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I3 to I5 worth it? - Page 3

post #21 of 30
ThrottleStop 4.00
http://www.techinferno.com/downloads/

The latest version lets Sandy Bridge owners access a wider range of turbo multipliers. Very handy when trying to control the heat output of one of these new laptop CPUs.
post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucethemoose View Post
First off, I want to dispel the myth that CPU power bump between an i3 and i5 even matters.
http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-...e.49600.0.html
Gotta love the Germans.


Personally, I think the performance difference between the i3 and i5 IGP is nearly negligible. The i5 may be a tiny bit better, but if you care about graphics, just get an A4 or an A6. HD 3000 is HD 3000, and it's not really meant for gaming any way you spin it.
Thank you for the link. I wasnt sure if it was neglible or not, with the new architecture, 800 mhz on the cpu, and 200mhz on the gpu might be another 10 or 15 fps for all I know. Your right, the HD3000 isnt really meant for gaming, however, for being an IGP, its far better than any of the low end IGP's that AMD offers in the price range, and it is plenty capable for playing the games that I intended to play with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrbroad77 View Post
$250 CPU upgrade for a $500 laptop... is this a serious question?!? If you really want a faster CPU, return that laptop and get an Ideapad Y470 for $700 with an i5 or $750 with an i7-2630QM. Both have Nvidia 550M Optimus graphics. http://shop.lenovo.com/SEUILibrary/c...%3A00004494%3A http://shop.lenovo.com/SEUILibrary/c...%3A00004495%3A

In the future it's usually not a good idea to buy a laptop with the intent of upgrading the CPU (or GPU). If you must.. wait a couple years until the prices drop on used i5 cpu's and it's a viable option.

Perhaps you misunderstood, this wasnt me saying that I was going to buy a CPU, this is a thread asking if its worth it. I wasnt sure if the the small increases given by the cpu turbo boost, and the 200 mhz increase on the IGP would make enough of a difference or not. Spending $250 on a $500 laptop to upgrade a component may not sound good to you, but it didnt cost me that much at all. For the money, this was the absolute fastest solution I could find, and im happy with the purchase.

I didnt think that I would be ridiculed for asking a question about an upgrade on an enthusiast site. That is what this site is all about anyways, getting the last drop of performance out of your hardware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by un1b4ll View Post
Wow there's lots of misunderstandings about mobile processors!

To answer your question, not even close, not on a system in that price range.

If the question was should I configure my laptop to be built with an i5 over an i3, the answer is a resounding yes... But an after the fact upgrade? Nah, you won't get your money's worth. CPU upgrades in laptops pretty much only make sense for enthusiasts, like going from a 2630qm to a 2960xm, for pretty much any other scenario though I'd say no, unless maybe you got the i5 for free.
So your logic says that if I were to buy it brand new, it would be worth it, but if I didnt buy it that way its not?


If I were to buy it with the I5 it would have been $600, I bought it for $300, if I bought the processor, it would be $550, essentially cheaper than buying it that way factory. Plus the added benefit of installing a better TIM to the CPU, which would potentially drop the temps by a few degrees.


Perhaps it would be best to state, that with the price I bought this laptop for, price isn't that big of a deal. Im more concerned with the performance difference. At any rate, its been stated that its not worth the difference, in which case I can spend the same amount on a SSD instead.
post #23 of 30
its NOT worth it

if you want an upgrade

just do this
http://forum.notebookreview.com/gami...periences.html
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by guyladouche View Post
I would say no--for a couple reasons.

First reason is speculation that the dell motherboard might not support the i5. And (assuming you were considering the 2500k, it would be a waste since your bios are probably locked so you wouldn't be able to overclock it).

Second is it turbos to 2.9GHz. I'm not sure what graphics card you have (and I'm assuming you're concerned about graphics performance since you mentioned your GPU), but I hesitate to imagine that you're cpu-limited with an i3 at 2.1GHz. In games optimized for more cores you *might* see a minimal improvement in fps with an i5.

But for $250? Even if it worked, I would still say no.

edit--I missed a couple things and was wrong about the turbo--I got confused, so forget the fact that I was talking about the turbo on the i3, which it obviously doesn't have.

Also, with a laptop, I think you definitely won't get any graphics performance with a faster processor.
Hit the nail on the head and saved me the time.
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post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raclimja View Post
its NOT worth it

if you want an upgrade

just do this
http://forum.notebookreview.com/gami...periences.html
I saw this recently, and I thought about it. Honestly, it completely defeats the purpose of having a laptop, and its portability if you need to lug around a PSU and eGraphics card and setup. If I wanted to go through all that, I would just use my desktop .

Thank you for the suggestion though.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post
I saw this recently, and I thought about it. Honestly, it completely defeats the purpose of having a laptop, and its portability if you need to lug around a PSU and eGraphics card and setup. If I wanted to go through all that, I would just use my desktop .

