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Primary OS SSD - what speeds really matter?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
So I've noticed there are a lot of different benchmarks for SSDs on different ways that it can read and write.

So, which is most important being an OS drive with photoshop, skype, word, excel, and normal internet usage?

This is for a netbook if it matters, it will only function as program drive and OS drive with a 500gb external for music and photos and stuffs.

In particular, I was looking at the following drives: (any other recommendations?)
Crucial M4
Corsair Nova Series 2

Thanks,
SI
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post #2 of 5
The major benefit of a SSD is the near-instant access times. So, when you click to open a program, the SSD can access it directly instead of performing a seek as a platter drive would. Same goes for writes. Specs like sequential read and write speed really aren't as important, especially on a relatively simple machine like a netbook.

Almost any modern drive should provide comparable performance. That being said, Crucial's drives are a solid option.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by t-ramp View Post
The major benefit of a SSD is the near-instant access times. So, when you click to open a program, the SSD can access it directly instead of performing a seek as a platter drive would. Same goes for writes. Specs like sequential read and write speed really aren't as important, especially on a relatively simple machine like a netbook.

Almost any modern drive should provide comparable performance. That being said, Crucial's drives are a solid option.
So that low write speed of the Crucial won't limit me with photoshop editing or anything like that?
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post #4 of 5
I doubt it. What kind and size of files are you working with?
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
They can be upwards of a few gigs, usually 1 gb or less and more likely just MBs.

Those larger files are for panoramic photos and videos.
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