures the accuracy of the mouse sensor. The higher your DPI, the less mouse stuttering you'll encounter.
Is stuttering the same as jittering? DPI has nothing to do with jittering. High DPI can actually exacerbate mouse jittering if your mouse is prone to jitter eg Razor Abyssus. The solution is to get a better mouse.

Quote:
I know. Combine a high DPI with a low sensitivity setting, and you have a more accurate mouse, as it'll be polling its location more.
Doesn't really mean anything and as I said lowering the sensitivity beyond a certain point causes problems in some games. Polling rate and CPI have nothing to do with each other.

Quote:
It's hard to be accurate with a low DPI, trust me. I've been figuring that out sniping in BC2 recently. I have an older Dynex optical mouse (nothing fancy) because of the pixel skipping (yes, it occurs, Glymbol. I'm not sure where you're getting the idea that it doesn't). If I'm sniping from a relatively long range, where small reticule movements are required, I sometimes have a hard time pinpointing an enemy's head, as it'll skip over it on occasion.
BC2 allows you to set a different sensitivity for each weapons. It sounds like your mouse itself has issues or your sens settings are whack and it's giving you more than 1 pixel of onscreen movement for every count of physical movement with the sniper rifle.

Quote:
You can have the same thing with a high DPI by lowering the in-game sensitivity, without sacrificing precision.
It can actually be less precise. Say I am on 400 CPI at 1 count:1 pixel sens so that it moves 400 pixels for every inch of movement. Say you are on 1500 CPI at 3.75 counts:1 pixel sens to try to emulate 400 CPI. Your sensor can't physically detect the exact 3.75 counts of movement to move the cursor one pixel so it or the software has to interpolate. The 400 CPI sensor doesn't meaning it tracks more precisely at 400 pixels of movement per inch.

Even if it was the same, it's still not as efficient as lowering the sensitivity (CPI) at the hardware end eliminates software variables such as the aforementioned Counter-Strike <1.8 deceleration.
Edited by Dannibal - 7/23/11 at 9:01pm
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post

People who know infinitely more about Counterstrike and the inner workings of the Goldsource engine than you or me say CS 1.6 has negative acceleration below around 1.8 sensitivity and that the game was not designed to be played with mice with more than 500 or so DPI.
I know a lot about the source, gold source, and older quake engines, and there is no specific rule about the engine causing negative acceleration at or around "1.8 sensitivity"

The negative acceleration you speak off is actually caused by goldsrc utilizing WM_MOUSEMOVE rather than WM_INPUT. Instead of reading movements directly from the mouse, the game re-centers your cursor based on the number of frames youre able to produce. A higher framer rate will decrease the chances of negative accel, although the problem arises due to CS1.6 being capped at 100 FPS.

Now, you may be able to cause negative acceleration by using a CPI setting of 400 along with 1.8 sensitivity, but you have to also factor in screen resolution, sensor limits, and rate in which you're actually moving your mouse.

Believe it or not, but larger resolutions actually decrease the chances of negative acceleration on the windows/game engine side of things.

Also, the whole thing about the game not being designed to be played with mice over 500 CPI is pure BS. They're either using direct/raw input or they aren't. There are plenty of games that still use WM_MOUSEMOVE to this day. Hell, source was the same until a bunch of us on the Valve/Steam forums pushed for raw input when HPE took over.

Quote:
(g * fps) / (2 * ((d * w) / 0.0254))
Credit to injx for the formula.

http://www.phoon.us/mouse/

Here's phoon's calculator if any of you need it.




Quote:
Originally Posted by aroc91 View Post
It's hard to be accurate with a low DPI, trust me. I've been figuring that out sniping in BC2 recently. I have an older Dynex optical mouse (nothing fancy) because of the pixel skipping (yes, it occurs, Glymbol. I'm not sure where you're getting the idea that it doesn't). If I'm sniping from a relatively long range, where small reticule movements are required, I sometimes have a hard time pinpointing an enemy's head, as it'll skip over it on occasion.

Bold: You can have the same thing with a high DPI by lowering the in-game sensitivity, without sacrificing precision.
You cant really say that without factoring the screen resolution, fov, and cm or inch/360 you're playing at. You're right to an extent, but it's pretty meaningless to say that it's hard to be accurate with 400 DPI without giving insight on your setup (and even playing style).


Refer to the calculator above.
Edited by Skylit - 7/23/11 at 11:05pm
post #25 of 27
Thanks
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
There is a difference between hardware and interpolated DPI. Maybe not in max tracking speed if you go down but there are other differences.
...
settings other than 6/11 can cause problems in some older games.
List problems and differences please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
People who know infinitely more about Counterstrike and the inner workings of the Goldsource engine than you or me say CS 1.6 has negative acceleration below around 1.8 sensitivity and that the game was not designed to be played with mice with more than 500 or so DPI.
There are lot of myths, some still believe that CPL mousefix is magically increasing mouse precision, and they are using it together with -noforce commands . Negative acceleration is all about max speed which depends on FPS, resolution and CPI or rather CPI * Windows' speed. Use calculator from Skylit's post to determine how fast you can turn. With correct setup you can have over 4m/s max speed, and believe me sensitivity, m_yaw, m_pitch has nothing to do with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannibal View Post
Can you not read? A pixel of movement means the cursor is moved one pixel on screen. You need to move the mouse so that the cursor moves 3840 pixels horizontally to do a 180 degree heel turn at 1080p resolution in an FPS if the game has a standard 90 degree field of view.
There is not such thing in 3D. Every 1 CPI turns visible scene by angle: 1 * sensitivity * m_yaw (horizontally). For CS the smallest angle would be 0.022° since this is standard m_yaw and you can't set sensitivity below 1.0. Try it yourself, set m_yaw 90 and sensitivity 1.0, there will be only 4 possible directions to turn . Believe me, screen resolution has nothing to do with it .
Edited by Glymbol - 7/24/11 at 7:19am
post #27 of 27
Anything above 800 DPI in IMO is useless. Above that its impossible to do anything because if you barely touch the mouse its moving at mach 4
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mice
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Dpi and sensitivity