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Enabling RDP over IP?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have a computer at home that I would like to have the ability to access from my work computer.

I access this computer at home using RDP and our private IPs.

I don't know the username and password of the router web browser so I will have to reset it. Here's a link to my router: http://www22.verizon.com/Residential...sOne/85953.htm

Once I can log in, what should I do to make it available over my work computer? Will it take long? I wanted to get it set up at lunch today (~15 minutes). Any tips or advice?

How would I go about doing this?
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post
I have a computer at home that I would like to have the ability to access from my work computer.

I access this computer at home using RDP and our private IPs.

I don't know the username and password of the router web browser so I will have to reset it. Here's a link to my router: http://www22.verizon.com/Residential...sOne/85953.htm

Once I can log in, what should I do to make it available over my work computer? Will it take long? I wanted to get it set up at lunch today (~15 minutes). Any tips or advice?

How would I go about doing this?
Make sure your home computer is assigned a static IP or a DHCP reservation, and then port forward 3389 to that IP address.

Alternatively, you can NAT any external port number as long as you use internal 3389 to that IP address of the computer.
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post #3 of 26
1) route port 3389 towards your pc on the router
2) use a dyndns tool on your pc in case you have a dynamic IP adress from your provider
3) connect to the dyndns domain:3389
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help but I'm still a bit confused!

First, there are a couple of computers on the network that share the same IP. For example, my PC shares the same public IP with my Dad's laptop - it is the internal IP that's different. How do I make it so I can connect to the right computer if they're both using the same IP?

Second, should I give myself a static IP (does this make me more vulnerable securitywise?) or should I leave it dynamic and use the dyndns tool? Is this something that I download or built into the router's web software?

Sorry, I'm trying to figure out the exact steps I am going to follow. Any extra help would be really appreciated.
post #5 of 26
I assume your FIOS IP address is dynamic and not static. Make a free DynDNS account.

Then log into your FIOS router. Click Advanced -> Dynamic DNS. Enter in your information. There are ports you may need open up with port forwarding. The FIOS router should automatically port forward for you with UPnP.

It might be easier just to use LogMeIn.
Edited by Riou - 7/29/11 at 11:28am
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post
I assume your FIOS IP address is dynamic and not static. Make a free DynDNS account.

Then log into your FIOS router. Click Advanced -> Dynamic DNS. Enter in your information. There are ports you may need open up with port forwarding. The FIOS router should automatically port forward for you with UPnP.

Then under Remote Desktop connection, enter in the address of the computer you want to connect to.

It might be easier just to use LogMeIn.
It probably is a lot easier to use LogMeIn, but I don't want to install anything on either computer (especially at work), and I would really like to use built in tools.

What's the advantage of dynamic of static? Why don't I just make it static?
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post
It probably is a lot easier to use LogMeIn, but I don't want to install anything on either computer (especially at work), and I would really like to use built in tools.

What's the advantage of dynamic of static? Why don't I just make it static?
My FIOS account only has a dynamic IP address. Dynamic IP addresses may change IP addresses. For example, one week it would be 123.45.6.7. The next week it could be 123.45.9.100.

Most residential ISP plans only give you dynamic IP addresses not static IP's. This is bad if you are hosting something over the Internet. If the IP address changes, you cannot access the server from the Internet.

Businesses pay for static IP addresses so they can host servers without any worry.

Services like DynDNS monitor your dynamic IP address. If it changes, they will update it. In your router, you just enter in your hostname (i.e. riou.dyndns.org) so you can still access it even if your router's IP address changes.
Edited by Riou - 7/29/11 at 6:49am
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post
Thanks for the help but I'm still a bit confused!

First, there are a couple of computers on the network that share the same IP. For example, my PC shares the same public IP with my Dad's laptop - it is the internal IP that's different. How do I make it so I can connect to the right computer if they're both using the same IP?

Second, should I give myself a static IP (does this make me more vulnerable securitywise?) or should I leave it dynamic and use the dyndns tool? Is this something that I download or built into the router's web software?

Sorry, I'm trying to figure out the exact steps I am going to follow. Any extra help would be really appreciated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post
It probably is a lot easier to use LogMeIn, but I don't want to install anything on either computer (especially at work), and I would really like to use built in tools.

What's the advantage of dynamic of static? Why don't I just make it static?
All of your computers will share the same external IP address, that's a given.

As you said, your computers obviously have different internal IP addresses.

When you forward port 3389 to a specific IP address, that's how the request is differentiated. If you want to be able to access multiple computers using RDP, the easiest way is to use Network Address Translation (NAT).

For example, in your router, you would configure:

External port 3389 > Internal Port 3389 > Dad's laptop IP address
External port 3390 > Internal Port 3389 > Mom's laptop IP address
External port 3391 > Internal Port 3389 > Your desktop IP address

When you connect using the RDP client, if you wanted to connect to your desktop, you would use:

RDP > [External IP Address]:3391

i.e. 208.67.222.222:3391

Your router will handle the rest.

Also, you seem confused between static and dynamic IP address in on the LAN (internal) vs WAN (external).

About Dynamic DNS (Copied from dyndns.org):
How does Dynamic DNS work?

Most residental internet connections use a dynamic IP address, which changes weekly or daily. This prevents visitors from easily finding their networks. The Dynamic DNS and Dyn Standard DNS services fix this problem by giving you a human-readable hostname, such as yoursite.dyndns.org or yourdomain.com, which is updated automatically with your IP with a special update client. This allows visitors to reach your home network without needing to know the IP address ahead of time.


=====

With regards to your internal IP address, you should use static IP addresses because you're relying on that IP address to not change - you've set specific IP addresses in your router for port-forwarding. If you have a power outage, your router can lose the DHCP table it had previously and assign new IP addresses to each of your computers, thereby rendering your previously-configured port-forwards completely useless.
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post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ComGuards View Post
All of your computers will share the same external IP address, that's a given.

As you said, your computers obviously have different internal IP addresses.

When you forward port 3389 to a specific IP address, that's how the request is differentiated. If you want to be able to access multiple computers using RDP, the easiest way is to use Network Address Translation (NAT).

For example, in your router, you would configure:

External port 3389 > Internal Port 3389 > Dad's laptop IP address
External port 3390 > Internal Port 3389 > Mom's laptop IP address
External port 3391 > Internal Port 3389 > Your desktop IP address

When you connect using the RDP client, if you wanted to connect to your desktop, you would use:

RDP > [External IP Address]:3391

i.e. 208.67.222.222:3391

Your router will handle the rest.

Also, you seem confused between static and dynamic IP address in on the LAN (internal) vs WAN (external).

About Dynamic DNS (Copied from dyndns.org):
How does Dynamic DNS work?

Most residental internet connections use a dynamic IP address, which changes weekly or daily. This prevents visitors from easily finding their networks. The Dynamic DNS and Dyn Standard DNS services fix this problem by giving you a human-readable hostname, such as yoursite.dyndns.org or yourdomain.com, which is updated automatically with your IP with a special update client. This allows visitors to reach your home network without needing to know the IP address ahead of time.


=====

With regards to your internal IP address, you should use static IP addresses because you're relying on that IP address to not change - you've set specific IP addresses in your router for port-forwarding. If you have a power outage, your router can lose the DHCP table it had previously and assign new IP addresses to each of your computers, thereby rendering your previously-configured port-forwards completely useless.
Great explanation. +Rep for that (EDIT: if I could, lol).

If you want to answer some more questions, I certainly have a couple.

So it does not matter what I make the external port, as long as the internal port is 3389 for the RDP? I can make the external ports 100, 200, and 300 if I wanted to - or do they need to be in the range of 339x?

I do not need to use DynDNS as I will just enter the IP manually. Is this okay or am I missing the true concept of DynDNS?

Static and Dynamic IP addresses apply to both public and private IPs? So if it's dynamic and the router shuts off (which does happen frequently), both my internal (192.168.1.3) and external IP will be possibly changed?
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post
I do not need to use DynDNS as I will just enter the IP manually. Is this okay or am I missing the true concept of DynDNS?
DynDNS is for when your external IP address changes like I said in my prior post.

Lets say your external IP address is 1.1.1.1. I am trying to connect to your server and it works. Then a week later, your ISP changes your external IP address to 2.2.2.2. I cannot access your server because I still think you are on 1.1.1.1.

DynDNS keeps track of this external IP address change. Instead of me trying to connect to 1.1.1.1, you make a hostname called myserver.dyndns.org. I use myserver.dyndns.org to connect to you instead.

Now when your external IP address changes, myserver.dyndns.org will go to 2.2.2.2 instead of 1.1.1.1 like before.
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