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[Pop Sci] Physicists Say Speed-of-Light-Breaking Neutrinos Would've Lost Their Energy - Page 10

post #91 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwarren View Post
Personally I think that speed for modern people is a technoligical brick wall in terms of ability to travel to places. I think that we haven't even touched what technology is capable of. I think that in the future people will look back and laugh at us people that thought that it would take millions of years to leave the milky way. They will probably have the technology to bend space and travel nearly instantaneously to any wheres in the universe.

Speed will probably be looked upon as the long.....long way to travel to places as there are ways to travel to places (in theory) besides going really fast such as bending space. I think that humans will eventually come in contact with lots of other intelligent beings too and that it will spark a revolution in history.
Even if intelligent life find us, they will more then likely not help us and wipe us out, taking all our resources and limited technology.
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post #92 of 98
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Originally Posted by cl04k3d View Post
Even if intelligent life find us, they will more then likely not help us and wipe us out, taking all our resources and limited technology.
I don't know about that. Personally I think that if intelligent life found us that would make them ahead of us. To get that ahead they most likely are pretty pacifist or else they would have destroyed their own civilization.

I personally think that they would either leave us a lone or help us by giving them what ever technology's that they have maybe even turning us into whatever race that they are.
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post #93 of 98
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Originally Posted by Mwarren View Post
I don't know about that. Personally I think that if intelligent life found us that would make them ahead of us. To get that ahead they most likely are pretty pacifist or else they would have destroyed their own civilization.

I personally think that they would either leave us a lone or help us by giving them what ever technology's that they have maybe even turning us into whatever race that they are.
Well, that's a bit optimistic. Intelligent life other then us that are significantly ahead of us shouldn't imply they will be pacifists. For all we know, they're planet could've formed many many years earlier then ours, and they evolved many many years earlier than us. Destroy their own civilization? Doubt it. Look at us now.

I personally think, that Intelligent Life will either
A. See us as small goddam bugs
B. See us as interesting species they have ecountered.
C. See us as their equal as a sentience life form
post #94 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbatemper View Post
Well, that's a bit optimistic. Intelligent life other then us that are significantly ahead of us shouldn't imply they will be pacifists. For all we know, they're planet could've formed many many years earlier then ours, and they evolved many many years earlier than us. Destroy their own civilization? Doubt it. Look at us now.

I personally think, that Intelligent Life will either
A. See us as small goddam bugs
B. See us as interesting species they have ecountered.
C. See us as their equal as a sentience life form
The earth doesn't have any resources that 10 billion other planets don't so its kinda foolish for us to think otherwise. Any energy they'd expend traveling light years to get to us would be better used mining or heating or whatever.

The only thing we have to offer is slave labor. That's it.
    
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post #95 of 98
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Originally Posted by u3b3rg33k View Post
So you're saying that their gravity prevents the light from escaping that universe and heading this way? Wouldn't it just have a massive red shift and still move towards us @ c?
Quote:
Originally Posted by _02 View Post
The only thing I know of with that much gravity would be a singularity, or black hole.



The further you look out, the faster things seem to be expanding away from us. But isn't that just because the further you look out, the older the light is? We would be seeing the red shift of these distant objects from much earlier in the universe's life, when it was expanding more rapidly.
No, we will never get to see any light, not even redshift. The light will simply not reach us from the parts of the universe that are expanding away from us and this expansion is faster than the speed of light.

Imagine this: We have a square foot of rubber sheet of a mm thick. 4 marbles are glued an inch away from each corner. Now take 4 people each holding a corner of this rubber sheet and everyone starts to back off, stretching the rubber sheet in all directions. That is the expansion. Imagine each marble to be a universe. The diagonally opposite marbles move away from each other faster than those on each horizontal/vertical sides.
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post #96 of 98
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Originally Posted by MagicBox View Post
No, we will never get to see any light, not even redshift. The light will simply not reach us from the parts of the universe that are expanding away from us and this expansion is faster than the speed of light.
I wasn't thinking about the expansion of space itself adding to their recession from us and definitely wasn't aware that objects are accelerating away from us faster than light. I was thinking about how we can see redshift that equates to faster than speed of light expansion from very old light, but didn't get the whole picture (doubt I still do).

Quote:
...Thus, although it's impossible to move through space (locally) faster than the speed of light, and it's impossible for anyone within the universe to send off a piece of "information" faster than the speed of light, it is still possible for the distances between faraway galaxies to increase faster than the speed of light, due to the rate at which the space between them is stretching. This faster than light "travel" doesn't have any effect on the material that makes up the galaxies (for example, their energy does not become infinite in any meaningful sense), since they aren't really moving with respect to each other in any way that they can measure directly.
It still doesn't seem to make sense, but I'm sure I just don't have a firm grasp on the concept.
    
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post #97 of 98
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Originally Posted by MagicBox View Post
Imagine this: We have a square foot of rubber sheet of a mm thick. 4 marbles are glued an inch away from each corner. Now take 4 people each holding a corner of this rubber sheet and everyone starts to back off, stretching the rubber sheet in all directions. That is the expansion. Imagine each marble to be a universe. The diagonally opposite marbles move away from each other faster than those on each horizontal/vertical sides.
But neutrinos can't go faster than light, never mind a whole galaxy. That flies in the face of special relativity, does it not? I'm thinking of the twin paradox specifically.
Edited by u3b3rg33k - 10/12/11 at 6:33am
 
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post #98 of 98
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Originally Posted by u3b3rg33k View Post
But neutrinos can't go faster than light, never mind a whole galaxy. That flies in the face of special relativity, does it not? I'm thinking of the twin paradox specifically.
I'm still wrapping my head around it, I haven't read much about actual space time inflation. But here's another quote:

Quote:
You ask a good question, one whose answer lies in the subtle difference between expansion that is faster than the speed of light and the propagation of information that is faster than the speed of light. The latter is forbidden by fundamental physical laws, but the former is allowed; that is, as long as you are not transmitting any information (like a light pulse), you can make something happen at a speed that is faster than that of light. The expansion of the Universe is a "growth" of the spacetime itself; this spacetime may move faster than the speed of light relative to some other location, as long as the two locations can't communicate with each other (or, in terms of light rays, these two parts of the Universe can't see each other). According to the theory of inflation, the Universe grew by a factor of 10 to the sixtieth power in less than 10 to the negative thirty seconds, so the "edges" of the Universe were expanding away from each other faster than the speed of light; however, as long as those edges can't see each other (which is what we always assume), there is no physical law that forbids it.
    
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