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AMD gaming rig a waste? - Page 3  

post #21 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xinoxide View Post
Whats wrong with being able to play games fine, AND save a boatload of money at the same time?

also, shop with your inner nerd, not your eyes bro.
Too bad an i3-2100 based system will be cheaper and faster than any Phenom II system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared2608 View Post
This was my reasoning from the begining. I've always held this opinion, and the SLI/Crossfire is just one of the things that bugs me about the Intel platform. I'm aware that in performance terms its negligible, but it still costs the same and it grates me.

One of the reasons I wanted to ask the community here about this is that this forum us super busy, and I think generally the opinions on here are more varied than on our local forums. I'm not so worried about spending a bit more on the ROG board than on a cheaper AMD board, I can afford the ROG board and the rig will still make my budget. What nags at me is spending similar money on an Intel board and getting less for it and an intel rig in general comes out more expensive.

Obviously if the AMD system was plain bad that'd be different, but if it can at least keep up and even possibly go toe to toe with the Intel when the new chips come out then suddenly the Intel platform doesn't shine so brightly anymore, at least in my opinion...
Wait, you don't like Intel's multi-GPU setup? You do realize AMD is garbage for multiple GPUs right?

You do realize the i3-2100 will outperform any AMD chip, even those that cost more right?
    
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post #22 of 95
Thread Starter 
We have all the same boards available as any of you guys do, that's not the really the problem. Our problem comes with the exchange rate. For some odd reason things don't always convertequally.

Example, an Asus P8P68-Pro is R1995.00, but. ROG Crosshair V Formula goes for around R2195.00, the dofference is almost nothing, but the difference in feauture is pretty big.

I always shop with my inner nerd(I loved this), but I also like it when things I buy make me happy all round, not just in one way or the other. As for playing games well and saving cahs, well there's nothing wrong with that, that's exactly why I asked this, lol!
post #23 of 95
Thread Starter 
I looked at the i3 chips, but they're not that much cheaper than PII chip, and the Intel boards are never cheap no matter the chipset. I understand that coming from South Africa my situation will differ because our pricing is different, but the basic priciples are still similar.
post #24 of 95
@ OP if you are not crossfiring, then what is the point of spending all that extra money on that board?
IMO, purchasing a 2500k is a good investment for the future. Right now, PII arch is already showing its age, and the next generation of gpu architecture is right around the corner, bottlenecking problems will get worse.
You won't see that problem with an 1155 socket chip, and you leaves you room to upgrade to Ivy Bridge when the time is right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Dog View Post
There's nothing wrong with AMD chips.

They are not as far behind as reviews make them out to be when over clocked.

Most sites that show over clocked results do not over clock the north bridge at all which is wrong as over clocking the north bridge makes more a difference then overclocking the CPU itself does.

Sandy Bridge is very nice but I personally refuse to buy a brand new platform in the year 2011 that can't offer SLI/CF at x16/x16. I know it's because Intel moved the PCIEX lanes onto the CPU die but's it's still unacceptable.
You realize that as long as it doesn't dip below x8 it won't cause a bottleneck right?
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post #25 of 95
Sorry Intel motherboards cost so much more in SA, AMD it is then.
    
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post #26 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Dog View Post
If you over clock both the CPU and Northbridge by 30% each you'll see more of a performance boost from the Northbridge.

Infact see this
I see what you mean, I didn't realize the performance difference was that substantial. I've learned something new today, thank you! But you know why this happens right?

Motherboard manufacturers limit the stock speed of the Northbridge because of obvious things like voltage and temperature. The Northbridge handles all of the communication between the RAM, PCI-Express, and CPU. Think of it as a Highway.

Increasing the clock on the CPU allows the processor to do extra calculations per second. A unit of Hertz is equal to the inverse of 1 second. So if your computer was 200Mhz fast, then it can do 200,000,000 floating point calculations per second (theoretically if no latency was assumed and each calculation took 1 cycle each).

As you are rushing information from the RAM or your PCI-E card to be calculated, it goes through the Northbridge (down the highway for example). As the CPU allows more and more calculations to be fed per second from it's Cache, it asks or give more and more information from the RAM and PCI-E. So more cars down the highway, eventually the Northbridge gets clustered and you have a traffic jam. The CPU gets starved out and you don't have the CPU running at its full potential.

So you decide to increase the Northbridge (widen the lanes), more cars are able to get through and none of the components are starved. So this is why the Northbridge should be overclocked, it will help keep your components from starving eachother out, which would explain why you see gains in performance.

If someone sees a fallacy in my information, please don't hesitate to call me out. I'm a Computer Engineer student, but I only know so much ^_^
post #27 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared2608 View Post
I was all set to get this board and a 965 BE as a place holder for BD
If you are truly getting a placeholder you might as well go with a 955 and save $40 or so. Odds are that you can clock up the 955 just as fast as the 965 anyways.
    
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post #28 of 95
Nothing wrong with AMD, Even with my 1055T set at it's stock 2.8GHz, I can still max out practically any game, includeing Crysis
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post #29 of 95
Thread Starter 
I've read that x8/x8 is no different to x16/x16.
post #30 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by modinn View Post
I see what you mean, I didn't realize the performance difference was that substantial. I've learned something new today, thank you! But you know why this happens right?

Motherboard manufacturers limit the stock speed of the Northbridge because of obvious things like voltage and temperature. The Northbridge handles all of the communication between the RAM, PCI-Express, and CPU. Think of it as a Highway.

Increasing the clock on the CPU allows the processor to do extra calculations per second. A unit of Hertz is equal to the inverse of 1 second. So if your computer was 200Mhz fast, then it can do 200,000,000 floating point calculations per second (theoretically if no latency was assumed and each calculation took 1 cycle each).

As you are rushing information from the RAM or your PCI-E card to be calculated, it goes through the Northbridge (down the highway for example). As the CPU allows more and more calculations to be fed per second from it's Cache, it asks or give more and more information from the RAM and PCI-E. So more cars down the highway, eventually the Northbridge gets clustered and you have a traffic jam. The CPU gets starved out and you don't have the CPU running at its full potential.

So you decide to increase the Northbridge (widen the lanes), more cars are able to get through and none of the components are starved. So this is why the Northbridge should be overclocked, it will help keep your components from starving eachother out, which would explain why you see gains in performance.

If someone sees a fallacy in my information, please don't hesitate to call me out. I'm a Computer Engineer student, but I only know so much ^_^
I can sum it up easier then that, Phenom 2 CPU's are hideously bandwidth starved that's why over clocking the Northbridge makes such a big difference.
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