New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Distro Roundup! - Page 6

post #51 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post

Oh and 3300 packages in the AUR is somewhat BS. There are so many different kernel packages it's not even funny, every little patch gets a new version (cause somebody maintains it) and it is kind of dumb. The AUR compared to Debian/Ubuntu repositories is small, extremely small. Not to mention with apt-get source and a few other tools you can do the same thing as the AUR, using source packages that you KNOW will work with your system.
And if anyone says debian/ubuntu repos have a lot of -dev packages they are wrong, it's about 5k dev packages in repos with 35k packages. It beats any other repo system out there except (maybe) RH/Fedora, that's just because that is a corporate driven branch.
[edit] There are many things I liked about arch, I didn't mean for this to sound like a rant. However I'm not reviewing arch, I wrote about it months ago and have already stated what I liked about it. It has promise but from what I experienced it still has the same downfalls it had years ago.

AUR has lxmed, beta, aurora, nightly builds of Firefox and beta, dev versions of Chrome/Chromium. Debian doesn't. Find me one package that Debian has that isn't in the AUR.

AUR 6, Debian 0.

Kernel packages? I see around 70 different kernels. A lot? Maybe. But thats just 0.2% of the 33000 packages in the AUR, and for all 70 you can edit the PKGBUILD to add any patches or tweak the kernel options or simply see exactly what its doing, so you know what it will do to your system before you install it.

My little experiment with LMDE has shown me once again that nothing even remotely comes close to pacman and the AUR.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
post #52 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathris View Post

AUR has lxmed, beta, aurora, nightly builds of Firefox and beta, dev versions of Chrome/Chromium. Debian doesn't. Find me one package that Debian has that isn't in the AUR.
AUR 6, Debian 0.
Kernel packages? I see around 70 different kernels. A lot? Maybe. But thats just 0.2% of the 33000 packages in the AUR, and for all 70 you can edit the PKGBUILD to add any patches or tweak the kernel options or simply see exactly what its doing, so you know what it will do to your system before you install it.
My little experiment with LMDE has shown me once again that nothing even remotely comes close to pacman and the AUR.

Do PPA's not count? or is AUR the only NON-Official repo you count in your search?
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
post #53 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathris View Post

Arch is essentially Slackware with dependency resolution and Gentoo with precompiled packages. Its designed for people who want a vanilla Linux system without a ton of bloat.
And the difference between the package managers is speed and stability. My experiences with apt often ended in the program crashing halfway through a system update, and I can manually install packages faster than yum and yast do. pacman is fast, power, simple, and most importantly, it actually works.

Greetz and Hmmmmmm...
I suppose on some level since at their base all distros use the same basic kernel, one can say that any distro is "essentially" another - the old "snowflake" deal. However, up higher, where the differences exist, I have to strongly disagree that Arch != Slackware. Yes, I know that it is a branch off the Slackware tree, but unlike trees, software branches mutate. wink.gif

For the record I like Arch well enough but it is most certainly NOT Slackware, nor is it vanilla. For one thing that becomes impossible immediately upon utilizing dependency resolving since that requires changing things to suit that particular flavor while not "crossing swords" with other package management. Functionally this means that in Slackware I can always choose to install from source and have nothing to do to but a simple "/configure&&make&&make install" and it just works. Similarly installer packages like game installers and nVidia driver installers require no "tuning". They just go in. In fact a completely vanilla, unpatched kernel will boot and run every Slack system I've ever had, with only having to make certain the file system was supported at kernel level. No patches. Just an option selected. redface.gif

mad.gif One more time I suppose I have to chime in about "Bloat". This is NOT Windows that "preloads" and pre-assigns memory, often failing to release it and re-assigning even more, nor dependent on that Monster of All Eggs in One Basket, The Windows Registry. The only bloat that exists in Linux, other than within badly written applications, as a system, is hard drive space or failure to disable services you don't need. Linux loads On Demand, period. If your system is bloated, it's because you demanded it or failed to "un-demand". rolleyes.gif

