Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Trying to understand i5 2500k temps in Speedfan, HWM, and Relatemp
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Trying to understand i5 2500k temps in Speedfan, HWM, and Relatemp

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Currently ive got a Thermalright MUX120 cooler on my new i5 2500k.

The first day I put it on, my CPU temp was steady at 25-26c idle.

For some reason, the past 2 days whenever I look at the temps in RealTemp, Hardware Monitor, and Speedfan they start at 26-27c (which is fine) then start jumping around and fluctuating from 27c to 34c.

So right now im looking at it and its just jumping from 26c to 34c every couple seconds.

Why is it doing this? Is it normal? Should I be worried?

thanks
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 5
Yeh thats normal. Your CPU is just getting used for a split second and it raises the temp
^3
(11 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 5930K  EVGA x99 Micro EVGA GTX 980 SC ACX 16GB Corsair DDR4 Vengeance LPX Black PC4-21300 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
500GB Samsung 840 EVO H105 Win 10 ASUS ROG PG279 
KeyboardPowerCase
Ducky Shine 1 MX-Red Corsair AX 860i  Fractal Design Node 804 Black 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i7 @ 2.6  GT650 16GB of 1600 MHz DDR3L SDRAM 256GB SSD 
OSMonitorKeyboard
Mac OSX Lion Retina Display US layout 
  hide details  
Reply
^3
(11 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 5930K  EVGA x99 Micro EVGA GTX 980 SC ACX 16GB Corsair DDR4 Vengeance LPX Black PC4-21300 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
500GB Samsung 840 EVO H105 Win 10 ASUS ROG PG279 
KeyboardPowerCase
Ducky Shine 1 MX-Red Corsair AX 860i  Fractal Design Node 804 Black 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i7 @ 2.6  GT650 16GB of 1600 MHz DDR3L SDRAM 256GB SSD 
OSMonitorKeyboard
Mac OSX Lion Retina Display US layout 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Ohhh ok, cool. Wasnt sure. Worried me when its constantly fluctuating and im not doing anything.

thanks!
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 5
Yeah, normal, thats EIST at work. CPU gets used for a split second so they jump up instantly, and then back down.

Read this also.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealTemp Creator/Author (unclewebb) 
The Problems

Intel designed these temperature sensors to control thermal throttling and thermal shut down and for those purposes, they tend to work excellent. They were never designed to be used to report accurate core temperatures.

The first problem is that TJMax is not a clearly defined value. Intel released a lot of information last year but they now refer to this data as TJ Target. Actual TJMax for any processor can either be equal to TJ Target or in some cases it might be slightly higher than the Intel listed TJ Target. Unfortunately, Intel did not provide the user community with any information about how much TJMax tends to vary. Based on my testing and reports from users, a 5C difference doesn't seem too unusual with 65nm and TJMax might vary by 10C in the 45 nm CPUs. The result is that two CPUs with the exact same model number might have different TJMax values and it also seems that there are situations where cores on the same CPU can have different TJMax values. For the 45nm processors, TJ Target and TJ Max seem to be similar but for the older 65nm CPUs, actual TJ Max can be 10C or higher for many processors.

Starting with Core i7, Intel has improved this situation by including the TJ Target goal within each CPU. This information is still only TJ Target though so there is no guarantee that the actual TJMax of a core is exactly equal to the value stored within each core of these processors but at least this is a step in the right direction.

The next issue that effects all of these sensors is slope error. That is when the data coming from these sensors moves at a different rate than the core temperature is changing at. The Calibration feature in RealTemp is used to compensate for sensors that move along different temperature curves and once again the Core i7 sensors seem to be greatly improved with only very minimal slope error in the normal temperature range.

The biggest problem is that the sensors used on the 45nm Core 2 Dual and Quad core processors can become saturated or can become stuck at lower temperatures. As your core temperature decreases, they might reach a temperature where they continue to report the exact same temperature even though your CPU continues to cool down. With a stuck sensor, there is nothing you can do about it and it prevents you from doing an accurate calibration of your temperature sensors.

With all of these problems, it's obvious why Intel has never recommended using these sensors to report accurate core temperatures. My opinion is that as long as your sensors are not stuck and you are able to calibrate them then you should be able to get some reasonably accurate core temperatures out of them. The sensors simply aren't designed or documented well enough to report 100% accurate core temperatures. All software is going to be limited by these problems. RealTemp is the only program I know of that is fully adjustable and tries to make sense out of the sometimes random looking and chaotic data coming from Intel's digital thermal sensors.

SOURCE: http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/docs.php
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K [24/7: 4.9ghz 1.47v] ASRock P67 Extreme 4 (B3) EVGA Geforce 570 [890/2200 1.1v] G.Skill Ripjaws 2x4GB 1600Mhz 
Hard DriveMonitorPowerCase
WD Caviar Black 1TB HP f2105 1680x1050 Corsair TX750 V2 (backup Antec BP550W) Antec 902 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K [24/7: 4.9ghz 1.47v] ASRock P67 Extreme 4 (B3) EVGA Geforce 570 [890/2200 1.1v] G.Skill Ripjaws 2x4GB 1600Mhz 
Hard DriveMonitorPowerCase
WD Caviar Black 1TB HP f2105 1680x1050 Corsair TX750 V2 (backup Antec BP550W) Antec 902 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
thanks
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 2500k Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3 HIS Radeon HD 6850 1GB Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOSPowerCase
Hitachi 1.5TB 7200rpm Windows 7 Pro Corsair VX550W Lian Li Lancool K58W 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Trying to understand i5 2500k temps in Speedfan, HWM, and Relatemp