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[FSB] NASA begins landing tests of future space vehicles - Page 3

post #21 of 37
why dont they just use the gravity well (hover) technology reverse engineered from UFOs. Im sure there are a few just laying around.
    
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post #22 of 37
wow so instead of landing is going for a dive lol
 
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post #23 of 37
This is great to see!! I have read this whole thread and won't comment on some the things said here because it isn't worth my time or energy. I hope NASA gets more funding soon so we can continue!
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post #24 of 37
Not to derail the off-topic debate.

When I actually looked at the pictures and video in the article, the pool itself is not that large and it appears that most of the money spent was for the large scaffolding and sensor equipment. Trying to do that in the ocean (with boats, platforms, or whatever you decide to use), would be considerably more expensive to not only build but to include all the safety designs that would be necessary in a sea-based testing site.

The location itself does not seem to add much to the cost and the support equipment is more important (and expensive).
     
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post #25 of 37
A single, medium-sized metallic asteroid with a mass of around 10^17 kg, if composed of pure iron (it isn't--metallic asteroids also contain much more valuable materials such as nickel, magnesium, gold, platinum, palladium, titanium, ruthenium, silver, uranium, chromium, rhodium, etc. Keep in mind, the vast majority of metals in Earth's crust were delivered by asteroid impacts, after the planet's surface solidified) would have a gross value (assuming the price of raw iron ore is $4/kg) of approximately $4 quadrillion US dollars (that's four million billion dollars). Of course this would flood the market with metal and drive the price of iron and other metals down to nearly nothing. The value would still be in the hundreds of billions or even trillions. A single asteroid, put into low Earth orbit and systematically mined, could pay for NASA's entire combined and cumulative cost throughout its entire existence, several hundred times over.

This would make building materials much cheaper, making housing more affordable. Manufacturing metal items would be much cheaper, leading to more availability of high technology in developing areas. With a surplus of metal there would be little to no need to strip mine our own planet, leading to a cleaner environment and more preservation of natural beauty.


Consider also the possibility of orbiting solar farms, that can face the sun 14 hours out of every day (or more, or variably more and less, depending on orbit). The energy could then be beamed down to anyplace on earth by microwave laser to a collecting station. This would be about five times more efficient than terrestrial based solar panels, infinitely cleaner than fossil fuels, and without the risks of nuclear power.





Claiming that space exploration is worthless is one of the stupidest things a person can say.
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
A single, medium-sized metallic asteroid with a mass of around 10^17 kg, if composed of pure iron (it isn't--metallic asteroids also contain much more valuable materials such as nickel, magnesium, gold, platinum, palladium, titanium, ruthenium, silver, uranium, chromium, rhodium, etc. Keep in mind, the vast majority of metals in Earth's crust were delivered by asteroid impacts, after the planet's surface solidified) would have a gross value (assuming the price of raw iron ore is $4/kg) of approximately $4 quadrillion US dollars (that's four million billion dollars). Of course this would flood the market with metal and drive the price of iron and other metals down to nearly nothing. The value would still be in the hundreds of billions or even trillions. A single asteroid, put into low Earth orbit and systematically mined, could pay for NASA's entire combined and cumulative cost throughout its entire existence, several hundred times over.

This would make building materials much cheaper, making housing more affordable. Manufacturing metal items would be much cheaper, leading to more availability of high technology in developing areas. With a surplus of metal there would be little to no need to strip mine our own planet, leading to a cleaner environment and more preservation of natural beauty.


Consider also the possibility of orbiting solar farms, that can face the sun 14 hours out of every day (or more, or variably more and less, depending on orbit). The energy could then be beamed down to anyplace on earth by microwave laser to a collecting station. This would be about five times more efficient than terrestrial based solar panels, infinitely cleaner than fossil fuels, and without the risks of nuclear power.





Claiming that space exploration is worthless is one of the stupidest things a person can say.

If I could REP you I would many times!! This is so true and more!! Thanks!
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post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
A single, medium-sized metallic asteroid with a mass of around 10^17 kg, if composed of pure iron (it isn't--metallic asteroids also contain much more valuable materials such as nickel, magnesium, gold, platinum, palladium, titanium, ruthenium, silver, uranium, chromium, rhodium, etc. Keep in mind, the vast majority of metals in Earth's crust were delivered by asteroid impacts, after the planet's surface solidified) would have a gross value (assuming the price of raw iron ore is $4/kg) of approximately $4 quadrillion US dollars (that's four million billion dollars). Of course this would flood the market with metal and drive the price of iron and other metals down to nearly nothing. The value would still be in the hundreds of billions or even trillions. A single asteroid, put into low Earth orbit and systematically mined, could pay for NASA's entire combined and cumulative cost throughout its entire existence, several hundred times over.

This would make building materials much cheaper, making housing more affordable. Manufacturing metal items would be much cheaper, leading to more availability of high technology in developing areas. With a surplus of metal there would be little to no need to strip mine our own planet, leading to a cleaner environment and more preservation of natural beauty.


Consider also the possibility of orbiting solar farms, that can face the sun 14 hours out of every day (or more, or variably more and less, depending on orbit). The energy could then be beamed down to anyplace on earth by microwave laser to a collecting station. This would be about five times more efficient than terrestrial based solar panels, infinitely cleaner than fossil fuels, and without the risks of nuclear power.





Claiming that space exploration is worthless is one of the stupidest things a person can say.
Why did you (I presume it was you) delete a large majority of the posts that were off topic about how space exploration is important, one of which had a very good argument (I think so at least) but then leave your own? Seems rather double standards ish, no?

Anyways, as I have posted earlier.
This is fantastic news, and I hope that it does go well. I think that if NASA were to have some good PR company at their disposal, this would be filled with money from people.
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post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by hak8or View Post
Why did you (I presume it was you) delete a large majority of the posts that were off topic about how space exploration is important, one of which had a very good argument (I think so at least) but then leave your own? Seems rather double standards ish, no?
You've got the wrong guy. I don't have mod powers in this section. Must have been someone else.
post #29 of 37
Was me, actually. I was considering clearing that post as part of my work in here but decided not to.
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post #30 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunky_Chimp View Post
Was me, actually. I was considering clearing that post as part of my work in here but decided not to.
Good man, I enjoyed reading that post lol
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