So, specific to Slackware (which recommends a full install to extreme advantage), while it does take up more hard drive space to insure that all that is likely needed is just there (and chosen by the devs for version and, if necessary, tweaked to guarantee compatibility with the sacrosanct system as a whole, it is most assuredly NOT bloated in terms of memory footprint and cpu usage. thumb.gif
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Gigabyte GTX 760  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14, Studio KUbuntu, OpenSuSe 12.3, Wi... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Gigabyte GTX 760  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14, Studio KUbuntu, OpenSuSe 12.3, Wi... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #54 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathris View Post

AUR has lxmed, beta, aurora, nightly builds of Firefox and beta, dev versions of Chrome/Chromium. Debian doesn't. Find me one package that Debian has that isn't in the AUR.
AUR 6, Debian 0.
Kernel packages? I see around 70 different kernels. A lot? Maybe. But thats just 0.2% of the 33000 packages in the AUR, and for all 70 you can edit the PKGBUILD to add any patches or tweak the kernel options or simply see exactly what its doing, so you know what it will do to your system before you install it.
My little experiment with LMDE has shown me once again that nothing even remotely comes close to pacman and the AUR.

The different versions of chrome come in Stable/Testing/Unstable/Experimental as accordingly to their stability. Firefox isn't on Debian (pure) as they have philosophy issues and so it won't ever be found. However I can pull the PPAs from Ubuntu, and so I can get it on an official debian compatible repository.

As for kernel packages, they have repositories for some of the major "versions" that include a lot of those patches. Not to mention, your talking about 70 hits that aren't even the kernel. You also have in there 30 or so Nvidia options, which are useless as you can use dkms for EVERYTHING. Oh what's that, debian has dkms?

The problem is, I don't want, nor have the time, to pull from the AUR. Why on earth do you need to re-compile LMDE? Or even firefox/chrome/whatever? You don't, that's the point. The optimizations you get from those types of programs is pointless, as they aren't written to even use the optimizations. If you don't write it in the code, the flags and custom compiles do almost NOTHING. In fact, I think the firefox nightly pulls from rpm packages (checking):
Code:
# Maintainer: Cedric MATHIEU <me.xenom @ gmail.com>
# Contributor : Det <nimetonmaili @ gmail.com>
# Contributor: coderoar <coderoar @ gmail.com>

pkgname=firefox-nightly
pkgdesc='Standalone web browser from mozilla.org, nightly build'
url='http://www.mozilla.org/projects/firefox'
pkgver=11.0a1
pkgrel=1
arch=('i686' 'x86_64')
license=('MPL' 'GPL' 'LGPL')
source=('firefox-nightly.desktop' 'firefox-nightly-safe.desktop')
sha1sums=('d998c8a825bb0f58594f822a2e2fbb7c0a1a3ce8' 'd98f7a35fd423a9701dcaef7d4bbffee939198c7')
depends=('desktop-file-utils' 'libxt' 'mime-types' 'nss' 'shared-mime-info')

package() {
  FX_SRC="firefox-${pkgver}.en-US.linux-${CARCH}.tar.bz2"
  FX_SRC_URI="http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/firefox/nightly/latest-trunk/${FX_SRC}"

  msg "Downloading..."
  wget -N ${FX_SRC_URI}
  msg "Extracting..."
  bsdtar -x -f ${FX_SRC}
  msg "Packaging..."

#   uncomment this line to remove these
#   rm -rf firefox/{extensions,plugins,searchplugins}

  mkdir -p "${pkgdir}"/{usr/{bin,share/{applications,pixmaps}},opt}
  cp -r firefox "${pkgdir}/opt/firefox-${pkgver}"

  ln -s /opt/firefox-${pkgver}/firefox "${pkgdir}/usr/bin/firefox-nightly"
  install -m644 "${srcdir}"/{firefox-nightly.desktop,firefox-nightly-safe.desktop} "${pkgdir}/usr/share/applications/"
  install -m644 "${srcdir}/firefox/icons/mozicon128.png" "${pkgdir}/usr/share/pixmaps/${pkgname}-icon.png"
}

Oh look at that, it's a generic binary no different as if I downloaded the Ubuntu build (not rpm but they have done it). That's odd....

There is a TON of crap in the AUR that does that, it's another thing that pissed me off. Building more advanced software like that tends to require a lot more to be done so you often see people stripping out deb/rpm packages instead. This leads to incompatibility problems later due to the nature of them not being built against the same system.

