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Overclocking i5 750 stability issues

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone,

Just want to say thanks for all the great information on this site, I would be lost without it.

I'll just come out and say it, this will be the first computer I've tried to overclock, and as a matter of fact, when I bought this PC, I didn't even realize the i5 750 could achieve such speeds. Any help on this would be amazing, you have no idea.

Here are the specs for my computer :

SiSoftware Sandra
Computer
Model : Si MSI P55-CD53 Desktop
Processor
Model : Intel(R) Core(TM) i5 CPU 750 @ 2.67GHz
Speed : 4GHz
Cores per Processor : 4 Unit(s)
Type : Quad-Core
Integrated Data Cache : 2x 32kB, Synchronous, Write-Thru, 8-way, 64 byte line size, 2 threads sharing
L2 Cache : 2x 256kB, ECC, Synchronous, ATC, 8-way, 64 byte line size, 2 threads sharing
L3 Cache : 8MB, ECC, Synchronous, ATC, 16-way, Exclusive, 64 byte line size, 16 threads sharing

Computer
Mainboard : MSI P55-CD53 (MS-7586)
BIOS : AMI (OEM) V1.1B5 08/28/2009
Bus(es) : ISA X-Bus PCI PCIe IMB USB i2c/SMBus
Multi-Processor (MP) Support : No
Multi-Processor Advanced PIC (APIC) : Yes
Total Memory : 8GB DIMM DDR3

Chipset
Model : MSI Core (Clarksfield/Lynnfield) DMI
Front Side Bus Speed : 2x 3.62GHz (7.24GHz)

Chipset
Model : Intel Core Desktop (Lynnfield) UnCore
Front Side Bus Speed : 2x 3.62GHz (7.24GHz)
Total Memory : 8GB DIMM DDR3
Channels : 2
Memory Bus Speed : 2x 804MHz (1.6GHz)

Memory Module(s)
Memory Module : Micron 16JTF25664AZ-1G4F1 2GB DIMM DDR3 PC3-10700U DDR3-1334 (10-10-10-27 5-37-11-6)
Memory Module : Kingston 9905403-173A00LF 2GB DIMM DDR3 PC3-10700U DDR3-1334 (9-9-9-25 4-34-10-5)
Memory Module : Micron 16JTF25664AZ-1G4F1 2GB DIMM DDR3 PC3-10700U DDR3-1334 (10-10-10-27 5-37-11-6)
Memory Module : Kingston 9905403-173A00LF 2GB DIMM DDR3 PC3-10700U DDR3-1334 (9-9-9-25 4-34-10-5)

Video System
Video Adapter : AMD Radeon HD 6800 Series (1120 SM5.0 950MHz, 1GB DDR5 4.2GHz 256-bit, PCIe 2.00 x16)

Graphics Processor
OpenCL GP Processor : AMD Radeon HD 6800 Series (1120SP 14C 950MHz, 832MB DDR5 4.2GHz 256-bit)
Compute Shader Processor : AMD Radeon HD 6800 Series (1120SP 950MHz, 1GB DDR5 4.2GHz 256-bit)
STREAM GP Processor : AMD Radeon HD 6800 Series (2SP 14C 950MHz, 1GB DDR5 4.2GHz 256-bit)

Storage Devices
WDC WD6400AAKS-55A7B0 (640.1GB, SATA300, 3.5", 7200rpm, 16MB Cache) : 596GB (D
OCZ-AGILITY2 (60GB, SATA300, SSD) : 56GB (C
Apple iPod 4GB (USB) : 4GB (K
Generic USB SD Reader (USB) : N/A (G
Generic USB CF Reader (USB) : N/A (H
Generic USB xD/SM Reader (USB) : N/A (I
Generic USB MS Reader (USB) : N/A (J
USB Flash Memory 4GB (USB) : 4GB (F
HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH22NS50 (SATA150, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache) : N/A (E

