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Melted 8 pin 12v - Page 2

post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226 View Post
I've seen this at work a number of times, and the PSU was usually to blame. It is possible that something (dust or whatever) got into the connection and caused an increase in resistance in the connector itself, thus building up heat to melting/charring point. Both times I've seen this in the last year, however, the PSU ended up being to blame.

I'd recommend testing the PSU, or replacing it if you want to take a chance. That's where I'd put my money.

Edit: You're also going to need to replace those damaged connectors, so if the mobo connector is damaged you're pretty well boned. I've seen a mobo continue to operate with melted/charred connections, but you're really taking a dangerous risk of fire if you do.
My mobo has 2 EPS headers, so I would be just fine.
The problem is the mobo wasn't actually doing very well before that, it was kinda dead because of static problems.
post #12 of 46
Here is a good diagram of pin layouts for some PSU connectors. I'm guess with yours, the problem is your +12v (once again probably a bad PSU).

post #13 of 46
As someone stated earlier, it is most likely because of poor contact. When you have a poor connection the resistance goes way up, which increases heat in that area.

Was the cable pulled tight at an odd angle? Was it not clipped in 100%?

I don't think it was a case of too much power draw, I think it was a bad connection.
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post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by corky dorkelson View Post
As someone stated earlier, it is most likely because of poor contact. When you have a poor connection the resistance goes way up, which increases heat in that area.

Was the cable pulled tight at an odd angle? Was it not clipped in 100%?

I don't think it was a case of too much power draw, I think it was a bad connection.
This is what I hope for and has a high percentage change of being my case. The extension I'm using is kinda a workaround thing, so maybe plastic is getting on the way.

I have already ordered a new and decent EPS extension and I guess I can try this out on my other EPS header.
If worse comes to worse I'll try to figure out whos to blame, the mobo or the PSU.
post #15 of 46
For a technical explaination:
Looking at the Antec TPQ-850 850W, looks like you have 4 +12v rails, and maybe one of those is pushing more current than it should. Lets say the input is expected to be 25 amps. If the circuit is designed to take +12v @ 25amps with a set resistance, and you increase the current (i=v/r), then you would have to decrease the resistance to compensate. Since you have a set amount of resistance, and the voltage is constant, too much current would potentially generate heat at connection points to let off some of that energy. Am I wrong, here?
post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by EduFurtado View Post
I have already ordered a new and decent EPS extension and I guess I can try this out on my other EPS header.
If worse comes to worse I'll try to figure out whos to blame, the mobo or the PSU.
The extension is to blame my friend. I wasn't aware you were using one. I am guessing you bought a $6 ebay extension?
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post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226 View Post
For a technical explaination:
Looking at the Antec TPQ-850 850W, looks like you have 4 +12v rails, and maybe one of those is pushing more current than it should. Lets say the input is expected to be 25 amps. If the circuit is designed to take +12v @ 25amps with a set resistance, and you increase the current (i=v/r), then you would have to decrease the resistance to compensate. Since you have a set amount of resistance, and the voltage is constant, too much current would potentially generate heat at connection points to let off some of that energy. Am I wrong, here?
I don't know if you're right or not. However, is there a way I can verify this through software?
Your theory coexists with the bad contact problem, right? I mean, one of them is pulling too much power because it's resistance is decreased for bad contact (aka, it's touching plastic in the middle of the ends).

Quote:
Originally Posted by corky dorkelson View Post
The extension is to blame my friend. I wasn't aware you were using one. I am guessing you bought a $6 ebay extension?
I actually bought a quality unit from performance-pcs. They ended up sending me a quality 8 pin for another format (if I recall it right a pci-e one). After some discussion people here said it would be OK to use the cable if I could fit it there, so I modded it to fit an EPS header. Probably this is the case. I had to take my rig apart right before the melting started, I must have put it back together lazily.
Edited by EduFurtado - 10/20/11 at 8:19am
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226 View Post
For a technical explaination:
Looking at the Antec TPQ-850 850W, looks like you have 4 +12v rails, and maybe one of those is pushing more current than it should. Lets say the input is expected to be 25 amps. If the circuit is designed to take +12v @ 25amps with a set resistance, and you increase the current (i=v/r), then you would have to decrease the resistance to compensate. Since you have a set amount of resistance, and the voltage is constant, too much current would potentially generate heat at connection points to let off some of that energy. Am I wrong, here?
You're wrong. Sort of. Take every mention of the word "rails" out of that post and you might be close.
post #19 of 46
Thread Starter 
I am guessing at this point after contacting Sparkle it is a bad connection some how, maybe the 8 pin connector they use, the psu does still seem to work fine with every test i have done, but, i put an extention on itand than stressed the hell out of it, while the extention end plugged into the mobo header stays nice and cool, the other end of the extention plugged into the 8 pin coming from psu, gets so hot on the 2 center top pins it is hard to hold onto. As long as i dont stress it it all stays cool.

This is the second psu from sparkle to do this in the last 7 months, first one was there 1000watt gold, that one melted so bad it also melted the header on my asus mobo. They were pretty good and fast about the exchange even got a free 160gb usb hd from them, plus they offered to replace my asus mobo-but asus already 2 day shipped me a new one useing there arma.
Edited by fishhawk - 10/20/11 at 8:38am
    
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129 View Post
You're wrong. Sort of. Take every mention of the word "rails" out of that post and you might be close.
I'm not sure I understand. For each independent current limit, there would be a different rail in the PSU, no? That PSU has 4 different current limits (+12V1-4). If the PSU isn't limiting the current like it should on one of the rails, then overcurrent is possible, no? I'm not sure what you mean by your post. Would you please clarify instead of just telling me I'm wrong, by telling me how I'm wrong?
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