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Melted 8 pin 12v - Page 4

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226;15394121 
Remove your PSU and get it out of the case. Take a smell and see if the burnt plastic smell is coming from the PSU. Maybe try reconnecting it while it's outside the case and powering everything on. I wouldnt think that it would matter, as voltage should be applied to the rails even if nothing is drawing current, as long as the PSU is turned on. I would try to replace the EPS as well, however if the burning smell persists I wouldn't move forward without isolating the bad component. If you have a PSU tester, use it. If you have a multimeter, check all of the connectors to make sure they are all good.

Assuming your PSU isn't under warranty (and if it is, see if you can get them to replace it, due to potential fire hazard), remove the cover from the PSU (looks like 4 phillips head screws on the bottom where the intake fan is, and notice one should have a sticker about removing it voiding warranty). Take a look at the components, see if you notice any physical damage (such as burning, melting or even bulging capacitors. Take a close look at the rail connections to see if you notice any scarring or charring.

I hope both you and the OP luck out and are able to simply replace the connection and keep on trucking without replacing anything else, I'm just trying to stress the importance of avoiding potential fire hazard. Not likely mobo drawing too much current, as your PSU is designed to restrict current flow on each 12v rail. Either the connection or the PSU itself would be the culprit. Thanks again Phaedrus2129 for taking the time to explain the minor/major rail setup in the PSUs.

Sorry if I wan't that clear. The burning plastic smell is from the end of my extension, where it is connected (now melted) to one of my EPS headers.
I'll look into warranty, but I'm living in a foreign country and it's pretty hard to RMA from here. It would take forever and end up close to the value of a new PSU.


One thing I don't understand. How can I do something to keep my rails balanced?
And why is it a good PSU for enthusiasts and not for the normal user or overclocker like me? I thought it was just plug and play... I also bought this PSU after reading some reviews in johnny guru, this one called my attention for the performance X price
Edited by EduFurtado - 10/21/11 at 9:56am
post #32 of 46
Balancing rails is as simple as knowing which connectors are grouped on which rail. Rail balancing is one of the main complaints with the Corsair HX 1000 but Corsair has published a document identifying what is grouped on what rail. For single gpu (and the HX 1000) if you only use the fixed cables I do not see how you can go wrong,It is with multiple gpus that the potential for an unbalanced situation exists.See if your power supply manufacture will publish a chart as to what is grouped together (as Corsair did)
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post #33 of 46
I just remembered something that could be important!

My PSU came with a very tick cable with an american plug. But, I'm living in argentina, where they use the australian kind, so I had to buy another power cable. The best I found wasn't as tick as the one that came with the PSU, but it was rated for 1000W, and I don't remember how many As, and the voltage I think was rated for the voltage of the apartment.

Initially I wanted to buy an adapter from US to Australian, but I couldn't find one that also adapted the grounding pin.

So could this have anything to do with my melting case?

Furthermore, between my walled and the PSU there is one like this:

It also seemed to be rated OK for my system and only my monitor and my rig are connected to it.
Edited by EduFurtado - 10/22/11 at 10:04am
post #34 of 46
No. If the power cord wasn't think enough the only thing that could possibly melt due to that would be the power cord itself.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by EduFurtado View Post
I just remembered something that could be important!

My PSU came with a very tick cable with an american plug. But, I'm living in argentina, where they use the australian kind, so I had to buy another power cable. The best I found wasn't as tick as the one that came with the PSU, but it was rated for 1000W, and I don't remember how many As, and the voltage I think was rated for the voltage of the apartment.

Initially I wanted to buy an adapter from US to Australian, but I couldn't find one that also adapted the grounding pin.

So could this have anything to do with my melting case?

Furthermore, between my walled and the PSU there is one like this:


It also seemed to be rated OK for my system and only my monitor and my rig are connected to it.
Watts aren't as important as current with regards to what cables to use. 1000W sounds fine to me, and if it wasn't you would have other problems. Cables are rated for watts, but more importantly they have temperature limits that play a bigger role. If you are passing too much current over a cable or wire, the wire is going to heat up. If you plug it in and turn it on and the cable isn't warm or hot, you're fine. Thicker cables usually have higher current/temperature tolerances. If the cable wasn't good, you would likely see the cable warping, or scarring/burning/melting at the connection going into the back of the power supply or going at the wall. I'm guessing that the reason the cable wasn't as big was because (someone correct me if i'm wrong), but in the US we use 115v, and there you use 240v. That would require less current at 240v, so the cable wouldn't need to be as thick.