Logical Storage Devices
System Reserved : 100MB (NTFS)
Hard Disk (C : 56GB (NTFS) @ OCZ-AGILITY2 (60GB, SATA300, SSD)
Removable Drive (K : 4GB (FAT32) @ Apple iPod 4GB (USB)
Removable Drive (F : 4GB (FAT32) @ USB Flash Memory 4GB (USB)
Hard Disk (D : 596GB (NTFS) @ WDC WD6400AAKS-55A7B0 (640.1GB, SATA300, 3.5", 7200rpm, 16MB Cache)
Removable Drive (G : N/A @ Generic USB SD Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (H : N/A @ Generic USB CF Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (I : N/A @ Generic USB xD/SM Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (J : N/A @ Generic USB MS Reader (USB)
Optical Drive (E : N/A @ HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH22NS50 (SATA150, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache)

Peripherals
LPC Hub Controller 1 : MSI P55 LPC Interface Controller
LPC Legacy Controller 1 : T0 07-23
Audio Device : MSI P55/PM55/3400 High Definition Audio
Audio Codec : Realtek Semi High Definition Audio
Audio Device : Pine Technology Radeon 68xx HDMI Audio (NI Barts)
Audio Codec : ATI (AMD) HDMI Audio
Serial Port(s) : 1
Parallel Port(s) : 1
Disk Controller : MSI P55/PM55/3400 4 port SATA IDE Controller
Disk Controller : MSI P55/PM55/3400 2 port SATA IDE Controller
Disk Controller : MSI JMB36X PCIE-to-SATAII/IDE RAID Controller
USB Controller 1 : MSI P55/PM55/3400 USB2 Enhanced Host Controller
USB Controller 2 : MSI P55/PM55/3400 USB2 Enhanced Host Controller
SMBus/i2c Controller 1 : Intel ICH SMBus

Network Services
Network Adapter : Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (Ethernet, 100Mbps)

Power Management
Mains (AC) Line Status : On-Line

Operating System
Windows System : Microsoft Windows 7 Home 6.01.7601 (Service Pack 1)
Platform Compliance : x64

Windows Experience Index
Current System : 7.3


I currently am trying to achieve a 3.6ghz CPU speed using an i5 750 on an MSI P55 CD53 board. The processor is cooled by the coolermaster heatsink 215, which does a great job keeping the temp down, however getting a stable OC seems like an insurmountable issue. It seems like every guide I read about overclocking provides values that I simply cannot modify using my current Bios. A perfect example is that MSI doesn't allow absolute values for Vcore, instead, it's relative and not in real time. I am also not seeing certain values for QPI, or PLL. I provided a link for a page that shows each page with their respective values. Ultimately, what I am asking for, is for someone to look at those screen shots, tell me what values I would need to put into my Bios, that would satisfy this benchmark :

3.6GHz24hrs Small FFTs test, 30hrs-2mins Large FFTs test and 14hrs-12mins Memtest86+ stable!)
Load-Line Calibration: Enabled (or Level2 for Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD5)
Vcore= 1.20V (CPU-Z idle)
QPI/Vtt/IMC= 1.14V
PCH= 1.10V
PLL= 1.80V
RAM= Specified voltage for your RAM

Here is the link for the website - http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/c [...] e-i5-750/6

I really appreciate anyone's help on this,

Thanks,
Sean.
post #2 of 9
Quote:
WDC WD6400AAKS-55A7B0 (640.1GB, SATA300, 3.5", 7200rpm, 16MB Cache) : 596GB (D
OCZ-AGILITY2 (60GB, SATA300, SSD) : 56GB (C
Apple iPod 4GB (USB) : 4GB (K
Generic USB SD Reader (USB) : N/A (G
Generic USB CF Reader (USB) : N/A (H
Generic USB xD/SM Reader (USB) : N/A (I
Generic USB MS Reader (USB) : N/A (J
USB Flash Memory 4GB (USB) : 4GB (F
HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH22NS50 (SATA150, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache) : N/A (E

