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GTX 570 Gainward Phantom vs EVGA vs MSI N570GTX Twin Frozr III PE/OC Which is Better

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Which do you think is better ?
I saw many good reviews and recommendations on the msi gtx 570 twin frozr iii

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127582&Tpk=MSI%20N570%20GTX%20Twin%20Frozr%20III

it's also cooler and quiter than others ..
but i'm really considering performance more than anything else..
so which actually has the highest performance ? :>

i also heared that msi can overclock well tongue.gif is this true?
post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by shockeri;15145207 
Which do you think is better ?
I saw many good reviews and recommendations on the msi gtx 570 twin frozr iii

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127582&Tpk=MSI%20N570%20GTX%20Twin%20Frozr%20III

it's also cooler and quiter than others ..
but i'm really considering performance more than anything else..
so which actually has the highest performance ? :>

i also heared that msi can overclock well tongue.gif is this true?


What is also a PCB Reference and RMA ? .. please explain to me >.<</div>

The overclockability depends entirely on the GPU chip itself - any flaws or imperfections during manufacturing reduce the ability to push the clocks further. Brand name doesn't necessarily have anything to do with how much performance you'll be able to achieve out of a certain card. However, cards with superior cooling systems will probably be able to achieve higher speeds while maintaining a lower temperature.

By "PCB Reference" I assume you're referring to "Reference Design" - this means the GPU cooler is made to a stock specification provided by the GPU manufacturer. Typically dual-fans, copper heatpipes, or any other fancy things like this won't be found on a reference design video card.

RMA means "Return Merchandise Authorization" - This refers to a specific ID number that a retailer or manufacturer will give to you in order to have your returned product sorted properly.
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broseidon;15145452 
The overclockability depends entirely on the GPU chip itself - any flaws or imperfections during manufacturing reduce the ability to push the clocks further. Brand name doesn't necessarily have anything to do with how much performance you'll be able to achieve out of a certain card. However, cards with superior cooling systems will probably be able to achieve higher speeds while maintaining a lower temperature.

By "PCB Reference" I assume you're referring to "Reference Design" - this means the GPU cooler is made to a stock specification provided by the GPU manufacturer. Typically dual-fans, copper heatpipes, or any other fancy things like this won't be found on a reference design video card.

RMA means "Return Merchandise Authorization" - This refers to a specific ID number that a retailer or manufacturer will give to you in order to have your returned product sorted properly.

Oh mate,Thanks alot ,perfect explanation i was kinda lost.
do you think a 52A is enough for the msi gtx 570 PE/OC ? 500w combined?
and to be able to safe overclock it further ? ,just wondering.
post #4 of 6
Hi Shockeri smile.gif
I use MSI GTX570TFII OC 945/1100 1.1volt stable sofar with Corsair TX650 which has 52A of combined amps, just like your question.... so you will do fine with that PSU smile.gif I tried also overclocking ASUS GTX580 DCU2 to 925mhz with my TX650 and can still finished benchmarks ^_^
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post #5 of 6
those gainward cards are great but unless you are in a country that actually sells them it can be hard to get your rma.. I would love one in the USA but a rma would equal sending it to europe.
post #6 of 6
I would personally go with the MSI TFIII PE/OC card. The Gainward is supposed to be a good card and quiet, likely quieter than the MSI actually, but the EVGA is inferior to both those cards. Because you mentioned outright performance as a strong consideration, the MSI is the clear recommendation IMO. The MSI should on average have a slightly higher chance of reaching a high OC due to the internal binning that MSI does, you can find more information about this here. It by no means guarantees a high overclock, but you should have a better chance of getting lucky with the MSI over the Gainward which only has one or two tiers of products to the MSI's 3 or 4.

Also to expand on the explanation of reference design, it's important to note that you can have a non reference card that uses a reference PCB with the reference amount of components but slightly tweaked components themselves. This is really confusing I know, but basically how this relates to you is that in terms of the 570 the problem with the reference PCB (printed circuit board), and this holds true for cards that have a non reference cooler on top of the reference PCB, is that it only uses a 4+2 phase power design which was prone to many failures earlier on. The failures appear to be largely behind us now, but still a card with a custom PCB and additional power phases like the 6+1 in the MSI or the 6+2 in the Gainward (the first number is the amount of power phases for the GPU core and is much more important in this case than the second number which is the amount of power phases for the memory) is preferred over the EVGA card with it's reference PCB.
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