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Which CPU is right based on intended use? 2500K or 2600K? - Page 2

Poll Results: Which CPU to go with for my situation (well, wifes's)?

 
  • 80% (12)
    2500K
  • 20% (3)
    2600K
  • 0% (0)
    Other
15 Total Votes  
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoddimusPrime View Post
CS5 does not natively support CUDA as it states.
http://www.nvidia.com/object/adobe_photoshop.html
"Adobe Photoshop CS5 automatically detects NVIDIA® GeForce® or NVIDIA® Quadro® GPUs to enable these accelerated features."

To be specific, MPE natively supports CUDA.
Edited by jlells01 - 10/15/11 at 9:10pm
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlells01 View Post
http://www.nvidia.com/object/adobe_photoshop.html
"Adobe Photoshop CS5 automatically detects NVIDIA® GeForce® or NVIDIA® Quadro® GPUs to enable these accelerated features."

To be specific, MPE natively supports CUDA.
Take a look at this specific page. It says and I quote
Quote:
Maddeningly, Photoshop CS5 still does not support any native CUDA-accelerated functions, leaving us in the same boat as After Effects.
Again, the biggest advantages are plugins and encoding with Premier/Mercury Playback. They say those clearly make a difference. While I am not disputing that I do not see a review of say something like common native functions in Photoshop/Illustrator/Indesign seeing large benefits.

Granted, once Adobe gives more native support in the areas we tend to use Photoshop I think that will be awesome. Maybe CS6 will be out in the Spring. They just released CS5.5 not too long ago. And they always seem to be releasing things. It just gets expensive to constantly upgrade.

What would be interesting is to see if CUDA benefits other programs like GIMP.

And also, does AMD/ATI have a rival to CUDA?
Edited by RoddimusPrime - 10/15/11 at 9:20pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoddimusPrime View Post
Take a look at this specific page. It says and I quote
Dude...you're quoting something from November 2010; performance improvements are valid, but compatibility is a year out of date.

The Nvidia link is current (http://www.nvidia.com/object/adobe_photoshop.html) and shows common functions being accelerated.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlells01 View Post
Dude...you're quoting something from November 2010; performance improvements are valid, but compatibility is a year out of date.

The Nvidia link is current (http://www.nvidia.com/object/adobe_photoshop.html) and shows common functions being accelerated.
I'm simply pulling from the same thread you did. But, it is nice to see some things have been updated since then. What sucks is I have a 4870 2B Eyefinity card waiting for that rig.... lol.
post #15 of 16
Regarding your initial question though - Photoshop CS5 takes advantage of up to 12 threads; stock vs. stock, the 2600k will be up to 20-25% faster.
Edited by jlells01 - 10/15/11 at 9:29pm
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlells01 View Post
Regarding your initial question though - Photoshop CS5 takes advantage of up to 12 threads; stock vs. stock, the 2600k will be up to 20-25% faster.
Well I will have to consider going to MicroCenter then and getting $80 off between that and a MoBo. Will just need to figure out a motherboard.

Too bad AMD/ATI don't have a counter to CUDA. The best I could find was Stream. Guess there really isn't much to compete against CUDA.
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