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PSU fan control

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Is it based on temperature, or load?

Lets assume it has the same load, and 20°C intake air, or 60°C intake air, would the fan rpm be the same?

Or is this different with every PSU brand/class?
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post #2 of 6
I would guess it varies, although temperature-based seems more likely to me.

According to Seasonic's site, my X-750's fan speed depends on the temperature:

Quote:
The X automatically adjusts fan mode and speed according to the ambient temperature level.
post #3 of 6
I believe its based on temperature rather then load, as it has temperature sensors in the psu that monitor and control the fan speed based on how hot it is.
post #4 of 6
From what I have looked up it is based on temperature of the PSU itself and not air intake temperature.

It would be hard to say something defintive as make there are some higher end units that do have this.
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post #5 of 6
Well looking at it from a functionality (at least common sense), you're going to want to control your fan speed based on how much you can cool off your components that you're monitoring. For all intensive purposes a faster fan means more air which should mean cooler parts. I don't believe any computer parts with fans or fan controllers ever really monitor the intake temperature itself, but I know I could be wrong (exceptions ftl)
post #6 of 6
The fan speed is usually determined by the temperature inside the PSU. Often it's sensed by a thermistor on or near the primary side heatsink. Different models and brands have different fan profiles.
How hot that primary side gets depends on ambient temps, and load, so while ambients have an affect, it's pretty minor compared to load.
Obviously a more efficient PSU will be more effective at turning AC power into computer power, and waste less of it as heat.
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