Logical Storage Devices
System Reserved : 100MB (NTFS)
Hard Disk (C : 56GB (NTFS) @ OCZ-AGILITY2 (60GB, SATA300, SSD)
Removable Drive (K : 4GB (FAT32) @ Apple iPod 4GB (USB)
Removable Drive (F : 4GB (FAT32) @ USB Flash Memory 4GB (USB)
Hard Disk (D : 596GB (NTFS) @ WDC WD6400AAKS-55A7B0 (640.1GB, SATA300, 3.5", 7200rpm, 16MB Cache)
Removable Drive (G : N/A @ Generic USB SD Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (H : N/A @ Generic USB CF Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (I : N/A @ Generic USB xD/SM Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (J : N/A @ Generic USB MS Reader (USB)
Optical Drive (E : N/A @ HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH22NS50 (SATA150, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache)
lol the drives got turned into smileys
im no pro on SB chips (or even Intel altogether) but whenever i have stability issues i increase vcore little by little until i see improvment; if i see no improvement after a few increases i go and start lower and lifting other things (ea. HTS and such)
if you can't touch very many things on the CPU i recommend flashing your BIOS so you can get a little more tribal on its a**
post #3 of 9
yeah just increase vcore more ...
I also have one of those bad chips that cant do 3600 at 1.2v
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antec mini
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post #4 of 9
What are your load temps at?
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
CPUID shows all cores fluctuating at around 50-54 C under blended P95 test.
post #6 of 9
Ahoy there!

I've got a pretty similar setup so hopefully I'll be able to help you out. First and foremost, not all chips are created equally. Some chips are able to clock higher or run cooler than others. This is just part of the CPU binning process. With that being said, I believe we will be able to fine tune your overclock with just the right amount of work. With the Lynnfield family of CPU's, especially the i5 750 and the i7 860, the memory controller is integrated into the CPU itself so overclocking is made relatively easy. Before we make any actual changes in the bios, there are a couple of items you need to familiarize yourself with - Vcore, VTT and PLL.

Vcore, is defined as the amount of voltage supplied to the chip in order to keep it running at a stable state. As you increase the core frequency from its stock speeds, the vcore will need to be adjusted accordingly in order to maintain stability. Last time I checked, Intel stated that you should not exceed 1.4v for Lynnfield CPU's. Of course, if you have pretty good cooling, you can exceed that 1.4v mark all the while maintaining perfectly safe temps. The important thing to grasp is here is that as you increase the vcore, your CPU temps will increase vastly, so always keep your temps in check when you are fine tuning your overclock. For Intel chips, it is recommended not to exceed 85c. I believe the chip will start to throttle itself when nearing 90c.

VTT, commonly referred to as QPI or IMC in some Asus and Gigabyte P55 motherboards, is the amount of voltage supplied to the CPU's integrated memory controller. Like Vcore, this will need to be adjusted at some point in time. As more of the memory slots on the motherboard are filled up, the stress on the memory controller is greatly increased, thus you will to increase the voltage in order to maintain stability. The following is well known - when overclocking with two sticks of ram, it is actually a lot easier than overclocking with say four sticks of ram (eg - 2x4GB vs 4x2GB). This is due to the fact that there is less stress on the CPU's integrated memory controller. Overclocking with more than two sticks of ram is certainly attainable, but you will have to run at a higher VTT voltage as apposed to if you are just running with two sticks of ram.

PLL, is simply defined as the amount of voltage needed to stabilize the CPU when you are running at higher frequencies (ex - 4.0GHz +). You may or may not have to increase this.

With the above information in hand, let's dive into the actually overclocking process. By default, your i5 750 runs at a frequency of 2660mhz - base clock (BCLK) of 133 and a CPU multiplier of 20x (133*20 = 2660). At stock clocks, if you open up CPUz, you might get slightly different results and this is perfectly normal as it is related to Intel's turbo boost technology. In a nutshell, what Intel's turbo boost does is that it temporary increases the frequency of one of the cores when you are working with a multi-threaded application. Of course, there are ways of overclocking with turbo boost left on (which in some cases can be much easier or much more difficult for some people), but for the sake of simplicity we will be turning it off. Since we both have similar motherboards, I imagine the bioses (is this even a word?) are of much similarity. I've attached several pictures to the bottom of this post in case you wanted to compare settings. Before we can actually begin overclocking, we want to make sure that all power-saving functions are disabled. With the power saving functions enabled, your cpu speed will constantly throttle down itself to safe power. To ensure that your CPU is running at a constant speed, we will need to turn them off. In your bios, you need to look for the following power saving functions and turn them off -

Intel EIST [off]
Intel C-State [off]
C1E Support [off]
OverSpeed Protection [off]

(AFAIK, disabling the above will automatically disable turbo boost as well)

In my motherboard, all of these options were found under Cell menu -> CPU features.

