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Ultra Slim HTPC Build (Mac Mini Alternative) - Page 13

post #121 of 127
Also thinking about building a Proxy Caching Server with an EMC-600. Haven't decided yet how I want to handle the storage situation though. I'm thinking a 32nm Atom processor, dual NIC mini-ITX, 1.25/1.35v stick of RAM, mSATA SSD for the OS, and either a 1TB Seagate SSHD, or a 120GB Kingston HyperX 3k SSD for the storage. Haven't decided yet whether the storage or raw access speed will be more useful.
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post #122 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMv8(1day) View Post

Agreed, I've been building with mATX and mini-ITX boards for about 3 years now and love the aesthetic and efficient design.
To answer your question, yeah, I'm using an A8-5500 quad core in his build, and an A10 5800K in my own mATX build. I've been able to really bring the power consumption down, even without any access to the clocks with the 5500. Unfortunately, I am using the ASRock FM2A85X-ITX. It's a decent board with tons of functionality, but it has overheating issues and has above average power consumption. So even with an extensive amount of undervolting the CPU, the Northbridge, and the RAM, I'm still idling around 22W. ASRock released a BIOS update last week, but I've had the machine off the network in a box the last few days. Once I pull it back out and get it up tonight, I'll update the BIOS and check for other driver updates. Then I'll go back to tweaking the voltage settings, see if I can't get it a little lower before I mount the Gelid Silence.
Speaking of which, I got it last night! Once I am satisfied I can't get the voltage any lower and keep reliability, I'll pull the NT07 for the Gelid and we'll see if the 3.5" will fit. I anticipate maybe having to remove the hard drive hanger plate to gain a couple more mm's. Hopefully not, as like I said, this is a friends build and I don't want to leave him with a taped together machine if I can help it.

Another thought was picking up a pair of the new 1TB 2.5" Seagate SSHDs and run them in RAID 0, but then I would be increasing noise, complexity with RAID, power consumption, and losing speed... Not ideal.
It's just so fun to build something powerful that is so small. My first experience with the Mini ITX form factor was an HTPC I built with a Pentium E2140, Zotac nForce 630i-ITX LGA775 mobo, and Rosewill RS-MI-01 ITX case.

Recently I've just come upon Intel's Thin Mini ITX form factor and love the possibilities it creates. I haven't yet built anything with it but the cool thing is that it make's custom built all-in-one systems a reality (to an extent as you are at the mercy of the companies making monitor cases). Now all-in-one systems are not super popular on OCN because of their limited upgrade-ability and previously not being very customizable. These barebones monitor cases somewhat change that but they are still limited by cooling, space, and are a bit on the expensive side. One particular monitor case the Loop LP-2150 is really slick looking and kind of reminds me of an iMac. The downside of the LP-2150 is that it uses a TN panel but it does have 21.5" 1920x1080 display. Maybe when I can find a reason to build one (hasn't stopped me in the past biggrin.gif) and there is a nice looking monitor case with an IPS panel then I might give it a try. I'd also like to see an AMD based Thin Mini ITX board since the space constraints rarely allow discrete graphics cards (at least if Intel doesn't put large licensing expenses on their internal connectors which they might).

I haven't yet worked with a Trinity based APU but from what I read they are very efficient, low power, and have impressive graphics. Best of luck with the motherboard troubles and hard drive space difficulties.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMv8(1day) View Post

Also thinking about building a Proxy Caching Server with an EMC-600. Haven't decided yet how I want to handle the storage situation though. I'm thinking a 32nm Atom processor, dual NIC mini-ITX, 1.25/1.35v stick of RAM, mSATA SSD for the OS, and either a 1TB Seagate SSHD, or a 120GB Kingston HyperX 3k SSD for the storage. Haven't decided yet whether the storage or raw access speed will be more useful.
I've worked with the EMC-600 as well, and the black one I got was very slick looking. For a long time I used the EMC-600B for my server and the EMC-800S for my HTPC. Then I built a bigger HTPC, so I used the EMC-800S for my server (I had a 3.5" HDD so I didn't have to leave the top off as I did with the EMC-600), and the used the EMC-600B to build an HTPC streaming box for my brother.
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post #123 of 127
I really like these little Habey cases, but they're limited to a 60w adapter. Is there any way to get it to support a bit more power?

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
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post #124 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Droogie View Post

I really like these little Habey cases, but they're limited to a 60w adapter. Is there any way to get it to support a bit more power?

I've currently got THIS hugely powerful (192W adapter/160-200W peak PSU), yet tiny sucker in my friends box right now without any issues.
Waiting on This 90W Pico-PSU with an 80W AC-DC adaptor like this one right now, sent to the wrong address though, so now I have to drive up to MD from DC to pick it up.
The 120W pico-PSU inside isn't the most space saving or coolest running, never mind the pathetically small power window that the inappropriately matched 60W AC-DC adapter leaves you. So pulling it out in favor of a smaller, cooler, more efficient, higher spec'd, PSU/AC-DC adapter combo for me, and most others I would imagine, is a must. You would think they would at least provide a 90W adapter option!
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post #125 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMv8(1day) View Post

I've currently got THIS hugely powerful (192W adapter/160-200W peak PSU), yet tiny sucker in my friends box right now without any issues.
Waiting on This 90W Pico-PSU with an 80W AC-DC adaptor like this one right now, sent to the wrong address though, so now I have to drive up to MD from DC to pick it up.
The 120W pico-PSU inside isn't the most space saving or coolest running, never mind the pathetically small power window that the inappropriately matched 60W AC-DC adapter leaves you. So pulling it out in favor of a smaller, cooler, more efficient, higher spec'd, PSU/AC-DC adapter combo for me, and most others I would imagine, is a must. You would think they would at least provide a 90W adapter option!

How hard is it to put a better psu in there? I'm looking for something tiny to plop an i3 2100 and 120 gig ssd in.
Edited by Droogie - 4/10/13 at 1:02pm
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post #126 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Droogie View Post

I really like these little Habey cases, but they're limited to a 60w adapter. Is there any way to get it to support a bit more power?

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
You have two options, get a larger power adapter that is within spec of the internal 120W PSU or completely upgrade to a larger watt Pico PSU. The trouble with getting a bigger power adapter is that it's not easy to find one with the right specs. I mentioned what kind of power adapter you need in the post below (also keep in mind you need the same size end connector into the case, I forget what size it is off hand):
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben the OCer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mates Rates View Post

Yo man,
What input voltage does your PSU support?
If it only supports 12v then you're only limited to 12v output power adapters. So if you're after a 120w power adapter for instance, you will need to find one thats output is rated at 12v~10a.
If it supports a range of voltages, say 12-25v, you can use any power adapter rated between 12v and 25v.
Thanks, that is very helpful and pretty much answers my question. You directed me in the right direction for the answer. The specs on Newegg state the following for the internal PSU:

Input Voltage Range: 11.2VDC - 14.8VDC
Input Current Range: 12.0A Max @11.2VDC

So as long as I stay within those perimeters for the output rating of the power adapter I think I should be fine.

So the better options would probably be to buy a Pico PSU and compatible power adapter with the watts you want. I won't make a specific recommendation because I don't have personal experience with Pico PSUs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Droogie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AMv8(1day) View Post

I've currently got THIS hugely powerful (192W adapter/160-200W peak PSU), yet tiny sucker in my friends box right now without any issues.
Waiting on This 90W Pico-PSU with an 80W AC-DC adaptor like this one right now, sent to the wrong address though, so now I have to drive up to MD from DC to pick it up.
The 120W pico-PSU inside isn't the most space saving or coolest running, never mind the pathetically small power window that the inappropriately matched 60W AC-DC adapter leaves you. So pulling it out in favor of a smaller, cooler, more efficient, higher spec'd, PSU/AC-DC adapter combo for me, and most others I would imagine, is a must. You would think they would at least provide a 90W adapter option!

How hard is it to put a better psu in there? I'm looking for something tiny to plop an i3 2100 and 120 gig ssd in.
I wouldn't think it would be hard at all. Remove the stock internal PSU to give you more space. Unscrew the power adapter input port and install the new one attached to the Pico PSU. Attach all the necessary power cables to your components, plug-in the new power adapter that goes with the Pico PSU, and you should be good to go.
Edited by Ben the OCer - 4/10/13 at 5:07pm
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OCZ Agility 3 120GB WD Green 2.5TB Samsung Blu-Ray Drive Intel Stock Cooler 
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Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 27" 720P TV Lenovo Multimedia Remote with Keyboard (N5902) Corsair CX430M 
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post #127 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben the OCer View Post

I wouldn't think it would be hard at all. Remove the stock internal PSU to give you more space. Unscrew the power adapter input port and install the new one attached to the Pico PSU. Attach all the necessary power cables to your components, plug-in the new power adapter that goes with the Pico PSU, and you should be good to go.

It takes about 4 minutes and a screw driver. Super simple.
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Vertex 2 120GB Samsung Spinpoint F4EG 2TB Asus BD-ROM BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Win7 Ult 64bit 
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Vertex 2 120GB Samsung Spinpoint F4EG 2TB Asus BD-ROM BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Win7 Ult 64bit 
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