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post #821 of 5386
I'm really really having a hard time installing Win7 UEFI-based using a USB Flash disk here. I tried yesterday without manually doing bootx64.efi file but I just found out that even if the UEFI shows that UEFI: Flash Disk, it doesn't actually boot to UEFI since when I let Windows partition my HDD, it only does two partitions (System and Primary). I then followed step by step the guide in the OP except for making the USB Flash drive active (since I think it is not needed) but it presents me with the Windows Boot Manager error when I try to boot from the USB Flash Disk.

What's wrong?
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post #822 of 5386
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

I'm really really having a hard time installing Win7 UEFI-based using a USB Flash disk here. I tried yesterday without manually doing bootx64.efi file but I just found out that even if the UEFI shows that UEFI: Flash Disk, it doesn't actually boot to UEFI since when I let Windows partition my HDD, it only does two partitions (System and Primary). I then followed step by step the guide in the OP except for making the USB Flash drive active (since I think it is not needed) but it presents me with the Windows Boot Manager error when I try to boot from the USB Flash Disk.

What's wrong?

Are you trying to completely reinstall?

Follow the guide exactly, don't deviate from it. The drive does need to be marked active or else it won't be bootable.
post #823 of 5386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Webster View Post

Are you trying to completely reinstall?
Follow the guide exactly, don't deviate from it. The drive does need to be marked active or else it won't be bootable.

I'm doing a fresh install on an unformatted hdd..

I've redone the steps in the guide as exact as possible and it still gives me a status error of 0xc000000f when booting,
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post #824 of 5386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

1.) Say I already have Windows Boot Manager after installing Windows 7 in a GPT-partitioned drive and booting in UEFI mode. I then want to replace that OS drive with a brand new drive. How do I "reset" the NVRAM to clear the BCD Store of all the efi file path that it remembered previously? Is it as simple as clearing the CMOS with the CMOS jumper/removing the battery?

2.) Regarding the part that you made bold and was confusing, this is what I meant: with a USB Win7 installation drive, shouldn't I get two entries (one with "UEFI:" and the order without) in the Boot Option Priorities section just like installing from a DVD drive? Because with mine, I only get one entry and that is the one with "UEFI:" prefix. This means that if I use this specific USB installation drive (formatted as FAT32 and containing latest Enterprise version of Win7 x64), I can only do a UEFI installation and not an MBR (BIOS) installation. What is the explanation behind this?

Thanks for your help.

This is probably going to be a very long post.

Very good question... hopefully an understandable answer.

Question #1:

It's easier to explain with a specific BCD file, because I could show specific examples, but in essence no. Clearing the CMOS will not remove duplicate entries from the BCD store, although it will clear the entries from the NVRAM (non-volatile random access memory; for those that may not know what this is).

The NVRAM is on the CMOS chip. The BCD store is a file on the HDD.

The "Hard coded" portion of the CMOS (as I indicated in my previous post) has certain defined locations it looks to for efi information. If it finds the appropriate efi file in a proper location, it creates an entry in NVRAM for that location, and in turn presents that location to you in the UEFI as a "boot option". As the system POSTS, the UEFI compares entries in NVRAM with those in the BCD store, and creates additional entries in NVRAM based on what is in the BCD store, if it finds an appropriate efi file in that location. It works the other way also, where entries are created in the BCD store for locations that are stored in NVRAM. The information in the BCD store always remains there, as it only gets appended (added to) as additional entries are found.

I think what you are getting at is that you can end up with multiple entries in the BCD store that may/do not exist anymore, or are duplicates of already existing entries. What you won’t see in the UEFI (as boot options) are the duplicate or invalid entries. The UEFI will only present you the options where a valid efi file exists, but you are correct, that the BCD store can get rather “clogged” with entries.

In order to remove entries from the BCD store you need to manually edit it. This is where it can get a little hairy (not for the faint of heart), I know of no easy way to do it. It used to be that programs like EasyBCD (NeoSmart Technologies; freeware) would give you a nice, user friendly GUI for editing a BCD store. Unfortunately, until/unless an update is written for UEFI, EasyBCD will not work with a uefi system.

Using BCDedit from a command prompt can be used to edit the BCD store (BCDedit will also edit the entries in NVRAM, so you need to be careful you don’t make your OS non-bootable). As with any command line utility, it’s not pretty.

BDCedit is the utility, and is used with “switches” to accomplish what you want to do.
I mentioned the switch /enum, in the last post. This will show you all of the potential boot locations that have been written to the BCD store. They will be first listed in an “order” with a numerical “identifier”, which can be cross referenced to the actual device in the lower portion of the output. Here is where you would see multiple entries for the same “device” if they exist. For example a duplicate entry for a CDROM would look like this:

Firmware Application (101fffff)


identifier {93cee840-f524-11db-af62-aa767141e6b3}
description Primary Master CDROM

Firmware Application (101fffff)


identifier {8b87c5a0-f2f2-11db-9717-f87ee6ea6002}
description Primary Master CDROM

*Note that the same device has two different identifiers, and the reason why multiple entries end up being created. This is because under UEFI, each device must have a GUID (Globally Unique Identifier)

You would remove the duplicate device (from both the BCD store, and NVRAM) by using multiple BCDedit commands.

Using the example of the CDROMs, you would do the following (the files that you create, following the below instructions will be created in the directory that you are working in (Usually C:\windows\system32, so you want to note the temporary files for later deletion:

First, in windows open an elevated command prompt. Click your start orb and type CMD in the search pane. At the top, right click CMD.exe, and select “run as administrator”. Accept the UAC security warning.

1.) Next, save a copy of the current BCD store. If you make a mistake, you can use this file to recover a non-booting computer:
bcdedit /export savebcd

2.) Make a copy of this file to use for the “delete” operation:
Copy savebcd newbcd

3.) Create a text file of the BCD store based on the /enum output information you saw when you ran that command:
bcdedit /enum > enumfw.txt

4.) Find the text file (enumfw.txt), and open it with notepad. Here it is important that you know which entries you need to leave. You are about to write a command script to remove the duplicate entries contained in the BCD store. Always leave the uppermost entry, deleting duplicate below it. Never remove the entry for Windows Boot Manager {bootmgr}. For the devices that are listed and enumerated by the CMOS/EFI firmware, deleting all of them creates no problem, as on first post with efi media inserted, a new entry will be created in NVRAM.

5.) Open a new blank Notepad file. Name and save this file as “Removedups.cmd”. Make sure the file name is not appended with the .txt extension.

6.) Add a command line instruction to delete the duplicate GUID device from the copy of the BCD store you created in step #2:
bcdedit /store newbcd /delete {8b87c5a0-f2f2-11db-9717-f87ee6ea6002}
The number in brackets corresponds to the GUID for the duplicate device (the second entry for the CDROM noted above).

7.) Type the same command in the notepad file for each duplicate entry you want to remove.

8.) When you are done adding entries, add a final command to the file that will clear the entries from NVRAM, so that the NVRAM will only contain the entries you left untouched during your edit.
bcdedit /import newbcd /clean

9.) save the file.

10.) Run the new file in your command window by typing “Removedups.cmd” and pressing ENTER.

11.) reboot the system, start a command prompt, type bcdedit /enum to verify the deletion of the duplicate entries.

12.) go into your system32 directory and delete the temporary files you created during the process.

13.) if you messed anything up, and can’t boot your computer, you can get your old BCD store back by booting to your windows installation media, select the option to get to a command prompt. Change directory to C:\windows\system32, and run the command bcdedit /import savebcd. this will restore you back to where you started.

Oh yea, another question…. But a least a simple answer:

I suspect that you already are using GPT/UEFI. You cannot mix MBR with GPT. It’s one or the other. The Protective MBR on a GPT disk prevents a new installation as MBR. For an MBR installation, you would need to clean the disk and reset it to MBR.
Edited by xandypx - 12/1/11 at 7:39am
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post #825 of 5386
Thread Starter 
Edit: OMG to the post above! eek.gif


UPDATE!

RAID guide finished, alignment adjustment
Comments added
Updated The installation of Windows 7! part a little for GPT and MBR install
Added more links to downloads, will add more soon as well
Added
*Beta* How to: Use current OS HDD as a data drive after installing a SSD!
How to: Initialize And Format A New Disk For Use In Windows!
And I added download links to the OP for Windows biggrin.gif
First:
  • Do you need a legitimate copy of windows 7?
  • Have you lost your disc or is it damaged yours beyond use?
  • Are you getting Error messages with you installer?
  • Do you want a copy of Windows 7 with SP1 pre-installed?
Click here for download links (Click to show)
post #826 of 5386
What else can I do to keep my SSD clean? I've enabled/disabled several settings specifically for SSD's mentioned in this guide. So far it's all clear, also I've tuned some settings in the 830 software and there's a temporary file cleanup which is also in the 830 software. Is that enough, together with ccleaner for example or are there still some more tweaks/programs to keep it clean and make it last longer?
post #827 of 5386
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sander H View Post

What else can I do to keep my SSD clean? I've enabled/disabled several settings specifically for SSD's mentioned in this guide. So far it's all clear, also I've tuned some settings in the 830 software and there's a temporary file cleanup which is also in the 830 software. Is that enough, together with ccleaner for example or are there still some more tweaks/programs to keep it clean and make it last longer?

I just use ccleaner and disk cleanup (part of windows)

Nothin else is needed. smile.gif
post #828 of 5386
Great, thanks thumb.gif
post #829 of 5386
Quote:
Originally Posted by xandypx View Post

This is probably going to be a very long post.
Very good question... hopefully an understandable answer.
Question #1:
It's easier to explain with a specific BCD file, because I could show specific examples, but in essence no. Clearing the CMOS will not remove duplicate entries from the BCD store, although it will clear the entries from the NVRAM (non-volatile random access memory; for those that may not know what this is).
The NVRAM is on the CMOS chip. The BCD store is a file on the HDD.
The "Hard coded" portion of the CMOS (as I indicated in my previous post) has certain defined locations it looks to for efi information. If it finds the appropriate efi file in a proper location, it creates an entry in NVRAM for that location, and in turn presents that location to you in the UEFI as a "boot option". As the system POSTS, the UEFI compares entries in NVRAM with those in the BCD store, and creates additional entries in NVRAM based on what is in the BCD store, if it finds an appropriate efi file in that location. It works the other way also, where entries are created in the BCD store for locations that are stored in NVRAM. The information in the BCD store always remains there, as it only gets appended (added to) as additional entries are found.
I think what you are getting at is that you can end up with multiple entries in the BCD store that may/do not exist anymore, or are duplicates of already existing entries. What you won’t see in the UEFI (as boot options) are the duplicate or invalid entries. The UEFI will only present you the options where a valid efi file exists, but you are correct, that the BCD store can get rather “clogged” with entries.
In order to remove entries from the BCD store you need to manually edit it. This is where it can get a little hairy (not for the faint of heart), I know of no easy way to do it. It used to be that programs like EasyBCD (NeoSmart Technologies; freeware) would give you a nice, user friendly GUI for editing a BCD store. Unfortunately, until/unless an update is written for UEFI, EasyBCD will not work with a uefi system.
Using BCDedit from a command prompt can be used to edit the BCD store (BCDedit will also edit the entries in NVRAM, so you need to be careful you don’t make your OS non-bootable). As with any command line utility, it’s not pretty.

BDCedit is the utility, and is used with “switches” to accomplish what you want to do.
I mentioned the switch /enum, in the last post. This will show you all of the potential boot locations that have been written to the BCD store. They will be first listed in an “order” with a numerical “identifier”, which can be cross referenced to the actual device in the lower portion of the output. Here is where you would see multiple entries for the same “device” if they exist. For example a duplicate entry for a CDROM would look like this:
Firmware Application (101fffff)


identifier {93cee840-f524-11db-af62-aa767141e6b3}
description Primary Master CDROM
Firmware Application (101fffff)


identifier {8b87c5a0-f2f2-11db-9717-f87ee6ea6002}
description Primary Master CDROM
*Note that the same device has two different identifiers, and the reason why multiple entries end up being created. This is because under UEFI, each device must have a GUID (Globally Unique Identifier)
You would remove the duplicate device (from both the BCD store, and NVRAM) by using multiple BCDedit commands.
Using the example of the CDROMs, you would do the following (the files that you create, following the below instructions will be created in the directory that you are working in (Usually C:\windows\system32, so you want to note the temporary files for later deletion:
First, in windows open an elevated command prompt. Click your start orb and type CMD in the search pane. At the top, right click CMD.exe, and select “run as administrator”. Accept the UAC security warning.
1.) Next, save a copy of the current BCD store. If you make a mistake, you can use this file to recover a non-booting computer:
bcdedit /export savebcd
2.) Make a copy of this file to use for the “delete” operation:
Copy savebcd newbcd
3.) Create a text file of the BCD store based on the /enum output information you saw when you ran that command:
bcdedit /enum > enumfw.txt
4.) Find the text file (enumfw.txt), and open it with notepad. Here it is important that you know which entries you need to leave. You are about to write a command script to remove the duplicate entries contained in the BCD store. Always leave the uppermost entry, deleting duplicate below it. Never remove the entry for Windows Boot Manager {bootmgr}. For the devices that are listed and enumerated by the CMOS/EFI firmware, deleting all of them creates no problem, as on first post with efi media inserted, a new entry will be created in NVRAM.
5.) Open a new blank Notepad file. Name and save this file as “Removedups.cmd”. Make sure the file name is not appended with the .txt extension.
6.) Add a command line instruction to delete the duplicate GUID device from the copy of the BCD store you created in step #2:
bcdedit /store newbcd /delete {8b87c5a0-f2f2-11db-9717-f87ee6ea6002}
The number in brackets corresponds to the GUID for the duplicate device (the second entry for the CDROM noted above).
7.) Type the same command in the notepad file for each duplicate entry you want to remove.
8.) When you are done adding entries, add a final command to the file that will clear the entries from NVRAM, so that the NVRAM will only contain the entries you left untouched during your edit.
bcdedit /import newbcd /clean
9.) save the file.
10.) Run the new file in your command window by typing “Removedups.cmd” and pressing .
11.) reboot the system, start a command prompt, type bcdedit /enum to verify the deletion of the duplicate entries.
12.) go into your system32 directory and delete the temporary files you created during the process.
13.) if you messed anything up, and can’t boot your computer, you can get your old BCD store back by booting to your windows installation media, select the option to get to a command prompt. Change directory to C:\windows\system32, and run the command bcdedit /import savebcd. this will restore you back to where you started.
Oh yea, another question…. But a least a simple answer:
I suspect that you already are using GPT/UEFI. You cannot mix MBR with GPT. It’s one or the other. The Protective MBR on a GPT disk prevents a new installation as MBR. For an MBR installation, you would need to clean the disk and reset it to MBR.

What a very informative answer there, you really know what you're doing smile.gif

In essence though, would a clogged up BCD store file degrade overall performance? If so, what do we need to do to avoid this clogging up?

What would completely remove any information about BCD in the system? Just clean the original OS file to get rid of the BCD store file?

Regarding your question, I was using GPT/UEFI with my previous SSD and yes I know about not mixing MBR with GPT. Last time, I used an installation DVD to install Win7 as UEFI-based. What I'm actually trying to accomplish right now is doing the same in another computer (new board, new SSD, new everything) but this time using a USB Flash Disk. As I've mentioned above, I'm really having a headache now in accomplishing this. When I simply format the flash disk to fat32 and copy from the installation files from the Win7 x64 enterprise iso file, I got a UEFI entry under Boot Options section but when I reboot and boot from it, I only get a blinking dash in the upper left of the screen. When I follow this guide by looking for the appropriate bootx64.efi file, I end getting a Windows Boot Manager error when it boots up. So I'm really lost here.
Edited by kevindd992002 - 12/1/11 at 7:56am
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post #830 of 5386
Thanks Sean Webster thumb.gif
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