Once we have these options turned off, we can begin to dial in the rest of the settings. Next,
head on over back into the cell menu and change the following. For "Adjust CPU Base Frequency
(Mhz)", this is where you enter in your base clock. Default for your CPU is 133 so we need to
increase it to 180 or so (180*20 = 3600mhz). Right below that, you should see something that says adjust CPU ratio. The i5 750 has a max multi of 20x (with turbo boost disabled), so you shouldn't need to change this. Right below this, you should see some memory adjusting features. Since you are running two different pairs of memory modules, you'll want them running at relatively same frequencies. Since both sets of ram have a default frequency of 1333mhz, the only thing we really need to change are the ram frequencies. Leave XMP disabled and head on over to "Extreme Memory Profile". This is where we are able to change the ram timings. Since we have a pretty modest overclock, try running all four sticks at 9-9-9-27. These timings are pretty "loose" so you should not have any problems.

Once you have these settings dialed in, head on back over into the cell menu. Your next step is to adjust the memory ratio - this corresponds with the frequency of your overclock. You should be given several options - 4x, 6x, 8x, etc., For now, stick to 4x. Your memory should now be running at 1300-1400mhz. Right below Memory Ratio, you should see an option for QPI Ratio. You'll want this at the lowest ratio - in my case it would be 16x.

Almost done. Double check and make sure you have everything dialed in so far. The last thing we need to change are the voltages (oh boy!) Head back into cell menu and enter in the following:

CPU voltage (vcore) : ~1.30v
CPU VTT (V): ~1.35v
CPU PLL Voltage (V): ~1.81v
DRAM Voltage (V) : ~1.65v
Spread spectrum: disabled

You should also see an option for load line calibration (aka vdroop control). This is for the more advanced user, so for now let's just leave it alone.

Once you have these settings dialed in, you should be all set. Press F10 to save and then reboot back into Windows. If for some reason your system refuses to boot or Windows freezes, you will need to increase the Vcore and/or VTT voltage. Remember, you shouldn't needed to exceed 1.4v for both.

As for testing the stability of your overclock, I recommend running a 1 hour run of Prime small FFT. If it passes without any errors, run an additional 8-12 hours of Prime 95 blend. Some people recommending running a 24 hour of Prime which I think it is highly overkill. If your system passes without any further errors, you have the option of restarting the same test testing procedure while lowering the Vcore or VTT voltage down a notch or too. Hope this helps.

Main menu:

Cell Menu:

CPU features:

Cell menu continued:

Cell menu continued:

Edited by NitrousX - 8/1/11 at 5:27pm
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Destructor
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
That was actually exactly what the issue was - I had two different timing modes for the memory modules. I tried to fix this issue as you stated, and i had a partially good stress test. I started wondering if I really needed the extra 4gb, and decided to just pull the microns, and down the line i'll just by the same kingston ram.

After pulling out the microns, i was able to get a stable oc at 3.6ghz using stock voltage, so I'm pretty happy with that.

My question now is: is there a major difference in performance between 3.6 and 4ghz?
Edited by navras7 - 8/1/11 at 5:07pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by navras7 View Post
That was actually exactly what the issue was - I had two different timing modes for the memory modules. I tried to fix this issue as you stated, and i had a partially good stress test. I started wondering if I really needed the extra 4gb, and decided to just pull the microns, and down the line i'll just by the same kingston ram.

After pulling out the microns, i was able to get a stable oc at 3.6ghz using stock voltage, so I'm pretty happy with that.

My question now is: is there a major difference in performance between 3.6 and 4ghz?
You won't notice a significant difference in real world applications. I personally would sell both sets of ram and get a 2x4GB kit. RAM is pretty cheap these days...
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post #9 of 9
Yeah< I found my Corsair XMS3 DDR3 RAM is pretty solid, and keeps cool too
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Triggers broom
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