Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › Sean's Windows 7 Install & Optimization Guide for SSDs & HDDs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sean's Windows 7 Install & Optimization Guide for SSDs & HDDs - Page 82

post #811 of 5384
Quote:
Originally Posted by xandypx View Post

Newer Windows 7 DVD media contains the proper directory structure to boot under UEFI.
The "need" to do this all depends on where you got the USB install program from. For the purpose of the guide, it would have been too confusing to determine what installation media the install program you have on your USB drive came from (downloaded vs. DVD vs build, version etc.. )
By creating the folder and copying/renaming the EFI bootloader, no one gets stuck not being able to install under UEFI. For those that don't need it, it doesn't take long to ensure that it works the first time.

Thanks for the info.

What is the difference between these two fields (Boot Option Priority and Hard Disk BBS Priority) in a P8Z68-V/GEN3 BIOS/UEFI?

I see that you can set the boot prioirity in both but which is far more important?

Also, why can I not see the icon without the UEFI strip in my BIOS/UEFI when I select the boot priority? I can only see the one with the UEFI strip. Although in BBS Priority section, I can only see the one without but I can't see the one with.
Edited by kevindd992002 - 11/30/11 at 3:07pm
post #812 of 5384
I just got an SSD and what I'm wondering is that my motherboard is the p6x58d-e which has the marvel on it. So can I download and use the intel rst?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
post #813 of 5384
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tk7331 View Post

I just got an SSD and what I'm wondering is that my motherboard is the p6x58d-e which has the marvel on it. So can I download and use the intel rst?

Please don't use the Marvell ports. Use the Intel ones. Your SSD will perform better.

If you have the SSD plugged into the Marvell port the Intel drivers will do nothing in relation to the SSD. They will only work if it is in the Intel ports.
post #814 of 5384
It is not plugged in to the marvel ports. So I just download and install the intel controller then?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
post #815 of 5384
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tk7331 View Post

It is not plugged in to the marvel ports. So I just download and install the intel controller then?

Yea, smile.gif
post #816 of 5384
Awesome thanks a lot thumb.gif
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
post #817 of 5384
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by xandypx View Post

Newer Windows 7 DVD media contains the proper directory structure to boot under UEFI.
The "need" to do this all depends on where you got the USB install program from. For the purpose of the guide, it would have been too confusing to determine what installation media the install program you have on your USB drive came from (downloaded vs. DVD vs build, version etc.. )
By creating the folder and copying/renaming the EFI bootloader, no one gets stuck not being able to install under UEFI. For those that don't need it, it doesn't take long to ensure that it works the first time.

Thanks for the info.

What is the difference between these two fields (Boot Option Priority and Hard Disk BBS Priority) in a P8Z68-V/GEN3 BIOS/UEFI?

I see that you can set the boot prioirity in both but which is far more important?

Also, why can I not see the icon without the UEFI strip in my BIOS/UEFI when I select the boot priority? I can only see the one with the UEFI strip. Although in BBS Priority section, I can only see the one without but I can't see the one with.

What I bolded above, is a confusing statement/question... I'm not exactly sure what you're asking.

To answer your first question:

The Boot Option Priority is actually what you were used to under a standard BIOS. It tops the BBS priority in the hierarchy of things.

Assume you have set up nothing in these two settings, and you are prepare for the first boot of your PC. You would go through the following steps:

In the Hard Drive BBS Priorities you would enter a submenu that presents you all of the drives connected to the system. Here you can define the boot order for all the connected Hard disks. For example you can specify your SDD as the first priority (Boot Option #1) and a HDD as the second priority (Boot Option #2). This implies that the system will first try to boot from the SSD and if this fail, it will try to boot from the HDD. The same prioritization procedure would then be used for the CD/DVD as well as for any bootable Network devices.

Once you have defined the ordering for each type of devices you then specify an overall priority. This is done in the Boot Option Priorities section of the Boot Menu. think pf the Boot Option prioriy as more of a catagory of boot devices (HDD, Optical, USB)

For example you can define to use (all) the CD/DVDs first; (Boot Option #1) and then to use (all) the HDDs; (Boot Option #2). the confusing part is that in this menu, you will only see the device with the highest priority for a specific type (the device you specified in the BBS Priority as option #1) ie HDD, Optical or Network. If you have several HDDs (using the example above for BBS) you will only see the HDD you set with the highest priority (the SDD)., even though a boot will go through the entire list before moving to the next catagory.

