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[Official] The Mouse Suggestion Thread - Page 52

post #511 of 6214
I believe Razer added some dynamic DPI scaling crap that never got removed. In return you have your mouse scaling up and down randomly, but I'm not sure if a recent driver fixed that.
post #512 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

Hes over hyping the accel. I'm not agreeing that it's perfect, but the average person isn't going to freaking notice a minimal 5% -/+ curve.
Do I want a linear sensor? Sure, but sometimes I feel that stuff gets blown way out of proportion.
Why doesn't the PTE count? It has no accel.
I suppose I'm picky with how stuff is explained. You see, I don't view the 9500/9800 as a LASER, but rather a CMOS sensor. CMOS sensors can use a VCSEL(LASER), or LED(OPTICAL) illumination sources.
When you say "The G500 and G700 are both mice which use a LASER sensor that has acceleration built in". The common person is going to interpret that like all LASER mice have acceleration when thats not even the case. The truth of the matter is that there are many VCSEL CMOS based sensors that offer linear tracking, though the previous gaming architecture has been discontinued and all current non gaming models dont work as well in this environment.
Are the 9500/9800 common? Sure I'll agree with that.
I've used my friend's Xai before, and it is noticeable if you are using a low sensitivity.
I also don't count the twin eye because it's a different type of sensor, and usually labelled as a twin eye sensor when you buy a mouse with it.
post #513 of 6214
My old MX revolution has a "Laser" sensor that has no acceleration afaik. Same for G3, G5, G7 and G9. You cannot just say all laser sensors have acceleration.
post #514 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post

My old MX revolution has a "Laser" sensor that has no acceleration afaik. Same for G3, G5, G7 and G9. You cannot just say all laser sensors have acceleration.
Well, that would explain why I never said that all LASER sensors have acceleration.
post #515 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Vanelay View Post

I've used my friend's Xai before, and it is noticeable if you are using a low sensitivity.
I also don't count the twin eye because it's a different type of sensor, and usually labelled as a twin eye sensor when you buy a mouse with it.

It's noticeable if you're looking for a flaw or have a fair bit of experience with another products without any minor acceleration curve then instantly switch, though it isn't impossible to relearn or grasp the pattern of how you game.

A lot of this is simply psychological and I only realized this after learning how to game left handed. Yes anyone would be more comfortable with a perfect sensor, but practice and skill goes way further regardless.

On a personal level, motion on my right hand is much more skilled and the small accel curve doesn't really hinder me, though I can see how it might be a problem if you've learned a certain way on a specific sensor than swapped out to something slightly different. In which case, what I feel left handed (limited experience, 6 months).

You know it's funny. The architects in charge of these sensors don't acknowledge the small accel. Suppose they're casuals ^^

I already know quite a bit of people disagree with me, but that's okay. This simply how feel about the subject. I would like a linear 9500/9800 regardless.

As for twin eye. I actually consider this a "real laser" sensor as it uses a newer Doppler method technology to track. Ofc this is much different than what people are used to and thus issues are formed from using the tech improperly (aka cloth surfaces causing tracking imperfections), though the sensor is still sensitive itself if you don't keep up with cleaning the area.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Vanelay View Post

Well, that would explain why I never said that all LASER sensors have acceleration.

Though I got the impression that all laser mice have acceleration.
Edited by Skylit - 10/8/12 at 3:12pm
post #516 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

It's noticeable if you're looking for a flaw or have a fair bit of experience with another products without any minor acceleration curve then instantly switch, though it isn't impossible to relearn or grasp the pattern of how you game.
A lot of this is simply psychological and I only realized this after learning how to game left handed. Yes anyone would be more comfortable with a perfect sensor, but practice and skill goes way further regardless.
On a personal level, motion on my right hand is much more skilled and the small accel curve doesn't really hinder me, though I can see how it might be a problem if you've learned a certain way on a specific sensor than swapped out to something slightly different. In which case, what I feel left handed (limited experience, 6 months).
You know it's funny. The architects in charge of these sensors don't acknowledge the small accel. Suppose they're casuals ^^
I already know quite a bit of people disagree with me, but that's okay. This simply how feel about the subject. I would like a linear 9500/9800 regardless.
As for twin eye. I actually consider this a "real laser" sensor as it uses a newer Doppler method technology to track. Ofc this is much different than what people are used to and thus issues are formed from using the tech improperly (aka cloth surfaces causing tracking imperfections), though the sensor is still sensitive itself if you don't keep up with cleaning the area.
It may be just from the fact that I have only used mice with the DIP-20 optical sensor for extended periods of time, but I definitely notice it whenever there is some kind of acceleration curve. You may get used to it, but because your mouse won't point to the same place every time, due to the acceleration, you won't be as good as if you were using a mouse with no acceleration, due to the muscle memory. That's how one of my friends convinced me that acceleration and prediction were terrible.

The twin eye sensor is definitely a good sensor, but it only works on hard surfaces, and it is incredibly sensitive to dust. It would be nice if they found a way to fix that.
post #517 of 6214
Quote:
You may get used to it, but because your mouse won't point to the same place every time, due to the acceleration, you won't be as good as if you were using a mouse with no acceleration, due to the muscle memory.

You and many others may repeat and claim the same lines over and over, but I don't agree at this point in time. The human body and brain can adapt to stuff well beyond what people can imagine. I mean were not cavemen after all, are we? The level of individual skill and comfort are much more important factors imho.
Edited by Skylit - 10/8/12 at 3:48pm
post #518 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Vanelay View Post

You may get used to it, but because your mouse won't point to the same place every time, due to the acceleration, you won't be as good as if you were using a mouse with no acceleration, due to the muscle memory.

Pseudoscience. I agree with Skylit.
post #519 of 6214
I could bring factors into the mix that people don't really care about, though If I pushed hard enough... People from left and right will start making a big deal about it..lol
Edited by Skylit - 10/8/12 at 4:17pm
post #520 of 6214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylit View Post

I could bring factors into the mix that people don't really care about, though If I pushed hard enough... People from left and right will start making a big deal about it..lol
Maybe it's like the 120Hz vs 60Hz thing. lol
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