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Want to learn how to render - Page 2

post #11 of 13
C4D is hands down one of the best places to start, since its interface is very intuitive and it's pretty damn powerful too.

I would go to GreyScaleGorilla and begin his tutorials. That way you'll get up and running in a short amount of time and get to render cool stuff.
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post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
@emmuh I'm not at least closed minded about software, but i chose c4d as it seemed most newb friendly just to get me started
(as i said in first post i know how to work in autocad in solidworks in proengineer and in catia -and for example i would choose to work in catia everyday, but know that solidworks is more powerfull allthough more difficult to work with)

I intend to try more programs of course, like maya and 3dsmax, cinema 4d was only what seemed like a good place to start.

@Madmanden
Thanks for your post, that means a good deal to me, that i didn't choose wrong place to start
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post #13 of 13
Deathclaw,

Quite frankly I think the first problem you're going to run into is switching from NURBS Modeling to Box modeling (The first program I actually learned was Rhino 4.0). The difference between NURBS and Box modeling is that NURBS is for production, as in something that needs to be accurate to the .0001mm, while box modeling is not as precise as you dont need to be precise when working for film. Box Modeling is much quicker, and much more effecient than NURBS (my NURBS workflow was basically to draw the lines out to make the object then Sweep2 or Loft the planes in).

Any of these programs offer good box modeling solutions and none of them is right or wrong Cinema 4D, Maya, 3DS Max, XSI, Houdini.

Then comes UV Unwrapping, if you know how upholstery works this is basically the same thing, you basically are creating a 2D image of the 3D object so that you can tell the program where to put colors on the 3D object by placing them on the 2D image.

Then comes texturing
-Bump Map
-Normal Map
-Displacement Map
-Diffuse Map
-Specular Map
-Shaders

Then lighting
Global Illumination
Final Gather
Ambient Occlusion
HDRI

Then Rendering

Then Compositing!

Then you pat yourself on the back and say I'm awesomesauce


Found this at Cgsociety pertaining to positions in the industry.
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthre...=283&t=1014284

Quote:
Just off the top of my head (and apologies to any of my lovely colleagues if I accidentally skip their department), these are the roles you'll find in any big studio (ignoring HR, recruiting, IT and upper management as they're not specific to this industry):

Production

Line producers - deal with budgets, schedules, etc. They ensure the film is running on schedule and in accordance to budget.

Production manager - the name of this role may change from studio to studio but generally speaking, during a show each department (assets, animation, etc) will have a production manager who deals with production stuff for that department only. So similar to a line producer but a kind of mini overlord for that department specifically.

VFX producer - the overall studio-side producer for the show. Has the final call on bids, budgets, etc and deals directly with the clients.

Production co-ordinators - there are usually one or two per department, they deal directly with the artists on a day-to-day basis to ensure everyone knows what they need to do, keeps them up to date with schedules and scheduling changes, organises dailies, etc.

Editorial

VFX editor - these guys and gals keep up to date with all the latest changes from the client's edit, and manage all the shots for dailies and output.

There are definitely other job roles related to editorial like data ops and stuff, who deal with receiving all the turnover (footage) from the client, digitising stuff, dealing with storage and whatnot.

Art department

Concept artists - as the title suggests, they do concept art for the show. Not all studios have internal art departments but it does seem to be an increasing trend for them to have one.

Art director - oversees the conceptual work and sometimes also works on the overall look of the show together with the director and VFX sup.

VFX Artists

Roto - separate footage into useable layers for compositing. Kinda like using the Pen tool in Photoshop, but on a frame-by-frame basis to, for example, take a character from a plate and put it on its own layer, so that some CG can be inserted inbetween. This is commonly an entry-level position but many people do actually specialise in it longterm.

Matchmove / Tracking - make CG versions of the cameras on-set to ensure that rendered footage sits in the frame correctly.

Modeller - doesn't need an explanation.

Texture painter - doesn't need an explanation.

Rigger/Character TD - doesn't need an explanation, but do bear in mind that TD means "technical director", meaning that this is an artist who also has a strong technical skillset for scripting and other technical tasks.

Lookdev TD - sets up shaders.

Lighting TD - does lighting (lookdev and lighting artists often do both roles).

Generalist TD - an all round technical artist who can help with lots of different stuff.

FX / Effects TD - particles, simulations, cloth, etc.

Animator - doesn't need an explanation.

Animation director - oversees all animation on the show.

Matte painters - doesn't need an explanation.

Layout - works together with the art department to design the layout of props, buildings and stuff in scenes.

Compositors - usually just called comp, doesn't need an explanation.

CG supervisor - works beneath the VFX supervisor, often more directly and more frequently with the artists and department production than the VFX supervisor. Occasionally more than one per show.

VFX supervisor - oversees all the VFX, is basically in charge of the creative side of a show, but also deals with production. Studios assign one internal VFX sup to each show.

Technical

Pipeline TD / R&D - develops in-house tools and software to manage the studio's workflow.

Software engineer - develops in-house tools specifically related to creative processes (ie not pipeline related), although this role can differ from studio to studio.

Render wrangler - takes care of the render farm and manages rendering.

Hopefully I haven't left anyone out!
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