Thank you for the suggestion though.
All of this discussion could be a very moot point--you really should either call up dell support or hop on to their live chat/forums and actually verify that your laptop's motherboard can actually accommodate an i5.
    
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post #27 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by guyladouche View Post
All of this discussion could be a very moot point--you really should either call up dell support or hop on to their live chat/forums and actually verify that your laptop's motherboard can actually accommodate an i5.
No luck with dell...., however, I doubt they would make 2 different motherboards for the same laptop. Both the I5 2410 and the I3 2310 are available on the socket my motherboard has. I'm not saying that definitevely it will work, but I find it unlikely that Dell would have payed the cost of having two different motherboards manufactured for the same laptop just to accomodate a slightly faster CPU.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post
No luck with dell...., however, I doubt they would make 2 different motherboards for the same laptop. Both the I5 2410 and the I3 2310 are available on the socket my motherboard has. I'm not saying that definitevely it will work, but I find it unlikely that Dell would have payed the cost of having two different motherboards manufactured for the same laptop just to accomodate a slightly faster CPU.
It's a bios issue and what where the motherboard was intended to be used as opposed to what physically fits. Lots of motherboards need updated bios to use higher-level processors. For example, my desktop motherboard is fine to accept dual-core 45nm CPU's, but it requires a bios flash to work with 45nm quad-cores. Not typically a problem for component boards, but a big deal for prebuilts since the vendor generally doesn't release bios updates to accommodate cpu upgrades.

And in a general sense, lots of pre-built vendors tend to lock their bios--not specifically in reference to overclocking (though that's the most common reference), but rather because it is an added level of motivation for a consumer to buy their next highest level of product, as opposed to buying a base system and manually upgrading the CPU. They'll probably use identical motherboards in different models, only with different bios versions.

I can't say for 100% that the i5 wouldn't work, only that all of my personal experience would argue otherwise. If there were another i3, I'm sure that one would work, but when you change to a higher class of processor, specifically one that's guaranteed to use and dissipate more power, that's where you're almost guaranteed to encounter problems.
    
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post #29 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by guyladouche View Post
It's a bios issue and what where the motherboard was intended to be used as opposed to what physically fits. Lots of motherboards need updated bios to use higher-level processors. For example, my desktop motherboard is fine to accept dual-core 45nm CPU's, but it requires a bios flash to work with 45nm quad-cores. Not typically a problem for component boards, but a big deal for prebuilts since the vendor generally doesn't release bios updates to accommodate cpu upgrades.

And in a general sense, lots of pre-built vendors tend to lock their bios--not specifically in reference to overclocking (though that's the most common reference), but rather because it is an added level of motivation for a consumer to buy their next highest level of product, as opposed to buying a base system and manually upgrading the CPU. They'll probably use identical motherboards in different models, only with different bios versions.

I can't say for 100% that the i5 wouldn't work, only that all of my personal experience would argue otherwise. If there were another i3, I'm sure that one would work, but when you change to a higher class of processor, specifically one that's guaranteed to use and dissipate more power, that's where you're almost guaranteed to encounter problems.

Well, if this is true, than the I5 most certainly would work. The bios inf file is downloadable via the dell support web page, and is tied to the model number of the laptop. The specific model number of my laptop is the N4110, which if you look it up, is either an I3 2310, or an I5 2410. Which would suggest that the bios is coded to handle either of those two processors for sure.

However, the I5 that is currently sold by newegg, is not the one that would be available through dell, so there is no guaranteeing that it would work.

If the bios was tied to more than just the base model number, than I would have to agree with you, however, being that the model number N4110 could apply to any inspiron 14r, with either of those two processors, I would have to believe it would work.


Being that most of you have suggested that it would not be worth the funds to purchase a cpu upgrade, and the relative risk of purchasing said upgrade to find it didn't work, I would tend to agree with the advice given.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post
Well, if this is true, than the I5 most certainly would work. The bios inf file is downloadable via the dell support web page, and is tied to the model number of the laptop. The specific model number of my laptop is the N4110, which if you look it up, is either an I3 2310, or an I5 2410. Which would suggest that the bios is coded to handle either of those two processors for sure.

However, the I5 that is currently sold by newegg, is not the one that would be available through dell, so there is no guaranteeing that it would work.

If the bios was tied to more than just the base model number, than I would have to agree with you, however, being that the model number N4110 could apply to any inspiron 14r, with either of those two processors, I would have to believe it would work.


Being that most of you have suggested that it would not be worth the funds to purchase a cpu upgrade, and the relative risk of purchasing said upgrade to find it didn't work, I would tend to agree with the advice given.
Ah-ha, I see. Well, it's definitely a good thing to know in case there's an i5 that works that you can get on the cheap in the future!
    
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