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[TR] Physicists Recreate End Of Time. - Page 9

post #81 of 200
Someone needs to cut the matrix ability down to insert new skills/knowledge without prior knowledge to get to that knowledge in the first place. If that is possible than I can just insert a skill without any work. Who wants' that?
post #82 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timlander View Post
Yea it is crazy and I understand fully what you are saying. I am just saying maybe it does not work quite that way we believe it does. Just saying my belief or theory on that principle is what you see in the universe is what is happening at that moment. On the flip side of my original post, there is another theory about light. Many theories state that the closer to the speed of light that you travel, the more time will dilate. Which means say an object is traveling at 0.8 of the speed of light, time for that object will pass by the same. However, time for everything outside of that object and speed passes by much faster in comparison. This is all based on theories of course. But my assumption from this is: it's possibly that traveling at the speed of light, time has not moved for you, but for the rest of the universe it has. So what this could mean is it takes light time to travel based on our observation of it. However, for that light particle, perhaps no time at all has passed for it. Thus showing us what is happening right now from wherever that particle came from. It's a bit hard to put into words, IDK if i came out clear as to what I was trying to portray here or not.

I fully get what you are saying. The light, likely does travel great distances in <pun> no time at all </pun> ha ha... I'm not funny, I know....

Time dilation makes $#it SUPER complicated.
Still though, you are mistaking 'now' with 'now right here'. If light bounces off an apple, and flies off into space, that light won't percieve any length of time, but the wavelength of that light will remain fixed to what it was when it left the apple's surface. So that years later, for the apple, and lightyears later for the light, as it will be happily floating along percieving 'no time' only distance, will still have the same wavelength as was caused by the apple as it was. So that at its destination, where some other being percieves that light, it will see the shiny red apple. The apple though, will have aged and rotted away. Once the apple and the light part physically, they have no way to interact with each other. The rotting apple can no longer affect the wavelength of the light that has already left.

Light from point A to point B, B sees what is 'now' in A's past. That 'now' being the 'now' for the apple/ point A. That's easy.

Time dilation can be used to move 'forward in time', by moving an object with mass, like a person who would percieve the trip (which that gets all sorts of whacky).
If I left point A at 99% the speed of light, and came to rest at point B, and turned around, I would still not be able to see the 'past'. I would have traveled a great distance, that for me maybe was only a few seconds. But what happens back at point A is they would not see me arive for another few mins/hours/years depending on how far I went. Thats some trippy stuff right there...
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post #83 of 200
How can you recreate something without it first existing?

"Scientist made something that they are unsure of" would be more accurate
    
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post #84 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOP View Post
I fully get what you are saying. The light, likely does travel great distances in <pun> no time at all </pun> ha ha... I'm not funny, I know....

Time dilation makes $#it SUPER complicated.
Still though, you are mistaking 'now' with 'now right here'. If light bounces off an apple, and flies off into space, that light won't percieve any length of time, but the wavelength of that light will remain fixed to what it was when it left the apple's surface. So that years later, for the apple, and lightyears later for the light, as it will be happily floating along percieving 'no time' only distance, will still have the same wavelength as was caused by the apple as it was. So that at its destination, where some other being percieves that light, it will see the shiny red apple. The apple though, will have aged and rotted away. Once the apple and the light part physically, they have no way to interact with each other. The rotting apple can no longer affect the wavelength of the light that has already left.

Light from point A to point B, B sees what is 'now' in A's past. That 'now' being the 'now' for the apple/ point A. That's easy.

Time dilation can be used to move 'forward in time', by moving an object with mass, like a person who would percieve the trip (which that gets all sorts of whacky).
If I left point A at 99% the speed of light, and came to rest at point B, and turned around, I would still not be able to see the 'past'. I would have traveled a great distance, that for me maybe was only a few seconds. But what happens back at point A is they would not see me arive for another few mins/hours/years depending on how far I went. Thats some trippy stuff right there...
I like discussions like this. Thanks. And you are right stuff like this is complicated.
post #85 of 200
I am curious about the posts regarding the nature of time passage and it's relation to the "speed of light". Can someone here please explain to me what is the "speed of light" and what exactly it's relation to time is?
    
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post #86 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by frickfrock99 View Post
Well... data and statistics can be just as easily manipulated as experiences and sensations.
Data can be replicated and defined.
Statistics can be recalculated and proven.

Experiences and sensations are personal and therefore are not reproducable, not objective, and not measurable. Therefore, knowledge based solely on experiences and sensations are not science by definition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frickfrock99 View Post
Of course.
One of my favorite Plato quotes is, "A good decision is based on knowledge , not numbers".
Wise words.
If you really want to drag philosophy into it.... read Aristole.
There is no scientific knowledge of the individual.
There is a starting point for all reasoning that can be traced back.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOP View Post
Still though, you are mistaking 'now' with 'now right here'. If light bounces off an apple, and flies off into space, that light won't percieve any length of time, but the wavelength of that light will remain fixed to what it was when it left the apple's surface. So that years later, for the apple, and lightyears later for the light, as it will be happily floating along percieving 'no time' only distance, will still have the same wavelength as was caused by the apple as it was. So that at its destination, where some other being percieves that light, it will see the shiny red apple. The apple though, will have aged and rotted away. Once the apple and the light part physically, they have no way to interact with each other. The rotting apple can no longer affect the wavelength of the light that has already left.
Wavelengths do change.

Look at an apple under water at an angle (Refraction).
Watch an apple as it is thrown (Doppler Effect).

Edited by DuckieHo - 7/26/11 at 10:06am
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post #87 of 200
[quote=Jagged_Steel;14351268]Quote:
Originally Posted by Jagged_Steel
Quote:
=Blameless;14351151]The fact that tomorrow is not yesterday is something of a clue.

QUOTE]

This is by no means a fact. It is an assumption. Again: Where is one shred of proof of this?
It is said that time is what keeps everything from happening at once. The fact that even recreated actions are not the original event distinguishes moments of time from one and other. Time is linear. It depends on whether points in time can be folded onto one and other like points in space as to whether time can be traveled as far as my understanding of it goes.
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post #88 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOP View Post
I fully get what you are saying. The light, likely does travel great distances in <pun> no time at all </pun> ha ha... I'm not funny, I know....

Time dilation makes $#it SUPER complicated.
Still though, you are mistaking 'now' with 'now right here'. If light bounces off an apple, and flies off into space, that light won't percieve any length of time, but the wavelength of that light will remain fixed to what it was when it left the apple's surface. So that years later, for the apple, and lightyears later for the light, as it will be happily floating along percieving 'no time' only distance, will still have the same wavelength as was caused by the apple as it was. So that at its destination, where some other being percieves that light, it will see the shiny red apple. The apple though, will have aged and rotted away. Once the apple and the light part physically, they have no way to interact with each other. The rotting apple can no longer affect the wavelength of the light that has already left.

Light from point A to point B, B sees what is 'now' in A's past. That 'now' being the 'now' for the apple/ point A. That's easy.

Time dilation can be used to move 'forward in time', by moving an object with mass, like a person who would percieve the trip (which that gets all sorts of whacky).
If I left point A at 99% the speed of light, and came to rest at point B, and turned around, I would still not be able to see the 'past'. I would have traveled a great distance, that for me maybe was only a few seconds. But what happens back at point A is they would not see me arive for another few mins/hours/years depending on how far I went. Thats some trippy stuff right there...
Special relativity.
post #89 of 200
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Data can be replicated and defined.
Statistics can be recalculated and proven.

Experiences and sensations are personal and therefore are not reproducable, not objective, and not measurable.
Hold on... if experiences and sensations are not reproducable, then what are drawings, movies, and other forms of expression? I can easily describe what happens in front of me during any given time, assuming all my wits are about me.
Aren't those produced, defined, and proven constantly?

Are you saying that the existence of the experience itself can't be proven tangibly or the experience can't be replicated?
post #90 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jagged_Steel View Post
I am curious about the posts regarding the nature of time passage and it's relation to the "speed of light". Can someone here please explain to me what is the "speed of light" and what exactly it's relation to time is?
The speed of light = 299,792,458 m/s

Your 2nd question would pertain to the theory of relativity and its not as simple as just quoting what Einstein said.
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