If you want me to get into this discussion of how Arch has design flaws I'll go there, because I can nit pick very well it's why I chose to move to another distro. Beyond that, having an AUR that uses other distro's packages seems a bit redundant. In fact, it tells me how unoptimized arch linux can really be. I can build those packages from source, from Debian's source repositories and yet you still can't coming from a hugely source based distro. That is sloppy, just sloppy.
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #55 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post

They just go in. In fact a completely vanilla, unpatched kernel will boot and run every Slack system I've ever had, with only having to make certain the file system was supported at kernel level. No patches. Just an option selected. redface.gif


Last I checked the slack kernel has more patches applied to it than Arch. Moreso now that Arch has ditched Aufs2 support.




And that PKGBUILD simply pulls the generic Firefox build from Mozilla's servers, installs it and places the appropriate application shortcuts. I doubt the Ubuntu build does that, since Ubuntu messes up the library names (at least, whenever I tried to install a Ubuntu .deb I had to symlink a bunch of libraries due to filename discrepencies)

I don't see what your problem is with that. If you were to install the latest Firefox nightly those are the exact steps you would take anyway.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
post #56 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathris View Post

Last I checked the slack kernel has more patches applied to it than Arch. Moreso now that Arch has ditched Aufs2 support.
And that PKGBUILD simply pulls the generic Firefox build from Mozilla's servers, installs it and places the appropriate application shortcuts. I doubt the Ubuntu build does that, since Ubuntu messes up the library names (at least, whenever I tried to install a Ubuntu .deb I had to symlink a bunch of libraries due to filename discrepencies)
I don't see what your problem is with that. If you were to install the latest Firefox nightly those are the exact steps you would take anyway.

Ubuntu builds firefox from source, same with just about every other distro out there. I don't see how you could ever have library problems with Ubuntu running Ubuntu while using the proper repositories for your version. I call BS on that because I've used those exact same packages with Debian, there is no way you should have to system link anything. [edit] Unless your trying to use the ubuntu version in Arch, then I would tell you it's obvious you would have to system link crap.

there isn't anything wrong with using generic binaries, no, but it's misleading since the AUR is supposed to be designed to pull stuff from source.


[edit]

If you go through the aur, you'll also find that a lot of packages repeat with minor patch/version differences.

http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=conky&do_Search=Go&detail=1&C=0&SeB=n&SB=v&SO=d&PP=50&outdated=
http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=openoffice&do_Search=Go&detail=1&C=0&SeB=n&SB=v&SO=d&PP=50&outdated=
(how many different OOOs do you need? What, you can't just get language packs like everyone else?)
http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=kernel&do_Search=Go&detail=1&C=0&SeB=n&SB=v&SO=d&PP=50&outdated=
(47 different kernels, but it's scattered and you see repeat stuff/ a lot of it is for very SPECIFIC hardware that should be supported in later kernels)
http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=firefox&do_Search=Go&detail=1&C=0&SeB=n&SB=v&SO=d&PP=50&outdated=
(93 different FF versions, multiple versions from THE SAME BRANCH it's ridiculous)

You even have themes in the AUR, which I find moronic as all themes should be drag n' drop in their appropriate theme folder. You can pick the AUR apart and it will have at least a couple k worth of duplicate packages, it already has 8k worth of non-updated packages.
Edited by mushroomboy - 11/15/11 at 8:19pm
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #57 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post

Unless your trying to use the ubuntu version in Arch, then I would tell you it's obvious you would have to system link crap.
there isn't anything wrong with using generic binaries, no, but it's misleading since the AUR is supposed to be designed to pull stuff from source.

This is where we come back to enorbet2's argument about vanilla. You don't have to symlink crap with Arch, since its all vanilla. There's no adding arbitrary 0s and 2s onto libraries for whatever arcane reason the Ubuntu devs have.