Your problem is coming out of the PSU, not going in. The same concept applies here. Those connectors and wires coming out of the PSU are rated for a certain amount of current. What I believe the general assumption is, is that something caused too much current to be "pulled" across that connection, which caused it to heat up and melt. You could have a problem at the connector (conductive object got caught in the connection, and it could have been something as small as a broken tip from a lead pencil), or the PSU could have a short in it that would draw more current across the connector (that would likely be the ground for that 12v rail got shorted to something else). It's more likely that the connector was the culprit, but it's also a fair possibility that the PSU was damaged in the process.

If what you say is true, and the burning smell is only coming from the connector, then you should STOP using your computer until you replace that connector. You could damage your PSU if you are constantly pushing the current limits of the rail. If that plastic melts to the point where the pins/wires inside come in contact with one another, you could cause a lot more damage (potentially a fire). If you have already replaced the connector and it still smells like burning plastic (and it's not left over odor from the previous connector), take a close look at that PSU. Another thing, is the connection hot to the touch when in use (be careful handling that thing, as it could lead to shock)? Is the connection after that connection (i'm assuming the one at the mobo) hot to the touch? If so, think about the amount of current that's being drawn to the mobo. That would mean that resistance has been lowered over that circuit. It could be something shorted on the motherboard. If both of these connections are hot, do you have a buddy that has a spare PSU you can test with? DONT put your PSU in his system.
post #36 of 46
Tomorrow as soon as I wake up I'll connect my PSU directly to my mobo and check if it's cable warms up like when I'm using the extension.

I hope we can make sure what the problem is in this process.
If it still warms up I'll check warranty, if it still valid, I'll see if it's worth RMAing or just buying another PSU locally for 3 times the american price. If I no longer have warranty I'll open it up to clean things up and check for any visual damage. If cleaning solves the problem, case is over. If not, new PSU. Maybe I'll ask a friend for a PSU or take it to a local repair shop where they will do sins to my beloved rig (I'll first just ask if -I- can test it with one of their PSUs )

Thank you for the input, it's been very helpful. I'll update tomorrow ASAP.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226 View Post
Here is a good diagram of pin layouts for some PSU connectors. I'm guess with yours, the problem is your +12v (once again probably a bad PSU).

I just found out the melting is related to pin #7 on the CPU connection of this diagram.
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by EduFurtado View Post
I just found out the melting is related to pin #7 on the CPU connection of this diagram.
Okay, if you can effectively narrow it down to a single pin, then you have a greater probability that it was foreign matter in the connection on that one pin. Your PSU might still be okay if this is the case, it really just depends on how long that rail was pretty much pegged out at it's current limits. They generally build PSUs to take some punishment without damaging internal components. I think if the damage is on a single pin, you have a pretty good shot at just replacing the extension. Just be sure that the connection is clean of any debris and the connection is firm and well seated. /fingerscrossed
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arimis5226 View Post
Okay, if you can effectively narrow it down to a single pin, then you have a greater probability that it was foreign matter in the connection on that one pin. Your PSU might still be okay if this is the case, it really just depends on how long that rail was pretty much pegged out at it's current limits. They generally build PSUs to take some punishment without damaging internal components. I think if the damage is on a single pin, you have a pretty good shot at just replacing the extension. Just be sure that the connection is clean of any debris and the connection is firm and well seated. /fingerscrossed
I have no idea how I am going to disconnect the extension from the PSU. They are also glued together. A while ago they weren't. I should have done all this testing before..

By the way, the whole plug get's hot, and there is visible melting on the 8th pin, but that's minor and probably should be a reflex from the 7th, whee it's clearly damaged.
Edited by EduFurtado - 10/23/11 at 4:23pm
post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 
Here is the pic of my melted 8 pin, it is the top 4 pins that melted, but only blackened the pins on the mobo. Asus is doing an advanced rma for me even though they beleive it was the psu,s fault and the mobo seems to work just fine. Sparkle is not happy about admitting it was there psu that caused it, but i do beleive it was just a bad connection. Sparkle at this time says they will replace my 1250 psu, but i,m not sure if i even want it, this is the second one that this happened too.
    
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