Say your SSD is set as Option #1 in the HDD BBS menu, and HDD set as Option #2. Your DVD drive is set as Option #1 in your optical drive BBS. In your Boot options priority, you have set SSD; Option #1, and DVD; Option #2, a boot would proceed as follows.

The system would first attempt to boot from the SSD. Failing that, an attempt to boot from your HDD (option #2), and then your DVD drive.

Boot options under UEFI differ from a legacy BIOS.

Unlike BIOS which is booting a device (hardware), the UEFI boot option revolves around software:
the UEFI "firmware", specifies the location of a file on a device as boot target (vs. an actual device under BIOS). This file is coded to firmware, or is automatically created by the OS during installation and points to the location of the actual boot file. The UEFI also has a predetermined boot path for all your removable devices. The reason an EFI file needs to be in the proper place (directory; ie bootx64.efi)

During initialization/ POST, the UEFI looks for UEFI boot files on removable devices DVD, USB drives. This is why media must be inserted into the PC prior to powering it up for UEFI devices to show in the Boot/BBS priority menus. No efi file = no UEFI boot device.

If the UEFI finds a device containing an appropriate efi file in the correct directory, the device containing the media will appear in the Boot Option Priorities section. The name of the devices is prefixed with a “UEFI:” string.

For example if you have inserted a Windows7 X64 installation disk in your DVD drive before powering the system on, when you look in the UEFI, you will now have two entries for the DVD drive. The second entry will be prefixed with "UEFI:". Selecting the first one will boot the system in BIOS mode while selecting the second one will boot the system in UEFI mode.

After an install of Windows 7, the OS will also add an additional UEFI "device" when an installation is done to a GPT disk. A “Windows Boot Manager” entry appears as an option. If you were to also install Ubuntu, you may end up with an entry such as “Ubuntu Boot Manager”.

In UEFI mode the BBS priorities are totally ignored, since the order of the boot sequence is now defined by the EFI boot manager. Specifically with Windows Boot Manager, the order of the actual boot Hardware is defined in the "BCD store". If you'd like to see these entries, you can use the BCDedit tool from a command prompt: bcdedit /enum firmware. Under MBR, this tool is not very useful, as all it will show is that the OS should boot from the C drive.
Edited by xandypx - 11/30/11 at 7:50pm
Rusty Metal
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 2600K ASUS P8P67 PRO NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
2 x Corsair Performance 3 SSD 128 GB; RAID 0 2 x Western Digital Black 1TB; RAID 0 Western Digital Black LG BluRay - RE/DVD+/-DL Burner  
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
LG 24x super-multi  Corsair H70 Windows 7 Professional x64 DELL U2711 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
logitech G19 Corsair AX750 Coolermaster Storm Sniper Logitech Performance MX 
Audio
Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Pro  
  hide details  
Reply
Rusty Metal
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 2600K ASUS P8P67 PRO NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
2 x Corsair Performance 3 SSD 128 GB; RAID 0 2 x Western Digital Black 1TB; RAID 0 Western Digital Black LG BluRay - RE/DVD+/-DL Burner  
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
LG 24x super-multi  Corsair H70 Windows 7 Professional x64 DELL U2711 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
logitech G19 Corsair AX750 Coolermaster Storm Sniper Logitech Performance MX 
Audio
Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Pro  
  hide details  
Reply
post #818 of 5384
I just realized I did not enable ACPI 2.0 support. Is there a way I can enable it without having to re-install windows? Is it even that important?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 950 Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte GTX 770  12 GB GSkill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate 1TB, Samsung 2TB TSSTcorp Windows 7 home Premium x64 Asus 24" 1920*1080 x 2 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD XFX 650 watt Cooler Master HAF 932 Logitech G500 
  hide details  
Reply
post #819 of 5384
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tk7331 View Post

I just realized I did not enable ACPI 2.0 support. Is there a way I can enable it without having to re-install windows? Is it even that important?