And AUR wasn't designed to pull stuff from source. When you talk about source in AUR you're talking about package source, as in compiling a package from existing files. Those files can be anything, even as you mention, themes. I always install the archlinux-artwork package on my system. Could I go out and manually download the files? Sure. But why would I when I can do it all with a single command. AUR packages can be anything from simple scripts to fullblown packages, and its all moderated by the community. You don't get that kind of power from any other distro.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4670k ASUS Maximus VI Gene Gigabyte GTX 460 1GB Kingston Hyper-X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 830 OCZ Vertex 3 WD6401AALS WD5000AAKS 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Noctua NH-D14 elementary OS Dell Ultrasharp U2312HM LG W2442PA-BF 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair HX750W Corsair Graphite 600T Logitech G700 
Audio
ASUS Xonar DG 
  hide details  
Reply
post #58 of 108

The point of the initrd/initramfs is to do whatever may be necessary to make the root filesystem accessible. If you just have a basic hard drive on an internal SATA controller and SATA compiled into your kernel, you don't really NEED an initrd. But most distros build them anyway with a wide selection of drivers, for a couple of reasons: First, to keep the boot process relatively consistent across hardware, and second, to allow you to move the hard drive to another motherboard and still boot. The initrd can also arrange to provide access to network filesystems such as NFS or SAN/iSCSI and thus your boot drive could be your SAN. I have one Fedora box doing exactly this.

Underground
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 920 C0 ASUS P6T6 WS Revolution GTX 460 TR3X6G1600C8D 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD1001FALS SAMSUNG SH-S223F 22X DVD MULTI Corsair H50 Fedora 16 KDE x86_64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
HP w19b Microsoft Comfort Curve Corsair CX600 Thermaltake Armor VA8003BWS 
MouseMouse Pad
Razer DeathAdder Black 
  hide details  
Reply
Underground
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 920 C0 ASUS P6T6 WS Revolution GTX 460 TR3X6G1600C8D 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
WD1001FALS SAMSUNG SH-S223F 22X DVD MULTI Corsair H50 Fedora 16 KDE x86_64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
HP w19b Microsoft Comfort Curve Corsair CX600 Thermaltake Armor VA8003BWS 
MouseMouse Pad
Razer DeathAdder Black 
  hide details  
Reply
post #59 of 108
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by error10 View Post

The point of the initrd/initramfs is to do whatever may be necessary to make the root filesystem accessible. If you just have a basic hard drive on an internal SATA controller and SATA compiled into your kernel, you don't really NEED an initrd. But most distros build them anyway with a wide selection of drivers, for a couple of reasons: First, to keep the boot process relatively consistent across hardware, and second, to allow you to move the hard drive to another motherboard and still boot. The initrd can also arrange to provide access to network filesystems such as NFS or SAN/iSCSI and thus your boot drive could be your SAN. I have one Fedora box doing exactly this.

I build initrd's for ubuntu, as it does it automatically if you build a kernel the debian way, even if it didn't I would go the extra step, as there are times I do pull my HDD and use it other computers, or build the kernel on my main rig, and transfer it to be used on the other computers.

as for building them on a system that doesn't have a fancy script/program to do it, mkinitrd isn't all that hard to use.
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
Bazinga Punk
(12 items)
 
ooh shiny!
(6 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I5 6500 Gigabyte z170xp-SLI Nvidia 970gtx Corsair 16gb ddr4 2666mhz  
Hard DriveOS
250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
  hide details  
Reply
post #60 of 108
Not explicitly but indirectly. In the history in the wiki they reference PKGBUILD files in association with programs, now I wonder why that is? I've been doing this a lot longer than most here despite being such a young person in the linux community. I remember when Arch was a blip that people ignored, now it's taken off and a lot of what it started as has changed. However it is funny that the intentions were a source based distro, now it's more of a muck.
[edit] whatev, look you can run Arch I don't really care. I'm just saying that there are stability issues, they don't even promote arch linux and stability. Nothing on par with the bigger names. Either way, Arch can be a muck and a PITA compared to a lot of other distributions.

[edit] I hate this new system so far.
Edited by mushroomboy - 11/16/11 at 1:30am
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Current Rig
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 4.6GHz@1.44v GA-990FXA-UD3 R4.0 HD 7950 (1100/1450) 8G Muskin DDR3 1866@8CLS 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
1TB WD LiteOn DVD-RW DL Linux/Windows 19" Phillips TV 1080p 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
OCZ 600W Generic Junk Logitech MX400 Generic Junk 
Audio
SBL 5.1 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix