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Before I lap it.. - Page 2

post #11 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post
does that ruin the cpu? i dont understand what lapping does lol
It flattens the heatsink to allow better contact with the cooler. Which translates to better heat transfer.
post #12 of 53
Lapping reduces the on load temps of the CPU. It doesn't ruin it but it does indeed void the warranty.

Comps
post #13 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom_Dave View Post
Definitely figure 8. The same process is used in high precision metal working. Using any movement other than a figure 8 is much more likely to take off more material in a localized area instead of an even amount over the entire surface.

If you just went back and forth you'd likely end up with an angled surface instead of a planar surface.
I like ... well ... how can a figure of 8 possibly be uniform with a human arm ?
Shall do it nevertheless..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tori View Post
does that ruin the cpu? i dont understand what lapping does lol
What about copper being exposed to the atmosphere now ?
Wonder how it'll fare.. the whole thing's not going to be covered in thermal grease . I fear for it .. I do live in a humid area and the copper on my old hyper 212+ DID loose it's sheen and turn really dull and partially black too at some points. So should I in that case simply take a 600 Grit paper and polish it till the first signs of copper emerge ?? Forget the whole mirror finish and hope for a better than before surface ?
Unless, my apprehensions are entirely baseless...
I've never had a processor fail on me so the warranty is NOT a concern..

ALSO , I may in the future sell this processor off for BD . .. will aluminum and copper in contact create problems like they do in waterblocks?

Quote:
Originally Posted by compuman145 View Post
Yep, sandpaper, start off at around 600 grit and move up to 2400 grit.

Worked a treat on mine

C
So I'll take 600 --> grind it a bit .. the second I see a bit of copper , I'll switch to a higher grit and try not to expose too much copper ?


Thanks folks !
post #14 of 53
It gives you full step by step instructions in that video, you literally just need to follow it and you'll get the best results.

There's nothing more to really say other than just follow the video, it's the one I recommend to everyone who is going to attempt lapping. Just take your time, watch the video a few times and then you're fine.

Oh, and copper is non-reactive to oxygen unless it's mixed with a liquid or other minerals, basically, nothing is going to happen with it.
Edited by compuman145 - 7/24/11 at 9:30am
post #15 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by 0razor1 View Post
I like ... well ... how can a figure of 8 possibly be uniform with a human arm ?
Shall do it nevertheless..
Don't just take my word for it. Use your Google-fu. I'm speaking from years of experience in precision metal working. Lapping is a form of metal planing and has been done in a figure 8 since long before I was born.

There is a little technique to it though, if you want to get it plane within .00001". But I don't think you need a heatsink to be that precise and you wouldn't be doing it on glass. You'd be using a marble surface plate.

In the end, regardless of how you decide to do it, it's probably not going to make a huge difference considering what it is being used for. Unless you really screw it up.
post #16 of 53
Lapping can knock 10c off your on load temps. My on load were 83c - 85c, now they are 70c - 73c
post #17 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by compuman145 View Post
Lapping can knock 10c off your on load temps. My on load were 83c - 85c, now they are 70c - 73c
I didn't say lapping vs. not lapping was not important. I meant that the technique used to do it isn't going to make a huge difference.

If all heatsinks come like my i7 did, then they could all use a good lapping. If you can visually see curves in the heatsink, then it is not even CLOSE to being planar.
post #18 of 53
Thread Starter 
Thanks folks
Like
Full lapping then, I'm home in a couple of days , look forward to doing it then xD

Why do they bother to nickel plate it anyway ?

What about wetting the surface?? I believe use the metal's own particles as an abrasive can speed things up And what about all that static Isn't staic bad :O I feel stupid!

He does use a figure of 8 when he's on 1000 grit, the guy in the video , part 2

Thanks again ppl!
post #19 of 53
Ahhh i'm with you now.

The EK waterblocks are machine ground to a flat surface, they are an immaculate peice of engineering and machine work.


NO! don't wet the surface, there is no need at all. And you wear a short sleeved shirt to reduce the risk of static.
post #20 of 53
Thread Starter 
Nice
England managed to come back after 70-5
India 50-1 right now , chasing a target of ~ 500 or some ..

I don't even like cricket anymore Still , if it interests you folks !!

Believe the EK blacks had some problems with their new nickel consensing techniques.. well

The V6GT I'm using has a flat surface too, but not a mirror finish !! Finding pics and attaching .. .



xxxxxxxxxxxxx

From hardware canucks :

Meanwhile, the V6 GT’s base shines just like a new sports car on the show room floor. It may not be the absolute best we have ever seen, but the finish on this base is certainly above average with only a major swirl mark in the center marring the otherwise perfectly polished base.

The question is :

I read somewhere that if you're lapping one surface , might as well lap both , else skip it ..
Wondering if my heatsink will need the lapping .. there's a difference to diminishing results when it comes to needs and requires.

Thanks!
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