Don't worry about it.
post #820 of 5384
Quote:
Originally Posted by xandypx View Post

What I bolded above, is a confusing statement/question... I'm not exactly sure what you're asking.
To answer your first question:
The Boot Option Priority is actually what you were used to under a standard BIOS. It tops the BBS priority in the hierarchy of things.
Assume you have set up nothing in these two settings, and you are prepare for the first boot of your PC. You would go through the following steps:
In the Hard Drive BBS Priorities you would enter a submenu that presents you all of the drives connected to the system. Here you can define the boot order for all the connected Hard disks. For example you can specify your SDD as the first priority (Boot Option #1) and a HDD as the second priority (Boot Option #2). This implies that the system will first try to boot from the SSD and if this fail, it will try to boot from the HDD. The same prioritization procedure would then be used for the CD/DVD as well as for any bootable Network devices.
Once you have defined the ordering for each type of devices you then specify an overall priority. This is done in the Boot Option Priorities section of the Boot Menu. think pf the Boot Option prioriy as more of a catagory of boot devices (HDD, Optical, USB)
For example you can define to use (all) the CD/DVDs first; (Boot Option #1) and then to use (all) the HDDs; (Boot Option #2). the confusing part is that in this menu, you will only see the device with the highest priority for a specific type (the device you specified in the BBS Priority as option #1) ie HDD, Optical or Network. If you have several HDDs (using the example above for BBS) you will only see the HDD you set with the highest priority (the SDD)., even though a boot will go through the entire list before moving to the next catagory.
Say your SSD is set as Option #1 in the HDD BBS menu, and HDD set as Option #2. Your DVD drive is set as Option #1 in your optical drive BBS. In your Boot options priority, you have set SSD; Option #1, and DVD; Option #2, a boot would proceed as follows.
The system would first attempt to boot from the SSD. Failing that, an attempt to boot from your HDD (option #2), and then your DVD drive.
Boot options under UEFI differ from a legacy BIOS.
Unlike BIOS which is booting a device (hardware), the UEFI boot option revolves around software:
the UEFI "firmware", specifies the location of a file on a device as boot target (vs. an actual device under BIOS). This file is coded to firmware, or is automatically created by the OS during installation and points to the location of the actual boot file. The UEFI also has a predetermined boot path for all your removable devices. The reason an EFI file needs to be in the proper place (directory; ie bootx64.efi)
During initialization/ POST, the UEFI looks for UEFI boot files on removable devices DVD, USB drives. This is why media must be inserted into the PC prior to powering it up for UEFI devices to show in the Boot/BBS priority menus. No efi file = no UEFI boot device.
If the UEFI finds a device containing an appropriate efi file in the correct directory, the device containing the media will appear in the Boot Option Priorities section. The name of the devices is prefixed with a “UEFI:” string.
For example if you have inserted a Windows7 X64 installation disk in your DVD drive before powering the system on, when you look in the UEFI, you will now have two entries for the DVD drive. The second entry will be prefixed with "UEFI:". Selecting the first one will boot the system in BIOS mode while selecting the second one will boot the system in UEFI mode.
After an install of Windows 7, the OS will also add an additional UEFI "device" when an installation is done to a GPT disk. A “Windows Boot Manager” entry appears as an option. If you were to also install Ubuntu, you may end up with an entry such as “Ubuntu Boot Manager”.
In UEFI mode the BBS priorities are totally ignored, since the order of the boot sequence is now defined by the EFI boot manager. Specifically with Windows Boot Manager, the order of the actual boot Hardware is defined in the "BCD store". If you'd like to see these entries, you can use the BCDedit tool from a command prompt: bcdedit /enum firmware. Under MBR, this tool is not very useful, as all it will show is that the OS should boot from the C drive.

Thank you very very much for a very detailed explanation smile.gif

Now I understand the difference between those two fields in my original question though I still have some concerns that I need to clear up:

1.) Say I already have Windows Boot Manager after installing Windows 7 in a GPT-partitioned drive and booting in UEFI mode. I then want to replace that OS drive with a brand new drive. How do I "reset" the NVRAM to clear the BCD Store of all the efi file path that it remembered previously? Is it as simple as clearing the CMOS with the CMOS jumper/removing the battery?

2.) Regarding the part that you made bold and was confusing, this is what I meant: with a USB Win7 installation drive, shouldn't I get two entries (one with "UEFI:" and the order without) in the Boot Option Priorities section just like installing from a DVD drive? Because with mine, I only get one entry and that is the one with "UEFI:" prefix. This means that if I use this specific USB installation drive (formatted as FAT32 and containing latest Enterprise version of Win7 x64), I can only do a UEFI installation and not an MBR (BIOS) installation. What is the explanation behind this?

Thanks for your help.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Hard Drives & Storage
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › Sean's Windows 7 Install & Optimization Guide for SSDs & HDDs